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'A 



I 



PRAYEBS FOR THE DEAD, 



FOR THE USE OF 



^emteras of tfie <Ett)ttrd) of (S^glanti^ 



WITH A PREFACE; 



V: 



TO WHICH ARB AilDBD 

MEDITATIONS ON THE FOUR LAST THINGS, 

WITH INSTEUOnONS FOR USING THEM, 
AND OTHER DEVOTIONS. 



" The Lord gnmt nnto him that he may find mjercy ^i the Lord 
in that Day." '-^Z^im. {. 18. 



- 4 






7 



LONDON: 
JAMES TOOVEY, 192, PICCADILLY. 

1846. 



• • • • 

• •• 

••••.■ ' ■• 

: 



LONDON: 

PRTITTRO BT 8, ft J. BBWTUET. WtLBOIT, AND FtRY 

Bangor Hooae. Shoe Lane. 



PREFACE. 



L 



Next to the direct worship of Gkxl, there is nothing 
which arises more immediately from religious feel- 
ing than reverence for the Departed. Perhaps the 
amount of national religion in any country in an- 
cient or in modem times, might he tested hy this de- 
velopment of it alone ; for a state of existence after 
death, is one of the first articles in the creed of Nature. 
If to helieve " that God is and that He is a rewarder 
of them that diligently seek Him," he the first truth 
to be learned, then to helieve that there is a "where" 
He does reward His worshippers, is the second. On 
the other hand, to profess ignorance as to the state 
of the departed, is always tKe note of infidelity. 
Men are loth to contemplate a time in their being 
when things will assume their true hues and value, 
and when the objects of sense having returned to 
their original nothingness, spiritual things will appear 
in their real light and importance. 

A witness in support of this view is found in the 
prevalence amongst all nations, in the most ancient 
times, of the rites of burial. There is the same sort 
of evidence that the universal custom of primitive 
times was to " bury their dead out of their sight," 
that there is of the original worship of one God. 
And this custom is as undoubted a note of belief in 
the resurrection of the flesh, burning the body or yet 
worse departures from primitive practice of infidelity, 
or some heretical depravatioii oi tV^ ^jm^ilti,^^ ^^^%* 



VI 



acceptable sacrifice of the firstlings of his flock^ and 
all the patriarchal sacrifices of living animals, is of 
faith in the Lamb of God slain before the foundation 
of the world. 

Now it is obvious to expect, as God vouchsafes 
clearer views of His intentions with regard to man- 
kind, the further development also of particular 
truths known but in their germs in earlier Dispen- 
sations. Hence we should be prepared beforehand 
to find under the later ages of the Jewish polity, 
and much more in the Christian Church, a progres- 
sive knowledge of the state of the departed, and 
their relations to us who are yet in the flesh, if, as I 
think indisputable, there was a revelation respecting 
them, however scanty, in patriarchal times, and 
during the first era of the Mosaic Covenant. 

Solemn burial, then, which was common through- 
out the world, being some evidence of faith in the 
resurrection of the body. Job's words may be taken 
to denote the superiority of the degree of light on 
the subject which the Patriarchs had over the 
Heathen world at large. " I know that my Re- 
deemer liveth, and that He shall stand at the latter 
day upon the earth : and though after my skin 
worms destroy this body, yet in my flesh shall I see 
God : whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes 
shall behold and not another ; though my reins be 
consumed within me ;" ^ where, on this hypothesis, the 
special excellence in Job's knowledge is his faith in 
a Redeemer, and his connecting that with the resur- 
rection of the flesh — for the last truth he held only in 
common with others. 

But what has been said, it will be thought, 
perhaps, goes only to establish the fact that the 
Patriarchs and others believed a resurrection of the 
body would one day take place, without at all shew- 

' Job, xix. 25. 



vu 



ing them to have liad any belief in a separate and 
continuous existence of the soul, to let alone its state 
in that existence. Howeyer, so great a step being 
gained as an expectation of the re-quickening of 
the body, which so evidently appears to die, and, as 
far as the nature of things admits, to be annihilated 
after death ; the far easier belief in the intermediate 
state of the soul, which never seems to come to an 
end, may without difficulty be traced — though, at 
the same time, it may not be possible to prove 
it incontrovertibly to the satisfaction of all minds. 
Just as the belief in any future state of existence 
may be, and has been denied of the Patriarchs, so 
their belief in the intermediate existence of the soul 
may be controverted even by those who admit that 
they expected the resurrection of the flesh. In either 
case there are traces of their belief — phenomena, so 
to speak, which cannot be so easily explained on any 
other hypothesis than it; and yet in both one case 
and the other absolute demonstration there is not. 

The Sadducees saw no reason for believing in 
" angel or spirit," nor yet " in the resurrection," 
though they professed to receive the five books of 
Moses as inspired. 

As, then, against those who say the old Fathers 
looked only for temporary promises, we are accus- 
tomed to urge the general belief of all nations in a 
future state ; so against those who say they did not 
believe in the separate existence of the soul, the 
universal prevalence of a belief in ghostly appear- 
ances may be pressed. The very general (if not 
quite universal reception) of both these articles of 
faith is sufficient reason to account for their not 
being mentioned more expressly than they are in the 
Sacred History ; and when we find them indirectly 
alluded to, it is as much as we ought to ex!^ect« 
They were already received art\c\eib oi ^Jaa cc^^^ <^^ 



VIU 



Nature, and did not require therefore to be enforced 
by fresh revelations. On the contrary, had the pr»< 
Tailing belief been &lse, we might surely have anti* 
cipated its refutation. The whole Pentateuch is a 
denial and reproof of the growing tendency to Pdj- 
theism and idolatrous wor&p.^ 

'^ What reconciliation,'' it is asked, '* could nien 
have found of the &ct of righteous Abel's prema- 
ture death with the justice of Almighty Qod, if thej 
expected no future state of being in which men 
were to be rewarded according to their deeds f " And 
what ground, we may ask, had they for doubting 
that that retribution b^an immediately after deathi 
which was the common opinion of the G^tiles f 

Again : *" Enoch walked with God^ and he was 
not ; for God took him."* On which words, St. Paul 
thus comments : — ^' Enoch was translated that he 
should not see death ; and was not found, because 
God had translated him ; for before his translation 
he had this testimony, that he pleased God."' Is it 
coDceiyable, that with this example before their eyes, 
the Patriarchs doubted either a future existence^ or 
a continuance of the soul's existence after death t 
Enoch's exemption from the common death of nuuk- 
kind, was indeed the special reward of his fidth ; but 
his living after death is mentioned as nothing pecu- 
liar. It was the general confession of the Patriarchs) 
we are told by the Apostle, that '' they were stran- 
gers and pilgrims on the earth ;" and that in sudi 
words they plainly declared that they were seekiiu^ 
not an ead*thly but a heavenly country — ^for which 

' Just as we aigne that the Jews could not Imye coirapted tbe 

canon of the Old Testament, because, had they dime so, C!hriit 

would surely have leproyed them for it ; — so may we feel certMU 

that the belief conceminj? the departed preyailing in his times WM 

true, because MoacBf so or from c(m{Qtxng^haft\ak«i^\\.{Qit ^gnated. 

^ 2 Oen. F. 24. * U^^a. xi. ^. 






IX 

reason Gk>d is not ashamed to be called their God, 
that is, the God of Abraham and of Isaac and of 
Jacob, which are the very words our blessed Lord 
uses to shew " that the dead," not will be, but " are 
raised," — and to refute the unbelieving Sadducees, 
who denied, as all spiritual existence, so of course, 
anj separate existelice of the soul. Not to insist 
farther on the care which all the Patriarchs from 
Abraham downwards evinced concerning their burial, 
which may be said to prove only their faith in the 
future resurrection of the body, what meaning could 
they attach to such an expression as that which de> 
scribes Jacob's death, unless the belief in the inter- 
mediate state were habitual and unquestioned ? We 
read, " And when Jacob had made an end of com- 
manding his sons, he gathered up his feet into the 
bed, and yielded up the ghost,"^ that is, his spirit ; 
yielded it up to whom ] can we hesitate to answer, 
" to the God of the spirits of all jleshf^ as He is twice 
called in the book of Numbers P Can there be any 
doubt that the faith was then, as in Solomon*s days 
afterwards, that at death '^ the spirit shall return unto 
God who gave it?"* and that there was this great 
difference between the death of the sons of men and 
the death of beasts — ^that though as to their bodies, 
'^ all go unto one place, all are of the dust, and all 
turn to dust again," on the contrary, the '' spirit of 
man goeth upward, — ^the spirit of the beast goeth 
downward to the earth T 

Enough has been said to prove a belief which, in 
any days less sceptical than the present, might have 
been faihxlj assumed, and the onus of disproving left 
to those who, to shelter the scepticism of their own 
religious views, would persuade us the Patriarchs 
were disposed to doubt the common articles of faith 



* 



of all mankind equally with themselvegi. But there 
is an event recorded in the history of the children of 
Israel, connected with this suhject/.ao remarkable,, 
that it would be improper to pass over^ it. I mean 
the raising of Samuel, after his death, by the woman 
who had dealings with a familiar spirit, at the com-' 
mand of Saul. Let us only consider this history as 
we read it in 1 Sam. xxviii. without the gloss or coit- 
mentary of those who are engaged to support an. Op- 
posing theory, and we shall surely feel no doubt thul-' 
in its literal sense at least it fully authorises th^ 
belief in an intermediate state, and the possibility^ 
of the re-appearance of those who are no longer; in 
the flesh. ' . . • .••»•.► , 

Samuel was dead, and all Israel had lainented^nf^* 
buried him. Saul, who had now well nigh r\n{'^ut' 
his rebellious career, when the Philistines gathered; 
their armies together for warfare to figh| with IsrJt^t/^ 
inquired of (tlje Lord, but " the Lord a-nswered'h^m.*;- 
not, neither by dreams, nor by Urim, nor by pro- 
phets ;" that is, he could learn nothing concerning j 
his approaching fate by any of those lawful means by 
which God was wont to intimate future events to 
His chosen people. There remained no oracle./ to 
resort to, except he trod the unhallowed and forbid3^n ; 
paths of witchcraft and necromancy : what should he*^ 
dol. He had himself forbidden witchcraft ; nay, in his • 
forfeier happier days, while he was living in obedience 
to 4he "WiQe of God and the law of Moses, he "had 
hijfcself,' with- holy zeal for God's glory, forcibly "put 

^^JSy*^^^^?.'lfe''* l^ familiar spirits, and the wizards, 
oul of th$ Ivid." But now, in his necessity, he re- 
solves ta transgress those laws, of which he was the 
appointed guardian, and sets out in disguise to the 
dwelling of the sorceress at Endor, where being ar- 
rived " by night," he said to her : " I pray thee, divine 
unto me by the familiar spirit, aiid\iTm^m^\ivffiL\5c^, 



i 



XI 



whom I Aall name unto thee." Here, observe, there 
was no doubt expressed on the side of the king as to 
her power of raising whom she would, nor any fear 
on the part of the woman lest she should be unable 
to comply with his request ;" her only fear now, and 
again when she had actually raised Samuel, was, lest 
she should suffer as a witch and for the transgression 
of the laws. Reassured by Saul's oath, she simply 
asks, " Whom shall I bring up unto theel" and then 
at once endeavours with success — ^by God's extraor- 
dinary permission in this case of course — to call up 
the spirit of the great Prophet. Her terror on seeing 
him arises from the knowledge she now acquires that 
it is Saul who is present ; and the king, she thinks, 
must avenge the breach of God's commandment, 
though he had himself suggested it. However, again 
taking courage, she describes the whole appearance 
that is taking place, even " gods ascending out of 
the earth," and Samuel, in the form probably he 
bore latterly while on earth — " an old man covered 
with a mantle." Neither did Saul doubt the reality 
of the vision ; he *^ perceived that it was Samuel," 
and did obeisance to him. We should pay attention, 
too, to the words of Samuel : " Why hast thou dis- 
dieted me to bring me up ?" Surely these are the 
obvious words of one who is disturbed from his " rest" 
in Abraham's bosom, his prison of hope, to appear 
on earth again now in his disembodied state. Next 
he foretells Saul's impending ruin : " The Lord will 
deliver Israel with thee into the hands of the Philis- 
tines ; and to-morrow shaU thou and thy sons be with 
mc." Here was no ocular delusion, no vain flight of 
the imagination, but stem reality, which all came 
exactly to pass the very next day. It is at least 
difficult, without departing further from . the literal 
meaning of Scripture than modem principles of in- 
j ierpretatioB can afford, to dou\>t ^^ t^si^Xi^ ^i ^^ 



Xll 



/ 



appearance, which is confirmed by the emphatic way 
in which the original text calls it " Samuel himself;" 
still less the impression conveyed by it to the minds 
of the Jews, one of whom in after days alluding to 
it, says in praise of Samuel, that " after his death 
he prophesied, and shewed the king his end, and 
lifted up his voice from the earth." ^ 

Surely this history has on the face of it, a strong 
tendency to support the Catholic belief, that the 
souls of the departed both before and since our 
Lord's coming, are detained in God's secret mansions, 
awaiting the great and awful day of Judgment, the 
hour of which is still future and unknown, though 
long since determined in the secret and immutable 
counsels of the Father. 

But, of course, if men are as much alive after 
they are withdrawn from this world as they are now, 
and the last Judgment is still to them as well as to 
us, an event in expectation, both their present state 
and their future sentence may be affected by our 
prayers, unless revelation should declare the con- 
trary : and that revelation does not declare the con- 
trary, is obvious from this circumstance alone, that 
both amongst the Jews — never on that account re- 
buked by our Lord — ^and in the Church of Christ, 
prayers have been always offered up, not for the 
quick only, but also for the dead. This is proved 
very clearly as regards the former, by the following 
passage from the second book of Maccabees, in quoting 
which, it is to be remembered, that I am not apply- 
ing the authority of a book which our Church has 
judged to be apocryphal to " establish any doctrine," 
but only a simple historical fact, namely, that Judas 
Maccabeus, the great High Priest by whom God 

' £ccle8ia8ticu&, ii^ ^^. 



Xlll 

wrought such special deliverances for His chosen 
people out of the hands of the Gentiles, and whose 
feast of dedication was sanctioned by our Blessed 
Lord's observance of it, did pray for the dead. 

Certain of the soldiers of Judas Maccabeus, in his 
vars with the heathen, had been slain in battle ; 
afterwards when their comrades, with Judas, came to 
take up the bodies to bury them, they fqund that 
each had things consecrated to the idols of the Jam- 
nites " under their coats," which is forbidden the 
Jews by the law. " Then every man saw that this was 
the cause wherefore they were slain." God, they 
piously concluded, had testified His abhorrence of 
their offence by suffering them to fall in battle. 
" All men, therefore, praising the Lord, the righteous 
Judge, who had opened the things that were hid, 
betook themselves unto prayer, and besought Him 
that the sin committed might wholly be put out of 
remembrance. 

" Besides that, noble Judas exhorted the people to 
keep themselves from sin, for-so-much as they saw 
before their eyes the things that came to pass for the 
sins of those that were slain. And when he had 
made a gathering throughout the company to the 
sum of 2000 drachms of silver, he sent it to Jeru- 
salem to offer a sin oflering, doing therein very well 
and honestly, in that he was mindfril of the resur- 
rection : for if he had not hoped that they that were 
slain should have risen again, it had been superfluous 
and vain to pray for the dead : and also in that he 
perceived that there was great favour laid up for those 
that died godly, it was an holy and good thought. 
Whereupon he made a reconciliation for the dead, 
that they might be delivered from sin."* 

Now whatever authority we may feel this to be for 

' 2 Maccabeei, ni. ^9 1o t)^Q «oA. 



\ 



XIV 



the custom itself, it is, I suppose, undeniable — 1st, 
that the author of this book believed prayer for the 
dead " an holy and good thought ;" and 2ndly, that 
he mentions it as an historical fact, that it was prac- 
tised by Judas Maccabeus, who flourished about the 
year 164 B.C. There is not the least reason to sup- 
pose that it was introduced by Judas ; and we may 
justly conclude, that what is thus confidently alluded 
to in proof of another doctrine, viz. the resurrection, 
was the acknowledged custom. ^ 

To proceed : that prayer for the departed was the 
universal practice of the Church of Christ from the 
times of the Apostles, is quite as clear. No one pro- 
bably denies that it was a very ancient custom, and 
if it were practised in the Jewish Church, which we 
have seen to be the case, there is at once an a priori 
probability that, unless expressly forbidden by our 
Lord and his Apostles, it would pass with the Psalms 
and the reading of the Old Testament, &c., into the 
services of the primitive Christians. 

Now it so happens that prayers for the dead may 
be proved to have existed in the primitive liturgies 
on apostolic authority. All the liturgies which are, 
or ever have been extant, may be traced to one oif 
four originals ; these are commonly attributed to 
four of the inspired writers of the New Testament, 
and as the use of these or of liturgies derived from 
these, was spread over the four quarters of Christen- 
dom, no authority short of apostolic, could have in- 
troduced those points in which they are all agreed. 

* Deut. xxxiii. 6, " Let Reuben Kve, and not die." The Chal- 
dee translator, as well as SS. Ephrem and Epiphanius, understand 
this text of Moses praying for Reuben^s soul. Prayers for the 
dead occur also in Jewish ritual books. And cf Ps. cxlix. 5, 
" Let the Saints be joyful in glory : let them sing aloud upon their 
beds ; " which seeniB to be most natuiaUy taken, aa Oi ^cd-^f^^* 



XV 

Besides which, their difference in non-essentials is too 
great to admit of the supposition of one having copied 
from, another ; and their agreement in essentials too 
striking to allow of onr doubting that their compilers 
were educated in the same school. Nothing less, 
then, than apostolic origin will account at once for 
their resemblances and differences. Now they all con- 
tain a prayer "for the rest and peace of all those who 
have departed this life in God's faith and fear." 

After this it would be needless to adduce the tes- 
timonies of individual Fathers. No one, till an ob- 
scure Arian heretic, Aerius by name, in the fourth 
century,^ seems to have disputed the efficacy of inter- 
cessions for the dead ; but it may be more to the 
purpose to allude to two or three passages in Holy 
Scripture, which have been commonly thought to 
have reference to the subject, and brought forward in 
argument for or against the practice. 

To begin with the latter ; in chap. xi. of the book 
of Ecclesiastes, we read : " If the clouds be full of 
rain, they empty themselves upon the earth : and if 
the tree fall toward the south, or toward the north, 
in the place where the tree falleth, there it shall be." 
The beginning of this chapter is an exhortation to 
charity, and this verse is in the former part a para- 
bolical illustration of that Christian duty ; in the 
latter, of the reason for exercising it in time. The 
clouds pouring plenty on the earth is a fit emblem of 
that unsparing charity to all the needy, which holy 
Scripture exhorts us to practise. The fallen tree re- 
presents the state of man after death, when he can be 
no longer fruitful in good works, but must lie in the 
place where he has fallen. This is thought to teach 
us that nothing can benefit dead persons. The fol- 
lowing texts, ^o, are supposed to be of the same 

» From 360 to 870. 



XVI 



purport. " Whatsoever thy hand findeth to do, do 
it with thy might ; for there is no work, nor device, 
nor knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither 
thou goest." ' " The night cometh, when no man can 
work." 2 "To-day if ye will hear his voice, harden 
not your hearts ;" * and other passages which exhort 
us not to defer repentance and good works * 

Certainly, if praying for the departed in Christ im- 
plied that anything we could do would change the 
sinner's doom, or make atonement for an ill-spent life, 
these texts would be very much to the purpose. Butj 
since the very name " dead in Christ," (which is used 
by St. Paul, and by the force of the expression itself 
implies an intermediate state of existence,) assumes 
that those for whom we should pray have performed 
the requisitions of a Christian life, so that they are 
on the whole accepted, they do not in reality so much 
as touch the point in question.. 

Most true it is, that where the tree falls, there it 
must lie. If men die without the covenant of God's 
mercy and redemption, there are no opportunities of 
salvation reserved to the grave, no room there for 
works, or knowledge, or wisdom on the part of them 
that die. There, too, " no man may deliver his brother, 

nor make agreement unto God for him he must 

let that alone for ever." But on the other hand, 
most untrue would it be to argue from hence that 
the state of departed soids admits of no improvement 

* Eccles. ix. 10. * John, ix. 4. ' Heb. iii. 7, IS. 

* It is worth noticing, that of the preceding texts, those which 
seem to have most force are derived from the book of Ecclesiastes, 
the main scope of which is taken to be to exhibit, in the strongest 
way, the mysteriousness of the otUward appearance of things. 
Now, if this be really so, its statements would naturally bear a 
different, if not contrary, aspect when viewed as parts of a book 
having such a scope, and when taken out of that connection. Cf St. 
Ephrem Sjrrus, 



XVll 



' 



I 



1 

r 

I 



or deterioration. The Gospel certainly teaches us 
» I that Mthful servants of very different attainments 
I shall be equally saved hereafter ; but that they shall 
not be equally rewarded also, is quite as certainly im- 
plied. There are proportionate rewards in the many 
mansions of God's house for them that bring forth an 
hundred-fold, or sixty, or thirty. Some shall for 
their recompense rule over ten cities, others over five. 
For as " one star differeth from another star in glory, 
80 also is the resurrection of the dead." And, just in 
the same way, there are different degrees of rest and 
unrest, — of the brightness of the Divine light, and of 
its withdrawal in the interval between death and the 
resurrection. 1 Again, that our prayers are efficacious 
to increase the " rest and light" of departed souls, we 
need not doubt who know that they are in the hands 
of the same all-merciful God that they were while on 
earth ; that we are expressly encouraged by Him to 
pray for one another ; and that if we may gain a 
blessing for our absent friends who are yet in the 
flesh, by our prayers, so may we likewise just as well 
for them that sleep in Him. 

It can never be said with consistency, to be useless 
to pray for the dead, unless it be also useless to pray 
for incurable lunatics and idiots ; yet who would 
cease to pray to God for a dear friend or near relation 

* It seems most obvious to allude here to the opinion of a friend 
to whom this Preface is indebted for the substance of all the fore- 
going notes ; namely, that a view of the transition from glory to 
glory, incident to all finite spirits, is a stronger argument than any 
historical &cts, such as the text chiefly deals in, to set at rest all 
doubts as to the duty of Prayer for the Dead. If even the holy 
angels are capable of receiving increase of happiness through the 
repentance of one sinner (Luke, xv. 7 — 10), how much more should 
the spirits which are awaiting their perfect cbnsunmiation and bliss 
be capable of greater degrees of joy through our prayers, and 
therefore, in some sense, of suffering through our neglect. But this 
aabject ia £ar too great to be treated of in a uoU. 



\ 



XVIU 



thus hopelessly bereft of mind ? Nay, what affec- 
tionate heart would not feel itself much more than 
ever bound to pray for one so helpless, so utterly past 
all human aid ] What should one think of a scruple 
arising here, because St. Paul, in his exhortation to 
make supplication and intercession for all,^ has not 
expressly added for " lunatics and such as cannot 
pray for theijaselves ]" 

Yet on such mere negative and dangerous argu- 
ments does the opposition to the constant practice of 
the Jewish and Christian Churches, and of good and 
holy men in all ages, stand. 

Thus, because we read, " Whatsoever is not of 
faith is sin, "...hence Bucer infers that, since nothing 
can be done in faith without an express warrant horn 
Scripture, or that stands upon a conclusion evidently 
inferred from some inspired text, but prayers for the 
dead stand upon neither of these grounds, therefore 
we ought not to pray for the dead — a conclusion, 
whicli to let alone the falsehood of the premises, if 
good for anything, would forbid all prayer in cases of 
desperate idiocy or madness, as well as infant bap- 
tism, keeping holy the first day of the week, forms of 
burial, matrimony, <kc. Again, Bucer urges this text 
of St. John,2 — " he that heareth my word, and be- 
lieveth on Him that sent me, hath everlasting life, 
and shall not come into condemnation," — that is, 
" not come into (everlasting) condemnation ;" for, 
surely, this is no promise that Christians who are 
saved hereafter — that is at the Great Day — shall not 
suffer any temporary condemnation in the meanwhile 
for their lesser sins and infirmities. St. Paul ex- 
pressly says that, " when we, i. e. Christians, are 
judged, we are ch^^tened of the Lord, that we should 
not be condemned with the world." Of course it 
will be said by some, that such judgments are only 

' 1 Tim. n. 1. * C\iap. -v. ^w^fc^i^.. 



XIX 



beneficial so hx as they lead to repentance, and that ^ 
God's chastisements have this end alone in view. 
That that is a most important object of temporary 
judgments generally, is doubtless a truth ever to be 
kept in remembrance ; but if it be meant that all 
God's judgments must be followed by repentance, in 
order that they should save us from condemnation 
with the world, then in some of the cases to which St. 
Paul alludes, it is repentance in the grave, for he enu- 
merates " death" amongst God's judgments, which are 
sent to save us from an eternal doom, — an inference 
which no one wishes to draw. 

There is yet another text urged by Bucer in favour 
of his opinion : '^ Blessed are the dead which die in 
the Lord from henceforth ; yea, saith the Spirit, that 
they may rest from their labours, and their works do 
follow them." ^ Many ages before the coming of our 
Lord, Samuel, as we have seen, describes his state 
after death as a state of rest, for Saul had '' disquieted 
him to bring him up ;" yet .here a special blessing is 
pronounced on them that " die in the Lord hence- 
forth," some improvement of state, some increase of 
bliss surely, since our Lord had descended and preached 
unto " the spirits in prison," ^ and by this victory over 
Satan, had loosed the pains of death as compared 
with what they were once when sin and Satan reigned 
triumphant in the world, and no Saviour had died to 
reclaim it. From this very text, then, it appears, not 
that there cannot be many degrees of rest ; but that 
the lowest of these compared with that which they 
endure who lack it altogether, is, in the language of 
holy Scripture " rest," and the possessor of which 
contrasted with one in this world who is yet uncer- 
tain of his salvation, on the same authority " blessed." 
Can we doubt that this alone would be rest for any 
one, — to be sure of his salvation — to think that all 

' Rev. jdv. IS, « 1 Pet. m. \4. 



\ 



h'.i frir? r«r-f:>::inj Lis eivmal destinv were now no 
mi-re : that ill the lorec-C'dinirs of the mind, and 
misjivini!? ox* the heart — all the awful stir which 
we i\r^l rifin^ within us whenever we look forward to 
a iirk and •iitarv life to come — ^to ted that all these 

m 

ha 1 i: >w subsided for ever — to know that he should 
ceruiiiilv stand in the everlasting sunshine of the 
love -f God. — should not this. I say, be called rest! 
Yet within its bounds there might be — ^nay, in con- 
formity with the Divine justice, there mutt be, many 
decrrees in proportion to the works which follow, and 
draw down G'l^d's favour according to their merits. 

These negative arguments and inferences from texts 
— for it should be observed, that not one direct text 
or positive argument is so much as pretended against 
the custom of praying for the dead — being disposed 
of, what argument can be brought against the posi- 
tive facts that both the Je\vish Church, without on 
that account incurring any censure from our Lord, 
and the Christian Church from the Apostles down- 
wards, did offer up prayers " for the rest and peace of 
all those who have departed this life in God's fidth 
and fear?" " When the custom of praying for the 
dead began in the Christian Church," says a learned 
author of the present day,^ " has never been ascer- 
tained." And to be sure, if it existed in the Jewish 
before there was a Christian Church, and passed with 
all other customs of universal obligation into the 
Christian, it never will be. 

It has been the immemorial practice of the Church. 
It is most consonant to the true belief in a future 
Judt^ment to come upon all, " both the quick and the 
deady It is most agreeable to the belief in an in- 
termediate state, which all acknowledge who pray 
with our burial service, that the " departed in the 



/ 



' Pulmcr*B OrigincB Liturgicae, chap. V?. aecx. 



■X.. 



XXI 



true faith, may have (i. e, receive hereafter) perfect 
consummation and bliss." It might be well argued 
as absolutely necessary in order to realise " the com- 
munion of saints ;" for what communion have we 
with the dead in Christ, except we remember them 
in our prayers, more especially at the sacrifice of the 
blessed Eucharist, by which, above all, we are united 
most intimately as with the Head of the Body, so 
likewise with all its members, not only with them 
which are on earth but with them also which are with 
God? 

These, without any further arguments, would be 
enough to shew that " prayer for the dead is an holy 
and good thought ;" but, besides, there are not want- 
ing dear testimonies in the New Testament, that the 
dead can be benefited by the living, and that the 
intermediate state is a time of improvement. 

Consider what St. Paul alludes to, 1 Cor. xv. 29, 
where, having urged very strongly the truth of the 
doctrine of the Resurrectiouj he goes on: — "Else," 
if it were not so, " what shall they do which are bap- 
tized for the dead, if the dead rise not at all ? why 
are they then baptized for the dead V From which 
it has been argued with much plausibility, that what- 
ever that custom of baptizing for the dead, to which 
St. Paul alludes, might have been, at least so much 
is clear, that there are some ways in which the living 
may benefit the state of the departed ; and it ought 
to be observed, that St. Paul here, similarly with the 
author of the 2 Maccabees, appeals to the regard the 
living have for the dead, in proof of the doctrine of 
the resurrection. 

Again; many, with Bishop Taylor, are of opinion 
that St. Paul, in his prayer for Onesiphorus, is certainly 
referring to a dead person. " The Lord" are his 
/ wordsj (in bis last epistle just before lais "mailyt^^^a^^ \ 

<^ \ 



xxu 



" give mercy unto the house of Onesiphorus ; for he 
oft refreshed me, and was not ashamed of my chain : 
but, when he was in Rome, he sought me out very 
diligently, and found me. The Lord grant unto him 
that he may find mercy of the Lord in that day : and 
in how many things he ministered unto me at Ephe- 
sus, thou knowest very well." ^ And, again, amongst 
the salutations at the end, he greets '* the household 
of Onesiphorus :" leaving, to say the least, a strong 
presumption that Onesiphorus himself is omitted be- 
cause he was no longer in the flesh, and therefore no 
longer the subject of earthly salutation. 

Again, in the Epistle to the Philippians : " Being 
confident of this very thing, that he which hath begun 
a good work in you will perform it until the day" — 
not of their death — which consistently with the belief 
that afterwards no improvement can take place^ 
might most reasonably be expected ; but " of Jesus 
Christ," ^ i, e. the great Day of Judgment, all the 
time between whiles being included as that during 
which God might perform or make perfect the good 
work He had already begun in them. 

To the same purpose are many other texts. — 
" Waiting for the coming of our Lord Jesus Christ : 
who shall also confirm you unto the end, that ye may 
be blameless in the day of our Lord Jesus Christ."' 
" That ye may be sincere and without offence till the 
day of Christ."* " The very God of peace sanctify 
you wholly ; and I pray God your whole spirit and 
soul and body be preserved blameless unto the coming 
of our Lord Jesus Christ. Faithful is He that calleth 
you, who also will do it."* "I give thee charge ... 
that thou keep this commandment without spot, un- 
rebukable, until the appearing of our Lord Jesus 

» 2 Tim. i. 16—18. « Phil. i. 6. » 1 Cor. I 7, 8. 

* Phil. i. 10. « 1 Thesa. v. 23-4. 



XXlll 

Christ/** In all these passages, the time of sanctifica- 

tion is represented as extending to the »great Day of 

Judgment. 

In connection with these latter texts, too, should be 
considered in what sort of state or frame of mind a 
multitude of good persons die. Charity repels the 
notion, that because of the imperfections and infir- 
mities which still cleave to them, they are doomed to 
A common lot with the wicked and impenitent. On 
the other hand, God's word is absolute that into the 
city of the heavenly Jerusalem " there shall in no 
wise enter anything that defileth." It has been the 
doctrine of the Church therefore, first, that the inter- 
mediate state is the time in which sincere but im- 
perfect Christians receive that final purification which 
we see so many on their deathbeds need ; too good in- 
deed to be lost entirely, yet unfit to enter into the im- 
mediate presence of Him, for the sight of whom " ho- 
liness" is so emphatically declared necessary by the 
Apostle ; and, secondly, that their souls in this state 
are assisted by the suffrages of the faithful. 

Since the object of the following Prayers and OflSces 
is to supply members of the Church of England with 
a manual of devotion for the dead, it is right here to 
state, that they contain nothing contrary to the doc- 
trine or discipline of our Church. The Church of 
England has expressed no formal opinion indeed in 
&vour of prayers for the dead, such as those which 
follow, either in her Canons or Articles ; but neither 
has she said anything against them. At the time of 
the Reformation they were universal, and nothing 
being said against a custom then prevalent, and which 
could not have escaped notice, is tantamount to at 
least a silent approval ; and this, moreover, is con- 
firmed by the fact that the first Common Prayer 

» See 1 Tim. vi. 13, U. 



XXIV 



Book of King Edward VI., drawn up by the same 
persons who prepared the present, contsans severa] 
of the prayers which will be found in the following 
manual. Now, the authority which ratified the use 
of the present book, declared of the former, that i< 
'^ contained nothing but what was agreeable to the 
Word of God and the Primitive Church."^ 

Hence in the Church of England, many not onlj 
of her greatest divines, but also of others whose names 
we think worthy of all respect and honour, have used 
prayers for their departed friends and relativea 
Amongst whom, in later years, may be mentioned Dr. 
Johnson, who ever remembered in his prayers tht 
soul of his deceased wife. 

And yet more recently, within the last few years, 
judgment was given in the Ecclesiastical Court by Sii 
H. Jenner, in the cause of "Woolfrey v, the Vicar oi 
Carisbrooke," by which it wasjudici^y declared that 
" Prayer for the Dead is not contrary to the Article! 
or Canons of the Church of England ; that it wai 
generally practised by the Christians of the mow 
early ages, who prayed that the souls of the dead * maj 
have rest and quiet in the interval between death anc 
the resurrection ; and that at the Last Day they maj 
receive the perfect consummation of bliss.'" 



It will now [be well to say something respectin| 
the antiquity, use, and intention of the following Ser 
vices. And, first, of the Office for the Dead. 

The date of the compilation of the Office for th- 
Dead, as it has come down to us, is uncertain. Al 
that is known is, that it is very old, and, in substanc 
at least, has the sanction of primitive antiquity. 

* See Pamphlet entitled " The Doctrine of the Catholic Churc 
in England on the Holy Eucharist,** p. 10. Parker, Oxford, 1841 



XXV 



It is proper to be used especially while the corpse 
remains unburied, and on the third, seventh, thirtieth, 
and anniversary days of the death or burial. On the 
third day, it may be remembered, that our Lord's re- 
surrection took place ; on the seventh, that Joseph 
and his brethren "made a mourning seven days for 
their father Jacob ;" and that Ecclesiasticus says : 
" Seven days do men mourn for him that is dead." ^ 
" Thirty days they mourned for Aaron, even all the 
house of Israel." 2 " And the children of Israel wept 
for Moses in the plains of Moab thirty days."' Anni- 
versaries are too obvious to need any comment ; and 
they are useful to supply deficiencies. 

Concerning the Office itself, it will be observed by 
those who are familiar with the Breviary, that it has 
neither the lesser hours nor second vespers ; that it 
begins at once without the invocation of Divine as- 
sistance, and that afterwards the Gloria Patri, the 
benedictions and every other formulary indicative of 
joy, is omitted : for " as a tale out of season, so is 
music in mourning :"* in these latter respects re- 
sembling the Offices commemorative of our Lord's 
Passion, from which it yet differs in the omission of 
second vespers and the lesser hours, to mark its in- 
feriority in point of solemnity and importance. 

As regards the intention of the Psalms, they seem 
to be most rightly said in the person of the de- 
parted. The five Psalms of Vespers are supposed to 
deprecate God's mercy through our Lord's five wounds 
for whatever the dead have sinned by any of their 
five senses. The Song of the Blessed Virgin has re- 
gard to her intercession for them. In Psalm cxlvi. 
the departure of the soul and the return of the body 
to its earth is commemorated. 

The three Psalms of each Noctum may refer to 

* Ecclus. xxii. 12. * Num. xx. 29. 

* Dent, xxxiv. 8. * Ecclus. xxii. 6. 



XXVI 



] 



sins of thought, word, and deed; to the eyer-blessed 
l^rinity, and other mysteries. 

The five Psalms of Lauds have the same object 
as those of Vespers. The Song of Zacharias returns 
thanks to God for the salvation with which " He 
hath visited and redeemed his people," performed 
" the mercy promised to our forefathers," and " the 
oath which He sware to our forefather Abraham." 
Again, it gives thanks for deliverance "from ene- 
mies and fear," and for giving " light and peace 
to them that sit in darkness and in the shadow 
of death." 

Tlie 1 30th or Gradual Psalm, De profundisy is said 
in the person of one desiring to ascend to God, and 
l)oing delivered from the depths of hell and the jaws 
of death, to attain to redemption " from all his sins," 
through the mercy of the Lord. 

The Gradual Psalms — including all those we find 
in the Psalter between the 119th and the 135th — are 
said to have been so called originally, from their being 
sung on the fifteen steps of the Temple. Or, as 
others are of opinion, because the singers raised their 
voice by degrees from the first to the last. Or, again, 
because they were chanted on the return from the 
Babylonish Captivity, in allusion to the gradual ap- 
proach to the holy city. 

Any way they are most suitable to express the 
feelings of those whom the Lord has delivered from a 
state of slavery and bondage, and is conducting into 
Ilis rest. Wliether we keep the idea of the return 
from captivity, or of the entrance into the holy 
place, of either or both, before us, they will be found 
very fit to be said for, or in the persons of, those whom 
God has " delivered from the burden of the flesh," 
and is preparing within His secret mansions for "per- 
fect consummation and bliss, both in body and soul, 
in His eternal and everlasting glory." 



XXVll 



These fifteen Psalms are divided into three por- 
tions of five each, and represent, i that we only arrive 
at the perfection of goodness or holiness by degrees. 
The five first are repeated without the usual doxology, 
in place of which " Grant them, Lord, eternal 
rest,"* &c. is said as in the Office for the Dead, and 
they are concluded with a form of prayer for the ab- 
solution of the departed souls. The next division 
advances to a more joyous tone, and henceforth the 
usual doxology is added at the end of each Psalm. 
In the concluding prayers also, there is an ascending 
scale towards the language of complete justification 
and holiness. Hence the first division is for be- 
ginners, the second for proficients, and the third for 
the perfect. 

The Gradual Psalms, in the Latin Church, are 
added to the customary service on the Wednesdays in 
Lent, to mark those days with extraordinary devo- 
tion, for in them we are taught the gradual ascent to 
the perfection of the spiritual life. More anciently, 
they were recited every day in Lent, and the monks 
of Cluny used them every day in the year. The 
Greek Church recites them every day in Lent except 
Saturdays and Sundays. Whatever may be the his- 
torical reason of the name, it has special reference 
spiritually to the mystical ascent of the mind. We 
cannot arrive at the highest degree of charity, except 
by steps ; and these Psalms, therefore, are compared 
by divines to the ladder of love which the patriarch 
Jacob beheld in his sleep. 

They are divided into three portions, to answer to 
the threefold division commonly ascribed to the an- 
gels, viz. to purify, to illuminate and to make per- 
fect ; and the corresponding division of men seeking 
perfection in the spiritual or inward life, viz. into 
beginners, proficients, and perfect. 

' Bona de Div. P8alinodi&. 



XXTlll 

The first division of the Gradual P 
respects beginners, and the object of thei: 
purification. Their first step is to avoi( 
sin. 2. To avoid all venial sin. 3. 
riches and honours. 4. To restrain al 
sires. 5. To give up private judgmen 
own will. Such are the notes of a pu 
and to each of these steps the Psalms of 
are to be applied consecutively. 

The second division contains the steps ( 
whose aim is illumination. 1. To acq 
virtues. 2. To be a pattern of them t( 
To set forth the ways of righteousness 
4. To shew themselves perfectly humble 
To bear derision and detraction patientl} 

The last division describes the steps of 
and, in conclusion, leads to the height ( 
itself. 1. The love of prayer. 2. The 
purity of intention. 3. To do the w 
Spirit with great zeal, and to pursue 
which is good with impetuosity. 4. 
will but God's will. 5. To be united 
the most intimate and indissoluble bond 

" Let so many of us, then, as recite t 
endeavour, by a diligent consideration 
make ourselves thoroughly acquainted 
sublime meaning, that while we recite 
weakness of the fiesh being laid aside, w( 
from step to step to their very summit, 
whom we seek, to whom we are going, ^ 
sire, and to whom belongs all honour i 
for ever and ever." ^ 

The Seven Penitential Psalms are, in 
the 6th, 32nd, 38th, 51st, 102nd, 130th 
The antiquity of their use is shewn by 

* Bona de diy. Psal. 



XXIX 

related of St. Augustine. When Hippo was besieged 
hj the Vandals^ and its saintly bishop lay dying 
within it> he commanded these Psalms '^ as ihose 
which were received from all antiquity," to be written 
on a tablet, and placed on the wall before his eyes, 
that by continually reading them he might prepare 
himself for his last struggle with the devil. They 
frequently occur, too, in the ancient Roman Peni- 
tential. 

They are said, says Cardinal Bona, by the Cistercian 
monks every Friday in procession after Prime — a 
custom which, though adopted in the first instance 
with special reference to the Crusades and the re- 
covery of the Holy Sepulchre, is continued for the 
sake of penitential discipline. St. Bernard^ said them 
habitually every night for the soul of his mother. 
The Western Church generally appoints them to be 
recited every Friday in Lent before the Litany. The 
Church of England on Ash Wednesday only. 

Many mystical reasons are given by divines for the 
number of the Psabns. It will be more serviceable, 
perhaps, here, to explain the titles which are found 
prefixed to them either in the original Hebrew as it 
has come down to us, or in the Greek and Latin ver- 
sions, and to say something of their respective in- 
tentions. 

The first is« " To the End," that is, continually, 
or until perfection is attained. In this Psalm, we 
hear the voice of the penitent first turning to God on 
his discovery of the weariness of sin, and the empti- 
ness of this world's vanities ; he deprecates the seve- 
rity of God's wrath, — implores His mercy, — relates his 
miserable condition in his recent course of life, — ab- 

' See the recent Life of St. Stephen Harding. 
' In the English version it is " To the chief musician ;" in the 
LXX. and Vulgate Eis ri rix^, *« In finem." 



XXX 

jures all fellowship with the workers of iniquity, — 
and expresses his full trust in God's mercy. " 
Lord, rebuke me not in thine indignation, neither 
chasten me in thy displeasure... My beauty is gone 
for very trouble... A way from me all ye that work 
vanity.. » The Lord hath heard my petition ; and the 
Lord will receive my prayer." 

The second derives its title of " A Psalm of David, 
giving instruction," from its answering a question 
put in another, the 19th Psalm, " Who can tell how 
oft he offendeth V "I will inform thee and teach 
thee"*... In this Psalm the penitent goes on to speak 
of the blessedness of him " whose unrighteousness is 
forgiven, and whose sin is covered :" he describes his 
own wretchedness while he hardened his heart against 
confession — " while I held my tongue my bones con- 
sumed away through my daily complaining :" the in- 
stantaneous comfort he obtained from humbly con- 
fessing his sins — "I said, I will confess my sins imto 
the Lord ; and so Thou forgavest the wickedness of 
my sin :" and he declares that, therefore, " every one 
that is godly" should seek the Lord in the acceptable 
time, and escape the final troubles of the wicked. 
On the other hand, in the last four verses, God ad- 
dresses the penitent, promises him guidance, — warns 
him against relapse " like the horse and mule, which 
have no understanding," — foretells that great plagues 
remain for the ungodly, while " mercy embraceth on 
every side whoso putteth his trust in the Lord," — 
wherefore he congratulates " in the Lord the righteous 
and true-hearted." 

The third Psalm takes its title of " A Psalm oi 
David to bring to remembrance," from its being 

' The meaning of the title of this Psahn is much plainer in the 
Latin, where it is '* Intellectus." In the 19th Psalm we find 
" Delicta quis intelligitV **Intellectum tibi dabo et instruam te,'' 
is the answer in the d2nd. 



XXXI 



written by David to keep his sin ever in remem- 
brance, according to that in the 51st Psalm, " My 
sin is ever before me." For the less we remember 
our sins, the more God remembers them ; and the 
more we remember them, the less does He. This 
Psalm begins like the first, with deprecating, in the 
person of the penitent, God's extreme wrath and dis- 
pleasure. " Put me not to rebuke, Lord, in thine 
anger;..." and describes his wretchedness more at 
length than heretofore, — his sickness of body, his 
anguish of mind, the unkindness of friends, and the 
snares of the wicked. At length, deserted by all 
human aid, he is silent, trusting in God his only Sa- 
viour. " In thee, Lord, have I put my trust : thou 
shalt answer forme, Lord my God." Then, finally, 
rejoicing in God, he implores the steady continuance 
of His assistance : " Forsake me not, Lord my God. 
... Haste thee to help me, Lord God of my salva- 
tion." 

The fourth Psalm, which is the 51st, is a perfect 
model of sorrowful expression for sin, and the mas- 
terpiece of penitential services. Its title is like the 
first, « To the End ;" but adds, that it is " a Psalm 
of Bavid, when Nathan the prophet came to him after 
he had gone in to Bathsheba." It contains three 
parts: — 1. Confession. 2. Prayer for grace ; and 3. 
Promises of contrition. First, the penitent gives 
utterance to the bitterest compunction and the deep- 
est humility ; " Have mercy upon me, God, after 
thy great goodness : according to the multitude of 
thy mercies, do away mine offences...! acknowledge 
my faults, and my sin is ever before me," &c. Then 
he prays for pardon and grace : " Turn thy face from 
my sins... Make me a clean heart... Oast me not 
away from thy presence... Give me the comfort of 
thy help again... Deliver me from blood-guiltiness." 
Then, Ml of confidence in God's mercy, he promisea 



xxxu 



that which was mystically intended by the bullocks 
and burnt offerings of the old law — " a troubled 
spirit, a broken and contrite heart, and the sacrifice 
of righteousness." 

The fifth, the 102nd Psalm, is the " Oratio Paupe- 
ris," or " Prayer of the afflicted, when he is over- 
whelmed, and poureth out his complaint before the 
Lord." The penitent now pours out his soul in prayer 
to God : " Hear my prayer, Lord, and let my cry 
come unto thee. Hide not thy face from me. . .0 hear 
me, and that right soon." He relates his miseries 
and afflictions at length, that God may have compas- 
sion on him at last : " My bones will scarce cleave to 
my skin... I have watched, and am even as it were a 
sparrow... My days are gone like a shadow ; and I am 
withered like grass." Then he turns to the thought 
of God's eternity : " Thou, Lord, shalt endure foi 
ever !" and losing the sense of his own troubles in thai 
boundless ocean, he pursues his thought to the sure 
arrival at length of the Almighty's time for shewing 
mercy. " When the heathen shall fear thy name 
and all the kings of the earth thy glory," — when hi 
shall " turn himself unto the prayer of the poor des- 
titute," — when all created things else shall fail bul 
the children of the blessed and the seed of the saints 
which alone shall stand fast in eternal rest and th( 
perpetual brightness of Divine light. 

The sixth, the 130th Psalm, is one of the Gradua 
Psalms, or " A Song or Psalm of degrees," the mean 
ing of the title of which is explained above. It her( 
teaches the penitent that he must not stand still, bui 
go on from virtue to virtue, and from grace t( 
grace ; that he must " look for the Lord ... wai' 
for him ... trust in Him," till he reaches that grea 
Day of final absolution " from all his sins," and h 
raised to that height whence there is no relapse 
and where, at length, those blessed words applj 



XXXUl 

in their fullest sense : '^Your joy no man taketh 
from you." * 

We come now to the seventh and last Psalm, which 
is the 143rd — "A Psalm of David,'' when he was pur- 
sued by his son Absalom," by which we are taught 
that, aB;er the external foes of the penitent have been 
overcome, there remain still " they of his own house- 
hold," — " the law in our members," — the unnatural 
Absalom rising against his parent. Here, then, again, 
the penitent prays the Lord to " hear " him, not to 
judge, but rather to pronounce over him those blessed 
words : ** Son,... thy sins be forgiven thee." He com- 
plains of his enemy — the enemy which has so long 
"persecuted his soul ;" and of his own desolation of 
spirit. Yet, for his comfort, he recalls to mind the 
redemption God has now of old time sent to His 
people, and stretching forth his hands to Him after 
the pattern of Him who died on the cross, implores 
speedy salvation. He prays that he may know God's 
will : that he may be led " into the land of righteous- 
ness," be quickened, and rescued from his troubles 
and all the snares of the enemy, inasmuch as he both 
is and ever will be to the end, God's faithful " ser- 
vant." 

Learned men are of opinion, that so far back as 
the time of our Lord, short supplications were used 
in Jerusalem, in which Hosannah was frequently 
repeated, and hence the introduction of litanies — 
a word of general meaning, since a few repeti- 
tions of " Kyrie Eleison" before the Lord's Prayer 
are so called, as well as the longer forms of prayer 
more commonly understood by that name. But the 
institution of particular days for using litanies in 
procession, have, for the most part, assignable dates ; 

» John xvi. 22. 

' As we are told by the LXX. and Vulgate tranBlation8. 



XXXIV 

as that on the Feast of St. Mark is ascrihed to St 
Gregory the Great, a.d. 590, and those on the thre< 
Eogation days to St. Mamertus, bishop at Vienna 
A.D. 452. The special interpositions of Providence 
to allay plagues, wars, and earthquakes, and to convert 
heathen nations, as, for example, the Saxons, have 
been amongst the fruit of such deprecations of God's 
wrath. The lists of the saints which used to be 
invoked in England on the several days of the week, 
have been retained at the end of the Litany as 
suitable to a work, the chief object of which is to 
assist in restoring the reverence and regard due to 
them who sleep in Christ. 

" The Commendation of a Dying Person," " the 
Accompaniment to the Burial Service," and the other 
prayers, offices, and lessons from the Scriptures, re- 
quire no further explanation than the perusal of 
them and the directory for their use supply. 

The Meditations on the Four Last Things, which 
are subjoined, have a preface at the place explanatory 
of their connexion with the foregoing Prayers, <kc., 
together with niles for using them, which renders it 
needless to say more here than that the Editor, in 
both rules and meditations, has been less studious of 
originality than of usefulness. In the rules for 
meditation especially, though responsible for the 
arrangement, he lays claim to nothing further. 

That it may please God to bless this humble at- 
tempt to restore amongst members of our Church 
the christian practice of Prayer for the Faithful 
Departed, to the comfort of those holy souls, and the 
conversion and edification of us who remain in this 
vain and transitory world, is the hearty desire and 
earnest prayer of its compiler. 

W. F. W. 

London, 
Septuagesima, 1845. 



I 



TABLE OF CONTENTS. 



I^RAFikCB ■ • • • • • 

Office for the Dead 

Praters from the Ancient English Office 

Gradual Psalms .... 

Penitential Psalms 

Litany ..... 

Commendation of a departing Soul 

A Form op Prater for the Dead 

Proper Collects, Epistles, and Gospels 

^ Accompaniment to the Burial Service 



Preface, containing Rules for Meditation . 

Meditation ]. On Death 

„ 2. On Preparation for Death 

„ 3. On the Means of Preparing for 

Death .... 

„ 4. On Particular Judgment 

„ 5. On General, or Great Day of, 

Judgment 

„ 6. On Hell 

- 7. On Heaven 



PAOB 
V 

1 
40 
42 
52 
61 
72 
85 
86 
90 

101 
107 
111 

116 
121 

126 
133 
137 



I 




^n ®m'ce fot fift Mtsca, 



This office is intended to he used, eaxept during the season of 
Easter, on the first of every month, urdess one of ike greater Festivcds 
happens to fall on that day; in which case it should be postponed to 
tfie day following. In Advent and Lent it should be said on the 
Monday in every week, when there is no such interference ; esccepting 
the Monday in Holy Week, Most properly it is said after the 
service for the day, i. e. Vespers after Vespers, and Matins after 
Matins; bitt it may be used by individuals as opportunity allows. 



AT VESPERS. 

B^n immediately from the Aniiphon. 

Antiphon. I will walk before the Lord. 

PsAL. cxvi. 1 to 9. Dileod quoniam. 

I am well pleased : that the Lord hath heard the 
voice of my prayer. 

That he hath inclined his ear unto me : therefore 
will I call upon him as long as I live. 

The snares of death compassed me round about : 
and the pains of hell gat hold upon me. 

I shall find trouble and heaviness, and I will call 
upon the Name of the Lord : Lord, I beseech thee, 
deliver my soul. 

Gracious is the Lord, and righteous ; yea, our God 
is merciftil. 

The Lord preserveth the simple : I was in misery 
and he helped me. 

B 



2] Sin a^f&tt tot t^t Btats, 

Turn again then unto thy rest, my s 
the Lord hath rewarded thee. 

And why ? thou hast delivered my sc 
death : mine eyes from tears, and my f 
falling. 

I will walk before the Lord : in the Ian 
living. 

l_At the end of each Psalm^ instead of^ Glory he to 
^c," is repeated^'] 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual ; shine upon thei 

Ant. I will walk before the Lord in the 
the living. 



Ant. Wo is me. 

PsAL. cxx. Ad Dominum, 

When I was in trouble I called upon th 
and he heard me. 

Deliver my soul, Lord, from lying 1 
from a deceitful tongue. 

What reward shall be given or done u 
thou false tongue ; even mighty and sharj 
with hot burning coals. 

Wo is me, that I am constrained to dv 
Mesech : and to have my habitation among 
of Kedar. 

My soul hath long dwelt among them : 
enemies unto peace. 

I labour for peace, but when I speak ui 
thereof : they make them ready to battle. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon then 

Ant. Wo is me, that I am constrained 
with Mesech. 



an H^f&tt tot t^t Healr. [3 



Ant. The Lord shall preserve thee. 

PsAL. cxxi. Levavi ocuios. 

I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills : from 
whence cometh my help. 

My help cometh even from the Lord : who hath 
made heaven and earth. 

He will not suflfer thy foot to be moved : and he 
that keepeth thee will not sleep. 

Behold he that keepeth Israel : shall neither slum- 
ber nor sleep. 

The Lord himself is thy keeper : the Lord is thy 
defence upon thy right hand. ^ ^ 

So that the sun shall not bum thee by day ; 
neither the moon by night. 

The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil : yea, it 
is even he that shall keep thy soul. 

The Lord shall preserve thy going out and thy 
coming in ; from this time forth for evermore. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual ; shine upon them. 

Ant. The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil : 
yea, it is even he that shall keep thy soul. 



Ant. If thou, Lord. 

PsAL. cxxz. De profundis. 

Out of the deep have I called unto thee, Lord : 
Lord, hear my voice. 

let thine ears consider well : the voice of my 
complaint. 

If thou, Lord, wilt be extreme to mark what is 
done amiss : Lord, who may abide it ? 

For there is mercy with thee : therefore shalt thou 
be feared. 



4] Sin it^f&tt for ti^e Idealr. 

I look for the Lord ; my soul doth wait for 
in his word is my trust. 

My soul fleeth unto the Lord : before the n: 
watch ; I say before the morning watch. 

Israel, trust in the Lord, for with the 
there is mercy : and with him is plenteous r 
tion. 

And he shall redeem Israel : from all his si 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. If thou, Lord, wilt be extreme to mar 
is done amiss : Lord, who may abide it ? 



Ant. Despise not. " 

PsAL. cxxxviii. Confitebor tibi. 

I will give thanks unto thee, Lord, w 
whole heart ; even before the gods will I sin| 
unto thee. 

I will worship toward thy holy temple, an 
thy Name, because of thy loving kindness and 
for thou hast magnified thy Name and tl 
above all things. 

When I called upon thee, thou heardest n 
enduedst my soul with much strength. 

All the kings of the earth shall praise 
Lord : for they have heard the words of thy : 
Yea, they shall sing in the ways of the Lor 
great is the glory of the Lord. 

For though the Lord be high, yet hath h( 
unto the lowly ; as for the proud, he beholde 
afar off. 

Though I walk in the midst of trouble, ^ 
thou refresh me : thou shalt stretch forth t 
upon the furiousness of mine enemies, and t 
hand shall save me. 



an H^f&tt for tQe IDealr. [5 



The Lord shall make good his loving kindness to- 
ward me : yea, thy mercy, Lord, endureth for ever; 
despise not then the works of thine own hands. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Despise not, Lord, the works of thine own 
hands. 

. I heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me. 
U Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord. 



Ant. All. 

LuKK i. 46. Magnifkai. 

My soul doth magnify the Lord : and my spirit 
hath rejoiced in God my Saviour. 

For he hath regarded : the lowliness of his hand- 
maiden. 

For behold from henceforth : all generations shall 
call me blessed. 

For he that is mighty hath magnified me : and 
holy is his Name. 

And his mercy is on them that fear him : through- 
out all generations. 

He hath shewed strength with his arm : he hath 
scattered the proud in the imagination of their 
hearts. 

He hath put down the mighty from their seat : 
and hath exalted the humble and meek. 

He hath filled the hungry with good things : and 
the rich he hath sent empty away. 

He remembering his mercy hath holpen his ser- 
vant Israel ; as he promised to our forefathers, Abra- 
ham and his seed, for ever. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 



6] fSLn 0tKte tot t^t SBealr. 

Ant. All that the Father giveth me shall come to 
me ; and him that cometh to me, I will in no wise 
cast out. 

[The following Prayers, ^c. are said^ both ai Vespers and Lamds, 

kneeling."] 

Our Father. 

[The rest is said sUenUy untU the two last petitiom,] 

y. And lead us not into temptation, 
B;?. But deliver us from evil. 



The foUovjing Psalm " Lauda, anima mea " at Vespers, and the 
Psalm " De profundis^'* in the corresponding place at Lattds, are 
not said on the day of Commem^yration (fall the Faiih/ul Depart- 
ed (i. e. All Souls'* Day, Nov. 2), nor on the day of the deaOi or 
interment of a Departed Person. Otherwise they are altvays said. 

PsAL. cxlvi. Lauda, anima mea. 

Praise the Lord, my soul ; while I live will I 
praise the Lord : yea, as long as I have any being I 
will sing praises unto my God. 

put not your trust in princes, nor in any child 
of man : for there is no help in them. 

For when the breath of man goeth forth he shall 
turn again to his earth : and then all his thoughts 
perish. 

Blessed is he that hath the God of Jacob for his 
help : and whose hope is in the Lord his God. 

Who made heaven and earth, the sea, and all that 
therein is : who keepeth his promise for ever ; 

Who helpeth them to right that suffer wrong : 
who feedeth the hungry. 

The Lord looseth men out of prison : the Lord 
giveth sight to the blind. 

The Lord helpeth them that are fallen : the Lord 
careth for the righteous. 



fSLn i&f&tt for tQe Btati, [7 

The Lord careth for the strangers; he defendeth 
the fatherless and widow : as for the way of the un- 
godly, he tumeth it upside down. 

The Lord thy God, Sion, shall be King for ever- 
more : and throughout all generations. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

y . From the gate of hell, 
I^. Deliver their souls, Lord. 

y. May they rest in peace. 
I^. Amen. 

Lord, hear my prayer. 
U And let my cry come unto thee. 

y . The Lord be with you, 
I^. And with thy spirit. 

[The last y and I\? are said only when the Reader is a 
dergymanJ] 



The rest is the same at Vespers and Lauds. 



God, who amongst Apostolic Priests hast raised 
up thy servants, iV. to stand in the dignity of Bishops 
or Priests, grant, we beseech thee, that they may also 
be gathered together with them in everlasting fel- 
lowship. 

God, the giver of pardon, and lover of the salva- 
tion of all mankind : we beseech thee of thy great 
mercy to grant that our brethren, relations, and be- 
nefactors, who have departed this life, the blessed 
Mary, ever Virgin, with all thy Saints, interceding, 
may come to the fellowship of everlasting bliss. 

God, the Creator and Redeemer of all the faith- 
ful, grant to the souls of thy servants and handmaids 
the remission of all their sins : that through pious 



8] nn ^f&tt for ti^e Beatt, 

supplications they may obtain the pardon tl 
always desired. Who livest and reignest for 
ever. 

I^. Amen. 

[But on the day (^Commemoration of all the Faiihfm 
when this last Prayer is used alone, it is said thus : 

Who livest and reignest with the Fathe 
unity of the Holy Ghost, God for ever and e^ 

a^n t!|e Bav[ of t!|e lEntmnent of a l^epartetr 

Absolve, Lord, we beseech thee, the soi 
servant [or handmaid] i\r., that being dea< 
world he may live to thee : and whatboever 
committed through the frailty of the fies 
earthly conversation, do thou by the grac 
most merciful goodness wipe away. Thrc 
Lord. 

a^u tOe ^nntbersars of t^e mmt. 

God, the Lord of all mercy and for 
grant unto the souls of thy servants [or har 
the anniversary of whose interment we comn: 
the place of refreshment, the blessedness of ; 
the brightness of thy divine light. Thrc 
Lord. 

11/ the Anniversary be kept in memory of erne perse 
prayer should he said in the singular number, '\ 

Jfnx a I3t0top Jiepattelr. 

God, who amongst Apostolic Priests hi 
up thy servant i\r. to stand in the dign 
Bishop, grant, we beseech thee, that he maj 
gathered together with them in everlasting fe 
Through our Lord. 

[For a Priest the word " Priest " instead of Bishop is 

[For Brothers and Sisters, near Friends and Bene 
prayer " O God, the giver of pardon " is said as al 



An OiBcf tat tit IBcailr. [9 

God, who hast commanded us to honour Father 
and Mother, be merciftd to the souls of my Father 
and Mother, and forgive them all their sins. Grant 
also that I may see them in the bliss of eternal glory. 
Through our Lord. 

ffnt a SBepartelr filSUm. 

Bow down thine ear, Lord, to our prayers, who 
humbly supplicate thy mercy ; and grant to the soul 
of thy servant, iV., whom thou hast called out of this 
world, a place in the region of peace and light, and 
make him the associate of thy Saints. Through our 
Lord. 

Jfot a Bt^atitti Wioman. 

We beseech thee, Lord, according to thy great 
goodness shew mercy on the soul of thine handmaid- 
en iV. : and restore her, now delivered from the cor- 
ruptions of this mortal life, to the inheritance of ever- 
lasting salvation. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, who 
Hveth and reigneth with thee in the unity of the 
Holy Ghost, God for ever and ever. 

I^. Amen. 

Grant them, Lord ; eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

. May they rest in peace. 
Amen. 




10] an 0ffice fdr t1(e Idealr. 



AT MATINS. 

dTl^e inbitators* 

The King, to whom all live : come, let u 
ship. 

The King, to whom all live : come, let u 
ship. 

PsAL. zcv. Venite, eandtemw Domino. 

come, let us sing unto the Lord, let us h 
rejoice in the strength of our salvation : let ui 
before his presence with thanksgiving, and 
ourselves glad in him with Psalms. 

The King, to whom all live : come, let u 
ship. 

For the Lord is a great God, and a great 
above all gods : in his hand are all the con 
the earth, and the strength of the hills is his a 

come, let us worship. 

The sea is his, and he made it, and his hanc 
pared the dry land : come, let us worship, a: 
down, and kneel before the Lord our Maker. 
is the Lord our God ; and we are the people of h 
ture, and the sheep of his hand. 

The King, to whom all live : come, let u 
ship. 

To-day if ye will hear his voice, harden no 
hearts : as in the provocation, and as in the 
temptation in the wilderness : when your i 
tempted me, proved me, and saw my works, 

come, let us worship. 

Forty years long was I grieved with this g 
tion, and said : It is a people that do err in 
hearts, for they have not known my ways 



[ 



an OiBcf to tit IMti. [11 



whom I sware in 1x17 wrath that thej should not 
enter into my rest. 

The King, to whom all live : come, let us wor- 
ship. 

Grant them, Lord ; eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

come, let us worship. 

The King, to whom all live : come, let us wor- 
ship. 

[7^ Inmtaiory is said only on the Day of the Commemoration of 
all the Faithful Departed, and on the day of the interment of a 
Departed Person : on which days the three fMowing Noctums 
are said, and ^ Arttiphons doubled, i. c. said infvU at the begin- 
ning as well as at the end of their respective Psalms. At other 
times the Aniiphons are said as below, and only one Noctum, toge- 
ther with Lauds, in this order. On Monday and Thursday the 
first Noctum : on Tuesday and Friday the second Noctum : on 
Wednesday and Saturday the third Noctum, 

In tl^e 5t0t ^octutn. 

ITobe used Monday and ITiursday.l 

Ant. Make plain. 

PsAL. y. Verba mea auribus. 

Ponder my words, Lord : consider my medita- 
tion. 

hearken thou unto the voice of my calling, my 
King and my God : for unto thee will I make my 
prayer. 

My voice shalt thou hear betimes, Lord : early 
in the morning will I direct my prayer unto thee, 
and will look up. 

For thou art the God that hast no pleasure in 
wickedness : neither shall any evil dwell with thee. 

Such as be foolish shall not stand in thy sight : 
for thou hatest all them that work vanity. 




12] an a^f&ct iot if^t HBtati. 

Thou shalt destroy them that speak leasing : the 
Lord will abhor both the bloodthirsty and deceitful 
man. 

But, as for me, I will come into thine house, even 
upon the multitude of thy mercy : and in thy fear 
will I worship toward thy holy temple. 

Lead me, Lord, in thy righteousness, because 
of mine enemies : make thy way plain before my 
j^ce. 

For there is no faithfulness in his mouth : their 
inward parts are very wickedness. 

Their throat is an open sepulchre : they flatter 
with their tongue. 

Destroy thou them, God; let them perish 
through their own imaginations : cast them out in 
the multitude of their ungodliness, for they have re- 
belled against thee. 

And let all them that put their trust in thee re- 
joice : they shall ever be giving of thanks, because 
thou defendest them ; they that love thy Name shall 
be joyful in thee. 

For thou. Lord, wilt give thy blessing unto the 
righteous : and with thy favourable kindness wilt 
thou defend him as with a shield. 

Grant them, Lord ; eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Make thy way plain, Lord, my God, before 
my face. 

Ant. Turn thee. 

PsAL. vi. Domine, ne in furore. 

Lord, rebuke me not in thine indignation : nei- 
ther chasten me in thy displeasure. 
. Have mercy upon me, Lord, for I am weak : 
/ Lord, heal me, for my bones are vexed. I 



an OtSce tot tit ItoH. [13 



My soul also is sore troubled ^ but, Lord, how long 
wilt thou punish me 1 

Turn thee, Lord, and deliver my soul : save 
me, for thy mercy's sake. 

For in death no man remembereth thee : and who 
will give thee thanks in the pit 1 

I am weary of my groaning ; every night wash I 
my bed : and water my couch with my tears. 

My beauty is gone for very trouble : and worn 
away because of all mine enemies. 

Away from me, all ye that work vanity : for the 
Lord hath heard the voice of my weeping. 

The Lord hath heard my petition : the Lord will 
receive my prayer. 

All mine enemies shall be confounded and sore 
vexed : they shall be turned back, and put to shame 
suddenly. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Turn thee, Lord, and deliver my soul ; for 
in death no man remembereth thee. 



Ant. Lest he devour. 

PsAL. vii. Domine, Deus metis. 

Lord, my God, in thee have I put my trust : 
save me from all them that persecute me, and deliver 
me. 

Lest he devour my soul like a lion, and tear it in 
pieces : while there is none to help. 

Lord, my God, if I have done any such thing : 
or if there be any wickedness in my hands. 

If I have rewarded evil unto him that dealt friend- 
ly with me : yea, I have delivered him that without 
any cause is mine enemy. 




14] an ^f&tt tot fit Btatf. 

Then let mine enemy persecute my soul and take 
me : yea, let him tread my life down upon the earth, 
and lay mine honour in the dust. 

Stand up, Lord, in thy wrath, and lift up thy- 
self, because of the indignation of mine enemies ; 
arise up for me in the judgment that thou hast com- 
manded. 

And so shall the congregation of the people come 
about thee : for their sakes, therefore, lift up thyself 
again. 

The Lord shall judge the people ; give sentence 
with me, Lord : according to my righteousness, 
and according to the innocency that is in me. 

let the wickedness of the ungodly come to an 
end : but guide thou the just. 

For the righteous God : trieth the very hearts and 
reins. 

My help cometh of God ; who preserveth them 
that are true of heart. 

God is a righteous Judge, strong and patient ; and 
God is provoked every day. 

If a man will not turn, he will whet his sword : 
he hath bent his bow, and made it ready. 

He hath prepared for him the instruments of 
death : he ordaineth his arrows against the perse- 
cutors. 

Behold, he travaileth with mischief : he hath con- 
ceived sorrow, and brought forth ungodliness. 

He hath graven and digged up a pit : and is &llen 
himself into the destruction that he made for other. 

For his travail shall come upon his own head ; and 
his wickedness shall fall on his own pate. 

1 will give thanks unto the Lord according to his 
righteousness : and I will praise the Name of the 
Lord most High. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 
And let light perpetual ; shine ui^ou ^em.. 



Sn 0ffice tot tQe BuCtf. [15 



Ant. Lest he devour my soul like a lion, and tear 
it in pieces : while there is none to help. 

y. From the gate of hell, 

I^. Deliver their souls, Lord. 

Our Father. 

ISUenily ihroughottW] 

THE FIRST LESSON. 

Job vii. 16. 

Let me alone, Lord ; for my days are vanity. 
What is man, that thou shouldest magnify him 1 
and that thou shouldest set thine heart upon him 1 
and that thou shouldest visit him every morning, and 
try him every moment ? How long wilt thou not 
depart from me, nor let me alone till I swallow down 
my spittle 1 I have sinned ; what shall I do unto 
thee, thou preserver of men 1 Why hast thou set 
me as a mark against thee, so that I am a burden to 
myself? And why dost thou not pardon my trans- 
gression, and take away mine iniquity 1 for now shall 
I sleep in the dust ; and thou shalt seek me in the 
morning, but I shall not be. 

I^. I know that my Redeemer liveth ; and that 
he shall stand at the latter day upon the earth. And 
in my flesh shall I see God. 

y . Whom I shall see for myself, and mine eyes 
shall behold, and not another. 
And in my flesh shall I see God. 

THE SECOND LESSON. 
Job X. 1. 

My soul is weary of my life ; I will leave my com- 
plaint upon myself ; I will speak in the hitteme^a Qi^ 
mj- soul I wUl asLj unto God, Do not cotA'eaiTi tsv^ s 



16] an ^Mtt for tQe liealr. 

shew me wherefore thou contendest with me. Is it 
good unto thee that thou shouldest oppress, that thou 
shouldest despise the work of thine hands, and shine 
upon the counsel of the wicked 1 Hast thou eyes of 
flesh 1 or seest thou as man seeth 1 Are thy days as 
the days of man 1 Are thy years as man's days, that 
thou enquirest after mine iniquity, and searchest 
after my sin ? Thou knowest that I am not wicked j 
and there is none that can deliver out of thine 
hand. 

R^. Thou that didst raise Lazarus from the grave 
of corruption : do thou grant them, Lord, rest and 
the place of pardon. 

y. Thou who shalt come to judge the quick and 
the dead, and the world by fire. 

Do thou grant them, Lord, rest, and the place of 
pardon. 

THE THIRD LESSON. 
Job X. 8--12. 

Thine hands have made me, and fashioned me to- 
gether round about ; yet thou dost destroy me. Re- 
member, I beseech thee, that thou hast made me as 
the clay ; and wilt thou bring me into dust again 1 
Hast thou not poured me out as milk, and curdled 
me like cheese % Thou hast clothed me with skin 
and flesh, and hast fenced me with bones and sinews. 
Thou hast granted me life and favour, and thy visita- 
tion hath preserved my spirit. 

R^. Lord, when thou comest to judge the earth, 
where shall I hide me from the face of thy wrath % 
For I have greatly sinned in my life. 

^. I fear my deeds, and blush before thee : when 
thou comest to judge, do not condemn me. 
For I hare greatly sinned in my \\fe. 



1 



An ^^fEltt for ti^e IHealr. [17 

ant them, Lord, eternal rest : and let 

)etual shine upon them. 

lave greatly sinned in my life. 

z/^ one Nodum is said, iere/oUow Lauds, Vide injra^ 
O.J 



in ti^e eeconlr ^octutn. 

For Tuesday and Friday, 

le shall feed me. 

PsAL. xxiii. Dominus regit me, 

ard is my shepherd : therefore can I lack 

11 feed me in a green pasture : and lead me 
de the waters of comfort, 
ill convert my soul : and bring me forth in 
of righteousness, for His Name's sake, 
lough I walk through the valley of the sha- 
jath, I will fear no evil : thou art with me ; 
nd thy staff comfort me. 
halt prepare a table before me against them 
ble me : thou hast anointed my head vrith 
ly cup shall be fiilL 

ly loving kindness and mercy shall follow 
B days of my life ; and I will dwell in the 
:he Lord for ever, 

them, Lord : eternal rest. 

t light perpetual : shine upon them. 

le shall feed me in a green pasture. 



) remember not. 

PsAL. zxv. Ad te, Dominey levavu 

thee, Lord, will I lift up my soul ; my 
:ve put my trust in thee ; let lafc hqV.^ 



18] an a^f&ct tot tfle liealr. 

confounded ; neither let mine enemies triumph over 
me. 

For all they that hope in thee shall not be 
ashamed : but such as transgress without a cause 
shall be put to confusion. 

Shew me thy ways, Lord : and teach me thy 
paths. 

Lead me forth in thy truth, and learn me : for 
thou art the God of my salvation ; in thee hath been 
my hope all the day long. 

Call to remembrance, Lord, thy tender mercies : 
and thy loving kindnesses, which have been ever of 
old. 

remember not the sins and oiFences of my youth : 
but according to thy mercy think thou upon me, 
Lord, for thy goodness. 

Gracious and righteous is the Lord : therefore will 
he teach sinners in the way. 

Them that are meek shall he guide in judgment : 
and such as are gentle, them shall he learn his 
way. 

All the paths of the Lord are mercy and truth : 
unto such as keep his covenant, and his testimonies* 

For thy Name's sake, Lord : be merciful unto 
my sin, for it is great. 

What man is he that feareth the Lord : him shall 
he teach in the way that he shall choose. 

His soul shall dwell at ease : and his seed shall in- 
herit the land. 

The secret of the Lord is among them that fear 
him : and he will shew them his covenant. 

Mine eyes are ever looking unto the Lord : for he 
shall pluck my feet out of the net. 

Turn thee unto me, and have mercy upon me : 
for I am desolate, and in misery. 

The sorrows of my heart are enlarged : bring 
thou me out of my troubles. 



^n HM&u tot t^t Btati, [19 

Look upon my adversity and misery : and forgive 
me all my sin. 

Consider mine enemies how many they are : and 
they bear a tyrannous hate against me. 

keep my soul, and deliver me : let me not be 
confounded, for I have put my trust in thee. 

Let perfectness and righteous dealing wait upon 
me : for my hope hath been in thee. 

Deliver Israel, God ; out of all his troubles. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. remember not the sins and offences of my 
youth. 



Ant. I believe verily to see. 

PsAL. xxvii. Dominus illuminatio. 

The Lord is my light, and my salvation ; whom 
then shall I fear : the Lord is the strength of my 
life j of whom, then, shall I be afiraid 1 

When the wicked, even mine enemies, and my foes, 
came upon me to eat up my flesh : they stumbled 
and fell. 

Though an host of men were laid against me, yet 
shall not mine heart be afraid : and though there 
rose up war against me, yet will I put my trust in 
him. 

One thing have I desired of the Lord, which I will 
require : even that I may dwell in the house of the 
Lord all the days of my life, to behold the fair beauty 
of the Lord, and to visit his temple. 

For in the time of trouble he shall hide me in his 
tabernacle : yea, in the secret place of his dwelling 
shall he hide me, and set me up upon a rock of 
stone. 



'20] an ^fRtt iov fit I9ea!r. 

And now shall he lift up mine head : above mine 
enemies roimd about me. 

Therefore will I offer in his dwelling an oblation 
with great gladness : I will sing and speak praises 
unto the Lord. 

Hearken unto my voice, Lord, when I cry unto 
thee : have mercy upon me, and hear me. 

My heart hath talked of thee, Seek ye my face ; 
Thy face, Lord, will I seek. 

hide not thou thy face from me : nor cast thy 
servant away in displeasure. 

Thou hast been my succour : leave me not, neither 
forsake me, God of my salvation. 

When my father and my mother forsake me : the 
Lord taketh me up. 

Teach me thy way, Lord : and lead me in the 
right way because of mine enemies. 

Deliver me not over into the will of mine adversa- 
ries : for there are false witnesses risen up against 
me, and such as speak wrong. 

1 should utterly have fainted : but that I believe 
verily to see the goodness of the Lord in the land of 
the living. 

tarry thou the Lord's leisure : be strong, and he 
shall comfort thine heart ; and put thou thy trust in 
the Lord. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. I believe verily to see the goodness of the 
Lord in the land of the living. 

y. May the Lord set them with the Princes. 
I^. Even with the Princes of his people. 

Our Father. 



2ln Office for t||e Bti(ti. [21 



THE FOURTH LESSON. 
Job xiii. 22. 

r thou me : How many are mine iniqui- 
sins ? make me to know my transgression 
sin. Wherefore hidest thou thy face, and 
ne for thine enemy 1 Wilt thou break a 
m to and fro 1 and wilt thou pursue the dry 
For thou writest bitter things against me, 
est me to possess the iniquities of my youth, 
ttest my feet also in the stocks, and lookest 
' unto all my paths; thou settest a print 
e heels of my feet. And he, as a rotten 
nsumeth, as a garment that is moth-eaten. 

gmember me, God, for my life is wind, 
lot the eyes of man behold me. 

at of the deep have I called unto thee, 

rd, hear my voice. 

3t not the eyes of man behold me. 



THE FIFTH LESSON. 
Job xiv. 1. 

that is bom of a woman is of few days, 
of trouble. He cometh forth like a flower, 
;ut down : he fleeth also as a shadow, and 
th not. And dost thou open thine eyes 
oh an one, and bringest me into judgment 
e 1 Who can bring a clean thing out of an 
I not one. Seeing his days are determined, 
ber of his months are with thee, thou hast 
id his bounds that he cannot pass : turn 
n that he may rest, till he shall accomplish 
reling his day. 

To is me, Lord, for I have greatly sinned 
'fe : What shall I wretcived io'l ^\i\^^T 



\ 



22] flit 0fSce for t)e liealr. 

shall I flee, but to thee, my God 1 Have mercy on 
me when thou comest in the last day. 

y. My soul is exceeding troubled, but thou, 
Lord, succour it. 

Have mercy on me when thou comest in the last 
day. 

THE SIXTH LESSON. 
Job xiv. 13. 

that thou wouldest hide me in th^ grave, that 
thou wouldest keep me secret, until thy wrath be 
past, that thou wouldest appoint me a set time, and 
remember me ! If a man die, shall he live again ? 
All the days of my appointed time will I wait, till 
my change come. Thou shalt call, and I will answer 
thee : thou wilt have a desire to the work of thine 
hands. For now thou numberest my steps : dost 
thou not watch over my sin ? 

I^. Remember not. Lord, mine offences, when 
thou comest to judge the world by fire. 

y. Make my way plain, Lord my God, before 
thy face. 

When thou comest to judge the world by fire. 

y. Grant them, Lord, eternal rest. And let 
light perpetual shine upon them. 

When thou comest to judge the world by fire. 

[ When only one Noctum is said, here follow Lauds, Vide infra, 
page 30.] 

In ti^e tlDttlr ^octunt. 

For Wednesday and Saturday^ 

Ant. Let it be thy pleasure. 

PsAL. xl. Expedans eapectavi, 

1 waited patiently for the Lord : and he inclined 
unto me, and heard my calling. 



2ln HM&tt tor tfe Bealr. [23 

ought me also out of the horrible pit, out of 

and clay : and set my feet upon the rock, 
red my goings. 

e hath put a new song in my mouth : even 
giving unto our God. 

shall see it, and fear ; and shall put their 
the Lord. 

d is the man that hath set his hope in the 
id turned not unto the proud, and to such as 

^vith lies. 

d, my God, great are the wondrous works 
lou hast done, like as be also thy thoughts, 
e to-us-ward : and yet there is no man that 

them unto thee. 

lould declare them, and speak of them : they 

e more than I am able to express. 

ice, and meat-offering, thou wouldest not : 

3 ears hast thou opened. 

offerings, and sacrifice for sin, hast thou not 

: then said I, Lo, I come, 
) volume of the book it is written of me, that 

fulfil thy will, my God : I am content to 
ea, thy law is within my heart. 
3 declared thy righteousness in the great con- 
1 : Lo, I will not refrain my lips, Lord, 

thou knowest. 
3 not hid thy righteousness within my heart : 

hath been of thy truth, and of thy salvation. 
} not kept back thy loving mercy and truth : 
! great congregation. 

Iraw not thou thy mercy from me, Lord : 
oving kindness and thy truth alway preserve 

inumerable troubles are come about me j my 

e taken such hold upon me that I am not 

ook up : yea,/ they are more in number than 

of my head, and my lieart \v.'ai.^ fei^'^Toa. 



24] an ^^fRtt tot tit HBeadr. 



Lord, let it be thy pleasure to deliver me : make 
haste, Lord, to help me. 

Let them be ashamed, and confounded together, 
that seek after my soul to destroy it : let them be 
driven backward, and put to rebuke, that wish me 
evil. 

Let them be desolate and rewarded with shame : 
that say unto me. Fie upon thee. Fie upon thee. 

Let all those that seek thee be jojrfdl and glad in 
thee ; and let such as love thy salvation say alway, 
The Lord be praised. 

As for me, I am poor and needy : but the Lord 
careth for me. 

Thou art my helper and redeemer : make no long 
tarrying, my God. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Lord, let it be thy pleasure to deliver 
me : make haste, Lord, to help me. 



Ant. Heal my soul, Lord. 

PsAL. xli. BecUus qui inteUdgit. 

Blessed is he that considereth the poor and needy : 
the Lord shall deliver him in the time of trouble. 

The Lord preserve him, and keep him alive, that 
he may be blessed upon earth : and deliver thou not 
him into the will of his enemies. 

The Lord comfort him when he lieth sick upon his 
bed : make thou all his bed in his sickness. I 

I said. Lord, be merciful unto me : heal my soul, I 
for I have sinned against thee. 

Mine enemies speak evil of me : When shall he die, 
and his name perish ^ 
And if he come to see me, lie ai^eak^Wi^^m^'^ \ ^ja^ 



9n ^^f&te for ttje 2Dea)r. [25 

Ms heart conceiveth falsehood within himself, and 
when he cometh forth he telleth it. 

All mine enemies whisper together against me : 
even against me do they imagine this evil. 

Let the sentence of guiltiness proceed against him : 
and now that he Ueth, let him rise up no more. 

Yea, even mine own familiar friend whom I trust- 
ed : who did also eat of my bread, hath laid great 
wait for me. 

But be thou merciful unto me, Lord : raise thou 
me up again, and I shall reward them. 

By this I know thou favourest me : that mine 
enemy doth not triumph against me. 

And when I am in my health, thou upholdest me : 
and shalt set me before thy face for ever. 

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel : world without 
end. Amen. 

Grant them, Lord ; eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Heal my soul, Lord, for I have sinned 
against thee. 



Ant. My soul is athirst. 

PsAL. xliL Quemadmodum, 

Like as the hart desireth the water-brooks : so 
longeth my soul after thee, God. 

My soul is athirst for God, yea, even for the living 
God : when shall I come to appear before the pre- 
sence of God 1 

My tears have been my meat day and night : while 
they daily say unto me, Where is now thy God ? 

Now when I think thereupon, I pour out my 
heart by myself : for I went with the multitude, and 
/ brought them forth into the liouse oi Q^cA. 



26] Alt 0f&tt tot tfe Hea]!. 



In the voice of praise and thanksgiying : among 
such as keep holy-day. 

Why art thou so full of heaviness, my soul : and 
why art thou so disquieted within me 1 

Put thy trust in God : for I will yet give him 
thanks for the help of his countenance. 

My God, my soul is vexed within me : therefore 
will I remember thee concerning the land of Jordan, 
and the little hill of Hermon. 

One deep calleth another, because of the noise of 
the water-pipes : all thy waves and storms are gone 
over me. 

The Lord hath granted his loving kindness in the 
day-time : and in the night-season did I sing of him, 
and made my prayer unto the God of my life. 

I will say unto the God of my strength. Why hast 
thou forgotten me : why go I thus heavily while the 
enemy oppresseth me 1 

My bones are smitten asunder as with a sword : 
while mine enemies that trouble me cast me in the 
teeth ; 

Namely, while they say daily unto me : Where is 
now thy God 1 

Why art thou so vexed, my soul : and why art 
thou so disquieted within me ? 

put thy trust in God : for I will yet thank 
him, which is the help of my countenance, and my 
God. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. My soul is athirst for God, yea, even for the 
living God : when shall I come to appear before the 
presence of God ? 

^. deliver not the soul of thy turtle dove unto 
the multitude of the enemies. 



ain <!^fSitt for t^e ]9ealr. [27 

^, And forget not the congregation of thy poor 
for ever. 



Our Father. 



ISilently ihronghoHt,] 



THE SEVENTH LESSON. 
Job xvii. 1 — 3. 1 1 — 15. 

My breath is corrupt, my days are extinct, the 
graves are ready for me. Are there not mockers 
with me 1 and doth not mine eye continue in their 
provocation ? Lay down now, put me in a surety 
with theej who is he that will strike hands with 
me ? My days are past, my purposes are broken off, 
even the thoughts of my heart. They change the 
night into day : the light is short, because of dark- 
ness. If I wait, the grave is mine house : I have 
made my bed in the darkness. I have said to cor- 
ruption, Thou art my father : to the worm, Thou art 
my mother and my sister. And where is now my 
hope ? As for my hope, who shall see it 1 

I^. While I sin daily against thee, and repent not, 
the fear of death disturbs me. Since in the grave 
there is no deliverance, have mercy on me, God, 
and save me. 

y. Save me, God, for thy Name's sake, and de- 
liver me in thy strength. 

For in the grave there is no deliverance, have 
mercy on me, God, and save me. 

THE EIGHTH LESSON. 
Job xix. 20. 

My bone cleaveth to my skin and to my flesh, and 
I am escaped with the skin of my teeth. Have pity 
upon me, have pity upon me, ye my friends ; for 
the hand of God hath touched me. 'SPJla.^ ^o -^^ ^^\'sfc- 



28] Sit H^f&tt tot t^t ^U(tl, 



L 



cute me as God, and are not satisfied with my flesh % 
Oh that my words were now written ! Oh that they 
were printed in a book ! That they were graven 
with an iron pen and lead, in the rock for ever ! For 
I know that my Redeemer liveth, and that he shall 
stand at the latter day upon the earth ; and though 
after my skin worms destroy this body, yet in my 
flesh shall I see God : whom I shall see for myselJ^ 
and mine eyes shall behold, and not another : though 
my reins be consumed within me. 

K^. Lord, deal not with me according to my 
deeds : I have nothing that is good in thy sight : 
therefore, I beseech thy majesty, that thou, God, 
wouldest do away mine offences. 

y . Wash me throughly from mine iniquity, and 
cleanse me from my sin. 

That thou, God, wouldst do away mine offences. 

THE NINTH LESSON. 
Job X. 18. 

Wherefore, then, hast thou brought me forth out 
of the womb % Oh that I had given up the ghost, 
and no eye had seen me ! I should have been as 
though I had not been ; I should have been carried 
from the womb to the grave. Are not my days few % 
cease then, and let me alone, that I may take comfort 
a little, before I go whence I shall not return, even 
to the land of darkness, and the shadow of death \ a 
land of darkness as darkness itself ; and of the sha- 
dow of death without any order, and where the light 
is as darkness. 

K^. Deliver me, Lord, from the ways of the pit, 

thou who didst break the gates of brass : and de- 

scendedst into hell, and gavest them light, that they 

might see thee : who were in t\ie "i^^Mia oi ^^x^^ksas.. 



an HMtt tor tQe IBealr. [29 

y. Crying and saying : Thou hast come, Our Re- 
deemer. 

Who were in the pains of darkness. 

"y . Grant them, Lord, eternal rest : and let 
light perpetual shine upon them. 

Who were in the pains of darkness. 

[Tke/oUoimng "Bjl, is proper to be used only on AU Sotds* Day^ 
and whenever the Nine Lessons of the QffvoefoT the Departed 
are read."] 

I^. Deliver me, Lord, from eternal death, in 
that tremendous day : when the heavens and the 
earth shall be moved : and thou comest to judge the 
world by fire. 

'y. I become trembling, and fear when the shaking 
is at hand, and the wrath to come. 

When the heavens and the earth shall be moved. 

y . That day, a day of wrath, a day of trouble and 
distress, a great day, and exceeding bitter. 
When thou comest to judge the world by fire. 

y. Grant them, Lord, eternal rest : and let 
light perpetual shine upon them. 

Deliver me, Lord, from eternal death, in that 
tremendous day, when the heavens and the earth 
shall be moved : and thou comest to judge the world 
by fire. 



30] Sn ®f&tt for t||e Beatf, 



AT LAUDS 

Begin immediately /rom the Ajdiphon, 

Ant. That the bones which thou hast broken. 

PsAL. li. Miserere tneiy Deus. 

Have mercy upon me, God, after thy great good- 
ness : according to the multitude of thy mercies do 
away mine offences. 

Wash me throughly from my wickedness : and 
cleanse me from my sin. 

For I acknowledge my faults : and my sin is ever 
before me. 

Against thee only have I sinned, and done this 
evil in thy sight : that thou mightest be justified in 
thy saying, and clear when thou art judged. 

Behold, I was shapen in wickedness : and in sin 
hath my mother conceived me. 

But, lo, thou requirest truth in the inward parts ; 
and shalt make me to understand wisdom secretly. 

Thou shalt purge me with hyssop, and I shall be 
clean : thou shalt wash me, and I shall be whiter 
than snow. 

Thou shalt make me hear of joy and gladness : 
that the bones which thou hast broken may rejoice. 

Turn thy face from my sins : and put out all my 
misdeeds. 

Make me a clean heart, God : and renew a right 
spirit within me. 

Cast me not away from thy presence : and take 
not thy Holy Spirit from me. 

give me the comfort of thy help again : and 
stablish me with thy free Spirit. 

Then shall I teach thy ways unto the wicked : 
and sinners shall be converted unto t\i^^. 



Un (&f&tt for t||e liealr. [3i 



/ 



Deliver me from blood guiltiness, God, thou that 
art the God of my health : and my tongue shall aing 
of thy righteousness. 

Thou shalt open my lips, Lord : and my mouth 
shall shew thy praise. 

For thou desirest no sacrifice, else would I give it 
thee : but thou delightest not in burnt offerings. 

The sacrifice of God is a troubled spirit : a broken 
and contrite heart, God, shalt thou not despise. 

be favourable and gracious unto Sion : build 
thou the walls of Jerusalem. 

Then shalt thou be pleased with the sacrifice of 
righteousness, with the burnt offerings and obla- 
tions : then shall they offer young bullocks upon 
thine altar. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

That the bones which thou hast broken may re- 
joice. 

Ant. Thou that hearest the prayer. 

PsAL. Ixv. Te decet hymnus. 

Thou, God, art praised in Sion : and unto thee 
shall the vow be performed in Jerusalem. 

Thou that hearest the prayer : unto thee shall all 
flesh come. 

My misdeeds prevail against me : be thou mer- 
ciful unto our sins. 

Blessed is the man whom thou choosest, and re- 
ceivest unto thee ; he shall dwell in thy court, and 
shall be satisfied with the pleasures of thy house, 
even of thy holy temple. 

Thou shalt shew us wonderful things in thy righte- 
du$nes8, God of our salvation *. \koM \)>aaX. ^sx*v» '^'^ 




32] 9n 0fRtt tor t)e Healr. 



hope of all the ends of the earth, and of them that 
remain in the broad sea. 

Who in his strength setteth fest the mountains : 
and is girded about with power. 

Who stilleth the raging of the sea : and the noise 
of his waves, and the madness of the people. 

They also that dwell in the uttermost parts of the 
earth shall be afraid at thy tokens : thou that mak^st 
the outgoings of the morning and evening to praise 
thee. 

Thou visitest the earth, and blessest it : thou 
makest it very plenteous. 

The river of God is Ml of water : thou preparest 
their corn, for so thou providest for the earth. 

Thou waterest her fiirrows, thou sendest rain into 
the little valleys thereof : thou makest it soft with 
the drops of rain, and blessest the increase of it. 

Thou crownest the year with thy goodness : and 
thy clouds drop fatness. 

They shall drop upon the dwellings of the wilder- 
ness : and the little hills shall rejoice on every side. 

The folds shall be fall of sheep : the valleys also 
shall stand so thick with corn that they shall laugh 
and sing. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual ; shine upon them. 

Ant. Thou that hearest the prayer: unto thee 
shall all flesh come. 



Ant. Thy right hand. 

PsAL. bdii. Deus, Deus meus, 

God, thou art my God : early will I seek thee. 

My soul thirsteth for thee, my flesh also longeth 
after thee : in a barren and dry land, where no 
water is* 



I 



An i&f&ct fnx X%t ISealr. [33 

Thus have I looked for thee in holiness : that I 
might hehold thy power and glory. 

For thy loving-kindness is hetter than the life it- 
self : my lips shall praise thee. 

As long as I live will I magnify thee on this man- 
ner : and lift up my hands in thy Name. 

My soul shall be satisfied even as it were with mar- 
row and fatness : when my mouth praiseth thee with 
joyM lips. 

Have I not remembered thee in my bed : and 
thought upon thee when I was waking ? 

Because thou hast been my helper : therefore, 
under the shadow of thy wings will I rejoice. 

My soul hangeth upon thee : thy right hand hath 
upholden me. 

These also that seek the hurt of my soul : they 
shall go under the earth. 

Let them fall upon the edge of the sword : that 
they may be a portion for foxes. 

But the King shall rejoice in God ; all they also 
that swear by him shall be commended ; for the 
mouth of them that speak lies shall be stopped. 

PsAL. Ixrii. Dem misereatur. 

God be merciful unto us and bless us : and shew 
us the light of his countenance, and be merciful unto 
us: 

That thy way may be known upon earth : thy 
saving health among all nations. 

Let the people praise thee, God : yea, let all the 
people praise thee. 

let the nations rejoice and be glad ; for thou 
shalt judge the folk righteously, and govern the na- 
tions upon earth. 

Let the people praise thee, God : let all the peo- 
ple praise tbee. 



34] Sit iMitt tor t^e Btatt, 



Then shall the earth bring forth her increase.* 
and God, even our own God, shall give us his 
blessing. 

God shall bless us ; and all the ends of the world 
shall fear him. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Thy right hand hath upholden me.. 



Ant. From the gate of hell. 

CafUicum Ezekia. Isaiah xxxviii. 10 — ^20. 

I said in the cutting off of my days, I shall go to 
the gates of the grave : I am deprived of the residue 
of my years. 

I said, I shall not see the Lord, even the Lord in 
the land of the living : I shall behold man no more 
with the inhabitants of the world. 

Mine age is departed, and is removed from me as a 
shepherd's tent; I have cut off like a weaver my 
life : he will cut me off with pining sickness ; from 
day even to night wilt thou make an end of me. 

I reckoned till morning, that, as a lion, so will he 
break all my bones : from day even to night wilt 
thou make an end of me. 

Like a crane or a swallow, so did I chatter ; I did 
mourn as a dove ; mine eyes fail with looking up- 
ward : Lord, I am oppressed ; undertake for me. 

What shall I say? He hath both spoken unto 
me, and himself hath done it : I shall go softly all 
my years, in the bitterness of my soul. 

Lord, by these things men live, and in all these 
things is the life of my spirit : so wilt thou recover 
me, and make me to liv^. 
-Behold for peace I YiaA great Vitteni^'a^ \\svi\. ^^-^ 



flu ilMt$ tot t||e Slealr. [35 

hast in love to my soul delivered it from the pit of 
corruption; for thou hast cast all my sins behind 
thy l^k. 

For the grave cannot praise thee, death cannot 
celebrate thee : they that go down into the pit 
cannot hope for thy truth. 

The living, the living, he shall praise thee as I do 
this day : the father to the children shall make 
known thy trutL 

The Lord was ready to save me : therefore we will 
sing my songs to the stringed instruments all the 
days of our life in the house of the Lord. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. From the gate of hell deliver my soul, 
Lord. 



Ant. Let every thing that hath breath. 

PsAL. czlviiL Lattdaie Dominum, 

praise the Lord of Heaven : praise him in the 
height. 

Praise him, all ye angels of his : praise him, all 
his host. 

Praise him, sun and moon : praise him, all ye stars 
and light. 

Praise him, all ye heavens : and ye waters that are 
above the heavens. 

Let them praise the Name of the Lord : for he 
spake the word, and they were made; he com- 
manded, and they were created. 

He hath made them fast for ever and ever : he 
hath given them a law which shall not be broken. 

Praise the Lord upon earth : ye dragons and all 
deeps; 



\ 



36] an a^f&tt tor tifte Ideolr. 



Fire and hail, snow and vapours : wind and 
fulfilling his word ; 

Mountains and all hills : fruitful trees : 
cedars; 

Beasts and all cattle : worms and feathered 

Kings of the earth, and all people ; prin( 
all judges of the world ; 

Young men and maidens, old men and cl 
praise the Name of the Lord : for his Name 
excellent, and his praise above heaven and eai 

He shall exalt the horn of his people ; 
saints shall praise him : even the children of 
even the people that serveth him. 

PsAL. cxlix. Cantate Domino. 

sing unto the Lord a new song : let the 
gation of saints praise him. 

Let Israel rejoice in him that made him : i 
the children of Sion be joyful in their King. 

Let them praise his Name in the dance : k 
sing praises unto him with tabret and harp. 

For the Lord hath pleasure in his peoph 
helpeth the meek-hearted. 

Let the saints be joyful with glory : le 
rejoice in their beds. 

Let the praises of God be in their mouth 
two-edged sword in their hands ; 

To be avenged of the heathen : and to rebi 
people ; 

To bind their kings in chains : and their 
with links of iron. 

That they may be avenged of them, a 
written : such honour have all his saints. 

PsAL. cL Laudate Dominum, 

/O praise God in his holiness : praise him 
Grmajnent of his power. 



an a^f&ct for tifte JBeats. [37 

Praise him in his noble acts : praise him according 
to his excellent greatness. 

Praise him in the sound of the trumpet : praise 
him upon the lute and harp. 

Praise him in the cymbals and dances : praise 
Um upon the strings and pipe. 

Praise him upon the weU-tuned cymbals : praise 
him upon the loud cymbals. 

Let every thing that hath breath : praise the Lord. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. Let every thing that hath breath praise the 
Lord. 

y . I heard a voice from heaven, saying unto me. 
I^ Blessed are the dead, which die in the Lord. 



/ 



Ant. I am. 

LuKB i. 68. Benedictus. 

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel : for he hath 
visited and redeemed his people : 

And hath raised up a mighty salvation for us : in 
the house of his servant David ; 

As he spake by the mouth of his holy Prophets : 
which have been since the world began ; 

That we should be saved from our enemies : and 
from the hands of all that hate us ; 

To perform the mercy promised to our fore- 
fathers : and to remember his holy Covenant ; 

To perform the oath which he sware to our fore- 
father Abraham : that he would give us ; 

That we being delivered out of the hand of our 
enemies : might serve him without fear ; 

In holiness and righteousness before him : all the 
days of our life. 



40] Vtaserfi tor t1|e Meats. 



airlrtttonal Vtasers tot VattitnUt H^ttaaiom. 

TRANSLATED FROM THE ANCIENT ENGLISH OFFICE. 



[" The Greater Prayer^^ is used Morning and Evening token 
the Corpse is present.] 

God, whose nature and property is ever to have 
mercy and to forgive ; we humbly pray thee for 
the soul of thy servant i\r., whom thou hast to-day 
called out of this world : Deliver him not into the 
hands of his enemy, nor forget him for ever; but 
give thy holy Angels charge to receive him, and to 
bring him into the land of the living : and foras- 
much as he put his trust and confidence in thee, be 
pleased to count him worthy of the fellowship of 
thy saints. Through our Lord Jesus Christ, thy 
Son, who liveth and reigneth with thee in the unity 
of the Holy Ghost, one God, world without end. 

[On the anniversary in the Morning, and on the monthly rdum 
of the day of the death or interment in the Evening, ^ THX 
Lesser Prayer" is used.] 

God, whose nature and property is ever to have 
mercy and to forgive ; be gracious to the soul of thy 
servant i\r., and put away all his sins ; that being 
released from the bonds of death he may be counted 
worthy to pass into life. Through our Lord. 

On the anniversary in the Evening. [Same as above, page 8>] 

God, the Lord of all mercy, grant unto the soul 
of thy servant i\^., the day of whose interment we do 
now this year commemorate, the place of refresh- 
ment, the blessedness of rest, and the brightness of 
thy divine light. Through. 

Note. — The Ancient English Office " In Vigiliis Mortuorum," 

differs in no respect of importance from that translated above. 

The variations lie almost entirely in the Y and I\?, which are oc- 

casionally made to change places, &c.; and in the following 

prayers added to or substituted for those aiboNe. 



Erasers for tifte ISealr. [41 

>» (he monthly return of the day in the Morning, 

^hty and everlasting God, who art neyer 
I without hope of mercy, be gracious to the 
thy servant ^. ; that, forasmuch as he de- 
)ut of this life in the confession of thy 
ime, he may be numbered with thy saints. 

For Bishops or Priests departed, [evening.] 

I, who amongst Apostolic Priests hast caused 
ints to be thought worthy of the dignity of 
[or Priests] : grant, we beseech thee, that 
' enjoy their everlasting fellowship in heaven, 
fice for a little while they partook on earth. 

For the same, [morning.] 

I, whose mercy is infinite, accept our prayers 
souls of thy servants the Bishops [and 
v.], and grant them the abode of light and 
le fellowship of thy saints. Through. 

neral Prayer /or all Departed Souls, [evening.] 

I, the Creator and Redeemer of all them that 
^rant to the souls of aU thy faithful servants 
dmaids departed the remission of all their 
lat through pious supplications they may 
he pardon they have always desired. Who 
id reignest with the Father and the Holy 
rod, for ever and ever. Amen. 

The same, [morning.] 

•d, we thy humble servants pray thee for 
is of all the Faithful departed ; that thou 
) release them from all their sins, and make 
.rtakers of thy redemption. Who livest and 
with the Father and the Holy Ghost, God, 
and ever. Amen. 



\ 



42] 9taser0 for tifte 29ealr. 



/ 



THE GRADUAL PSALMS* 



Are proper to be used on the Wednesday of every week in Len^ 
unless superseded by one of the greater Festivals. InpubUc they are 
said before Matins ; in private as opportunity allows, 

TTie first five Psalms are said uiUhout the Doacology^ " Ghry he to 
the Father^ ^c. ;" but at the end of the last, ** Grant them, Lordf 
eternal rest, ^c" is repeated. 

There is no Jntiphon. 



PsAL. cxx. Ad Dominum, 

When I was in trouble I called upon the Lord : 
and he heard me. 

Deliver my soul, Lord, from lying lips : and 
from a deceitful tongue. 

What reward shall be given or done unto thee, 
thou false tongue : even mighty and sharp arrows, 
with hot burning coals. 

Wo is me, that I am constrained to dwell with 
Mesech : and to have my habitation among the tents 
of Kedar. 

My soul hath long dwelt among them : that are 
enemies unto peace. 

I labour for peace, but when I speak unto them 
thereof : they make them ready to battle. 

PsAL. cxxi. Levavi octdos. 

I will lift up mine eyes unto the hills : from 
whence cometh my help. 

My help cometh even from the Lord : who hath 
made heaven and earth. 

* For remarks on the GradTMil PaaJ^*, see'^teJaRfc, 



I 






L 



^%t OErralrual psalms. [43 

He will not suffer thy foot to be moved : and lie 
that keepeth thee will not sleep. 

Behold he that keepeth Israel : shall neither slum- 
ber nor sleep. 

The Lord himself is thy keeper : the Lord is thy 
defence upon thy right hand ; 

So that the sun shall not bum thee by day : neither 
the moon by night. 

The Lord shall preserve thee from all evil : yea, 
it is even he that shall keep thy soul. * 

The Lord shall preserve thy going out and thy 
coming in : from this time forth for evermore. 

PsAL. cxxiL LcBtaJtus sum. 

I was glad when they said unto me : We will go 
into the house of the Lord. 

Our feet shall stand in thy gates ; Jerusalem. 

Jerusalem is built as a city : that is at unity in 
itself. 

For thither the tribes go up, even the tribes of the 
Lord : to testify unto Israel, to give thanks unto the 
Name of the Lord. 

For there is the seat of judgment : even the seat 
of the house of David. 

pray for the peace of Jerusalem : they shall 
prosper that love thee. 

Peace be within thy walls : and plenteousness 
within thy palaces. 

For my brethren and companions' sakes : I will 
wish thee prosperity. 

Yea, because of the house of the Lord our God : I 
will seek to do thee good. 

PsAL. cxxiii. Adte levavi octdos meos. 

Unto thee lift I up mine eyes : thou that 
dweUest in the heavens. 



44] Erasers tot tie Idealr. 

Behold, even as the eyes of servants look unto the 
hand of their masters, and as the eyes of a maiden 
unto the hand of her mistress : even so our eyes 
wait upon the Lord our God, until he have mercy 
upon us. 

Have mercy upon us, Lord, have mercy upoa 
us : for we are utterly despised. 

Our soul is filled with the scornful reproof of the 
wealthy : and with the despitefulnes of the proud. 



PsAL. cxxiv. Nisi quia Domintts. 

If the Lord himself had not been on our side, now 
may Israel say : if the Lord himself had not been on 
our side, when men rose up against us ; 

They had swallowed us up quick : when they 
were so wrathfuUy displeased at us. 

Yea, the waters had drowned us : and the stream 
had gone over our soul. 

The deep waters of the proud : had gone even over 
our soul. 

But praised be the Lord : who hath not given us 
over for a prey unto their teeth. 

Our soul is escaped even as a bird out of the 
snare of the fowler : the snare is broken, and we are 
delivered. 

Our help standeth in the Name of the Lord : who 
hath made heaven and earth. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

[Then is said kneeling.} 

Our Father. 



y'. And lead us not into temptation, 
i^. But deliver us from evil. 



f 



C^e <$ralrual V^alms. [45 

y. From the gate of hell, 

I^. Deliver their souls, Lord. 

y. May they rest in peace. 
I^ Amen. 

Lord, hear my prayer. 
^. And let my crying come unto thee. 

£. The Lord be with you. 
I^ And with thy spirit. 

Let us pray. 

Absolve, Lord, we beseech thee, the souls of 
thy servants, iV., and handmaids, i^., and of all the 
Faithful Departed from the chain of their sins : that 
being raised in the glory of the resurrection, they may 
be refreshed amongst thy Saints and Elect. Through 
Christ our Lord. 

1^. Amen. 

[^Then are said the other Gradual Psalms which foUow^ and at 
the end of each the Doocology " Glory be to the Father y\ 

PsAL. cxxy. Qui confidunt. 

They that put their trust in the Lord shall be 
even as the mount Sion : which may not be removed, 
but standeth fast for ever. 

The hills stand about Jerusalem : even so standeth 
the Lord round about his people, from this time forth 
for evermore. 

For the rod of the ungodly cometh not into the 
lot of the righteous : lest the righteous put their 
hand unto wickedness. 

Do well, Lord : unto those that are good and 
true of heart. 

As for such as turn back unto their own wicked- 
ness : the Lord shall lead them forth with the evil- 
I doers; hut peace shall be upon lsta&\. 



46] Vrauttfi for t|e JBtatt. 



PsAL. cxxvi In convertendo. 

When the Lord turned again the captivity of 
Sion : then were we like unto them that dream. 

Then was our mouth filled with laughter : Jwid 
our tongue with joy. 

Then said they among the heathen : the Lord 
hath done great things for them. 

Yea, the Lord hath done great things for us al- 
ready : whereof we rejoice. 

Turn our captivity, Lord : as the rivers in th& 
south. 

They that sow in tears : shall reap in joy. 

He that now goeth on his way weeping, and bear — 
eth forth good seed : shall doubtless come again wittm. 
joy, and bring his sheaves with him. 

PsAL. cxxviL Nisi Domintu. 

Except the Lord build the house : their labour is 
but lost that build it. 

Except the Lord keep the city : the watchmaxi 
waketh but in vain. 

It is but lost labour that ye haste to rise up early, 
and so late take rest, and eat the bread of careful- 
ness : for so he giveth his beloved sleep. 

Lo, children and the fruit of the womb : are an 
heritage and gift that cometh of the Lord. 

Like as the arrows in the hand of the giant : even 
so are the young children. 

Happy is the man that hath his quiver full of 
them : they shall not be ashamed when they speak 
with their enemies in the gate. 



PsAL. cxxviii. Beaii omnes. 



Blessed are all they that feax the Lord : and walk 
in his ways. 



\ 



Clfte Orolrual Vfialms. [47 

For thou shalt eat the labours of thine hands : 
well is thee, and happy shalt thou be. 

Thy wife shall be as the finiitful vine : upon the 
walls of thine house. 

Thy children like the olive branches : round about 
thy table. 

Lo, thus shall the man be blessed : that feareth 
the Lord. 

The Lord from out of Sion shall so bless thee ; 
that thou shalt see Jerusalem in prosperity all thy 
life long. 

Yea, that thou shalt see thy children's children : 
and peace upon Israel. 

PsAL. cxxiz. S(Bpe expttgnaveruni. 

Many a time have they fought against me from 
my youth up : may Israel now say. 

Yea, many a time have they vexed me from my 
youth up : but they have not prevailed against me. 

The plowers plowed upon my back : and made 
long furrows. 

But the righteous Lord : hath hewn the snares of 
the ungodly in pieces. 

Let them be confounded and turned backward : as 
many as have evil will at Sion. 

Let them be even as the grass growing upon the 
housetops : which withereth afore it be plucked up ; 

Whereof the mower fiUeth not his hand : neither 
he that bindeth up the sheaves his bosom. 

So that they who go by say not so much as, The 
Lord prosper you : we wish you good luck in the 
Name of the Lord. 

{Then w said kneelinff.] 

Lord, have mercy upon us. 
Christ, have mercy upon us. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. 



X 



48] Vta^ers tor ti^e IDealr. 



Our Father. 

y . And lead us not into temptation, 
R^. But deliver us from eviL 

}[ , Remember thy congregation. 
R^. Which thou hast possessed from the begin- 
ning. 

y , Lord, hear my prayer. 

R^. And let my cry come unto thee. 

y . The Lord be with you. 
R^. And with thy spirit. 

Let us pray. 

God, whose nature and property is ever to have 
mercy and to forgive, receive our humble petitions ^ 
and grant that we and all thy servants, who are 
bound with the chain of our sins, may by the piti- 
fulness of thy great mercy be loosed ; for the honour 
of Jesus Christ, our Mediator and Advocate. 

R^. Amen. 

\Then are said the other Gradual Psodms which follow^ and at 
the end of each the Doaedogi/ " Glory betoihe FaiherJ" 

PsAL. cxxx. Deprofundis, 

Out of the deep have I called unto thee, Lord : 
Lord, hear my voice. 

let thine ears consider well : the voice of my 
complaint. 

If thou. Lord, wilt be extreme to mark what is 
done amiss : Lord, who may abide it 1 

For there is mercy with thee : therefore shalt thou 
be feared. 
/ look for the Lord ; my soul dolliNi^t iot him : 
in his word is mj trust. 



' C|e Oralmal VMlms. [49 

My soul fleeth unto the Lord : before the morning 
Watch, I say, before the morning watch. 

Israel, trust in the Lord, for with the Lord there 
is mercy : and with him is plenteous redemption. 

And he shall redeem Israel : from all his sins. 

PsAL. czzxi. Domine^ non est 

Lord, I am not high-minded : I hare no proud 
looks. 

1 do not exercise myself in great matters : which 
are too high for me. 

But I refrain my soul, and keep it low, like as a 
child that is weaned from his mother : yea, my soul 
is even as a weaned child. 

Israel, trust in the Lord : from this time forth 
for evermore. 

PsAL. cxxxii. Memento, Domine. 

Lord, remember David : and all his trouble j 
How he sware unto the Lord : and vowed a vow 
unto the Almighty God of Jacob ; 

1 will not come within the tabernacle of mine 
house : nor climb up into my bed ; 

I will not suffer mine eyes to sleep, nor mine eye- 
lids to slumber : neither the temples of my head to 
take any rest j 

Until I find out a place for the temple of the 
Lord : an habitation for the mighty God of Jacob. 

Lo, we heard of the same at Ephrata : and found 
it in the wood. 

We will go into his tabernacle : and fall low on 
our knees before his footstool. 

Arise, Lord, into thy resting-place : thou, and 
the ark of thy strength. 

Let thy priests be clothed with righteousness : and 
let thy saints sing with joyfulnesa. 



50] 9ta^nii tot tifte HBtats, 

For thy servant David's sake : turn not away the 
presence of thine Anointed. 

The Lord hath made a faithful oath unto David ; 
and he shall not shrink from it. 

Of the fruit of thy body : shall I set upon thy 
seat. 

If thy children will keep my covenant, and m^r 
testimonies that I shall learn them : their children 
also shall sit upon thy seat for evermore. 

For the Lord hath chosen Sion to be an habitation 
for himself : he hath longed for her. 

This shall be my rest for ever : here will I dwell, 
for I have a delight therein. 

I will bless her victuals with increase : and will 
satisfy her poor with bread. 

I will deck her priests with health ; and her saints 
shall rejoice and sing. 

There shall I make the horn of David to flourish . 
I have ordained a lantern for mine Anointed. 

As for his enemies I shall clothe them with shame : 
but upon himself shall his crown flourish. 

PsAL. cxxxiii. Ecce, quam bonum! 

Behold, how good and joyful a thing it is ; bre- 
thren, to dwell together in unity ! 

It is like the precious ointment upon the head, 
that ran down unto the beard : even unto Aaron's 
beard, and went down to the skirts of his clothing. 

Like as the dew of Hermon ; which fell upon the 
hill of Sion. 

For there the Lord promised his blessing ; and 
life for evermore. 

PsAL. cxxxiv. Ecce nunc. 

Behold now, praise the Lord : all ye servants of 
the Lord ; 



^^^^^^^ CJe 4!$talrual Vsalms. [51 

Ye that by night stand in the house of the Lord : 
even in the courts of the house of our God. 

Lift up your hands in the sanctuary : and praise 
the Lord. 

The Lord that made heayen and earth : give thee 
blessing out of Sion. 

[Then is mid kneeling,] 

Lord, have mercy upon us. 
Christ, have mercy upon us. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. 

Our Father. 

y. And lead us not into temptation. 
I^. But deliver us from evil. 

y . Save thy servants. 

I^. My God which trust in thee. 

y. Lord, hear my prayer. 

I^. And let my cry come unto thee. 

The Lord be with you. 
And with thy spirit. 

Let us pray. 

Stretch forth, Lord, to thy servants and hand- 
maids the right hand of thy heavenly aid ; that they 
may seek thee with their whole heart ; and that those 
things which they worthily ask they may be counted 
meet to obtain. Through Christ our Lord. 
- I^. Amen, 



\ 



52] 9raser0 for t1^ H^eai). 



THE SEVEN PENITENTIAL PSAL] 



are proper to be said kneding^ espedaUy on all ordinary 1 
Lent^ together with the following Litanies, 



Antiphon. Bemember not. 

against anger. 

PsAL. vi. Domine, ne in furore. 

Lord, rebuke me not in thine indig] 
neither chasten me in thy displeasure. 

Have mercy upon me, Lord, for I am w 
Lord, heal me, for my bones are vexed. 

My soul also is sore troubled : but, Lo 
long wilt thou punish me ? 

Turn thee, Lord, and deliver my soul ; 
me for thy mercy's sake. 

For in death no man remembereth thee : a 
will give thee thanks in the pit 1 

1 am weary of my groaning : every night 
my bed : and water my couch with my tears. 

My beauty is gone for very trouble : ar 
away because of all mine enemies. 

Away from me all ye that work vanity : 
Lord hath heard the voice of my weeping. 

Note. The intention of the several Penitential Psal 
pressed at the beginning of each. In saying them, ho\ 
ideas may be thus changed, or the same kept through 
they may be said for ourselves or for others (of Li 

Stephen Harding, p. 148) as occaaVou le^^vikft^. Fot i 

marks see Preface. 



C9e 9enttenttal Vsalmfi. [53 



The Lord hath heard my petition : the Lord will 
receive my prayer. 

All mine enemies shall be confounded, and sore 
vexed : they shall be turned back and put to shame 
suddenly. 

Glory be to the Father. 



^qaimt 9rt^e. 

PsAL. xxxii. Beati, quorum. 

Blessed is he whose unrighteousness is forgiven : 
and whose sin is covered. 

Blessed is the man unto whom the Lord imputeth 
no sin ; and in whose spirit there is no guile. 

For while I held my tongue : my bones consumed 
away through my daily complaining. 

For thy hand is heavy upon me day and night ; 
and my moisture is like the drought in summer. 

I will acknowledge my sin unto thee : and mine 
unrighteousness have I not hid. 

I said, I will confess my sins unto the Lord ; and 
so thou forgavest the wickedness of my sin. 

For this shall every one^that is godly make his 
prayer unto thee, in a time when thou mayest be 
found ; but in the great water-floods they shall not 
come nigh him. 

Thou art a place to hide me in, thou shalt preserve 
me from trouble : thou shalt compass me about with 
songs of deliverance. 

I will inform thee, and teach thee in the way 
wherein thou shalt go : and I will guide thee with 
mine eye. 

Be ye not like to horse and mule, which have no 
understanding : whose mouths must be held with bit 
and bridle, lest they fall upon thee. 

Great plagues remain for tli© xuig^iSV'^ \W\»^\\ss^'?i V. 



A 



54] Vrasem for tl^e 19ealr. 



putteth his trust in the Lord, mercy embraceth him 
on every side. 

Be glad, ye righteous, and rejoice in the Lord : 
and be joyful, all ye that are true of heart. 

Glory be to the Father. 

against (Qrluttons. 

PsAL. xzxyiii. Domine^ ne in furore. 

Put me not to rebuke, Lord, in thine anger : 
neither chasten me in thy heavy displeasure. 

For thine arrows stick fast in me : and thy hand 
presseth me sore. 

There is no health in my flesh, because of thy dis- 
pleasure ; neither is there any rest in my bones, by 
reason of my sin. 

For my wickednesses are gone over my head ; and 
are like a sore burden, too heavy for me to bear. 

My wounds stink, and are corrupt : through my 
foolishness. 

I am brought into so great trouble and misery : 
that I go mourning all the day long. 

For my loins are filled with a sore disease : and 
there is no whole part in my body. 

I am feeble, and sore smitten ; I have roared for 
the very disquietness of my heart. 

Lord, thou knowest all my desire ; and my groan- 
ing is not hid &om thee. 

My heart panteth, my strength hath failed me ; 
and the sight of mine eyes is gone from me. 

My lovers and my neighbours did stand looking 
upon my trouble ; and my kinsmen stood afar oft 

They also that sought after my life laid snares for 
me : and they that went about to do me evil talked 
/ of wiciedness, and imagined deofcit ill the day long. 
/ As for me, I was like a deai maja., ^ixAV^ax^Xkafv,' 



/ 



(Tl^e 9enttenttal Vsalms. [55 

and as one that is dumb^ who doth not open his 
mouth. 

I became even as a man that heareth not : and in 
whose mouth are no reproofs. 

For in thee, Lord, have I put my trust : thou 
shalt answer for me, Lord my God. 

I have required that they, even mine enemies, 
should not triumph over me : for when my foot slip- 
ped, they rejoiced greatly against me. 

And I, truly, am set in the plague : and my heavi- 
ness is ever in my sight. 

For I will confess my wickedness : and be sorry 
for my sin. 

But mine enemies live, and are mighty : and they 
that hate me wrongfully are many in number. 

They also that reward evil for good are against 
me : because I follow the thing that good is. 

Forsake me not, Lord my God : be not thou far 
from me. 

Haste thee to help me : Lord God of my salva- 
tion. 

Glory be to the Father. 



Against Euiuts. 

■ 

PsAL. li. Miserere met, Deus. 

Have mercy upon me, God, after thy great good- 
ness : according to the multitude of thy mercies do 
away mine offences. 

Wash me throughly from my wickedness ; and 
cleanse me from my sin. 

For I acknowledge my faults : and my sin is ever 
before me. 

Against thee only have I sinned, and done this evil 
in thy sight : that thou mightest be justified in thy 
saying, and clear when thou axt '^ud^g^^. 



^6] 9taser0 fot tfle IBealr. 



Behold, I was shapen in wickedness : and in sin 
hath my mother conceived me. 

But lo, thou requirest truth in the inward parts ; 
and shalt make me to understand wisdom secretly. 

Thou shalt purge me with hyssop, and I shall be 
clean : thou shalt wash me, and I shall be whiter 
than snow. 

Thou shalt make me hear of joy and gladness : 
that the bones which thou hast broken may rejoice. 

Turn thy face from my sins : and put out all my 
misdeeds. 

Make me a clean heart, God ; and renew a right 
spirit within me. 

Cast me not away from thy presence ; and take 
not thy holy spirit from me. 

give me the comfort of thy help again : and 
stablish me with thy free Spirit. 

Then shall I teach thy ways unto the wicked : and 
sinners shall be converted unto thee. 

Deliver me from blood-guiltiness, God, thou that 
art the God of my health ; and my tongue shall sing 
of thy righteousness. 

Thou shalt open my lips, Lord : and my mouth 
shall shew thy praise. 

For thou desirest no sacrifice, else would I give it 
thee : but thou delightest not in burnt-offerings. 

The sacrifice of God is a troubled spirit : a broken 
and contrite heart, God, shalt thou not despise. 

be favourable and gracious unto Sion : build 
thou the walls of Jerusalem. 

Then shalt thou be pleased with the sacrifice of 
righteousness, with the burnt-offerings and oblations; 
then shall they offer young bullocks upon thine altar. 

Glory be to the Father. 



€it Venitential Realms. [57 



Slgaiitfit abarice. 

PsAL. cii. Domine, exattdu 

Hear my prayer, Lord : and let my crying come 
unto thee. 

Hide not thy face from me in the time of my 
trouble : incline thine ear unto me when I call ; 
hear me, and that right soon. 

For my days are consumed away like smoke : and 
my bones are burnt up as it were a fire-brand. 

My heart is smitten down, and withered like 
grass : so that I forget to eat my bread. 

For the Yoice of my groaning : my bones will 
scarce cleave to my flesh. 

I am become like a pelican in the wilderness : 
and like an owl that is in the desert. 

I have watched, and am even as it were a sparrow ; 
that sitteth alone upon the house-top. 
• Mine enemies revile me all the day long : and they 
that are mad upon me are sworn together against me. 

For I have eaten ashes as it were bread : and 
mingled my drink with weeping ; 

And that because of thine indignation and wrath : 
for thou hast taken me up and cast me down. 

My days are gone like a shadow : and I am 
withered like grass. 

But thou, Lord, shalt endure for ever : and thy 
remembrance throughout all generations. 

Thou shalt arise and have mercy upon Sion : for 
it is time that thou have mercy upon her, yea, the 
time is come. 

And why 1 thy servants think upon her stones : 
and it pitieth them to see her in the dust. 

The heathen shall fear thy Name, Lord : and all 
the kings of the earth thy Majesty *, \ 



58] Vrasers tor fit 19ealr. 

When the Lord shall build up Sion ; and 
his glory shall appear ; 

When he tumeth him unto the prayer of th- 
destitute : and despiseth not their desire. 

This shall be written for those that come j 
and the people which shall be bom shall prai 
Lord. 

For he hath looked down from his sanctuary 
of the heaven did the Lord behold the earth ; 

That he might hear the mournings of such 
in captivity : and deliver the children app 
unto death ; 

That they may declare the Name of the L( 
Sion : and his worship at Jerusalem ; 

When the people are gathered together : an 
kingdoms also, to serve the Lord. 

He brought down my strength in my jou] 
and shortened my days. 

But I said, my God, take me not away i 
midst of mine age ; as for thy years they e 
throughout all generations. 

Thou, Lord, in the beginning hast laid dovi 
foundation of the earth : and the heavens a] 
work of thy hands. 

They shall perish, but thou shalt endure : tt 
shall wax old as doth a garment ; 

And as a vesture shalt thou change then 
they shall be changed : but thou art the sam 
thy years shall not fail. 

The children of thy servants shall continue 
their seed shall stand fast in thy sight. 

Glory be to the Father. 



C9e 9enttential Ssalms. [59 



; 



against Cfnbs. 

PsAL. cxxx. Deprofundis, 

Out of the deep have I called unto thee, Lord ; 
Lord, hear my voice. 

let thine ears consider well : the voice of my 
complaint. 

If thou, Lord, wilt be extreme to mark what is 
done amiss : Lord, who may abide it ? 

For there is mercy with thee : therefore shalt thou 
be feared. 

1 look for the Lord ; my soul doth wait for him : 
in his word is my trust. 

My soul fleeth unto the Lord : before the morning 
watch, I say, before the morning watch. 

Israel, trust in the Lord, for with the Lord there 
is mercy : and with him is plenteous redemption. 

And he shall redeem Israel : from all his sins. 

Glory be to the Father. 

against Jlblot]^. 

PsAL. cxliii. Domine, eacaudi. 

Hear my prayer, Lord, and consider my desire : 
hearken unto me for thy truth and righteousness' 
sake. 

And enter not into judgement with thy servant : 
for in thy sight shall no man living be justified. 

For the enemy hath persecuted my soul ; he hath 
smitten my life down to the ground ; he hath laid 
me in the darkness as the men that have been long 
dead. 

Therefore is my spirit vexed within me : and my 
heart within me is desolate. 

Yet do I remember the time past \ \ TXixsiafc 'vs::^^^ 



60] VraserB tot t(e 19ealr. 



all thy works ; yea I exercise myself in the works 
of thy hands. 

I stretch forth my hands unto thee : my soul 
gaspeth unto thee as a thirsty land. 

Hear me, Lord, and that soon, for my spirit 
waxeth faint : hide not thy face from me, lest I be 
like unto them that go down into the pit. 

let me hear thy loving-kindness betimes in the 
morning, for in thee is my trust : shew thou me the 
way that I should walk in, for I lift up my soul unto 
thee. 

Deliver me, Lord, from mine enemies : for I 
flee unto thee to hide me. 

Teach me to do the thing that pleaseth thee, for 
thou art my God : let thy loving Spirit lead me 
forth into the land of righteousness. 

Quicken me, Lord, for thy Name's sake : and__ 
for thy righteousness' sake bring my soul out o 
trouble. 

And of thy goodness slay mine enemies : and de- 
stroy all them that vex my soul ; for I am thy ser- 
vant. 

Glory be to the Father. 

Ant. Remember not. Lord, our offences, nor the 
offences of our forefathers; neither take thou ven.- 
geance of our sins : spare us, good Lord, spare thy 
people whom thou hast redeemed with thy most pre- 
cious blood ; be not angry with us for ever ; and give 
not thine heritage to destruction ; forget us not for 
ever. 



C|e Hitans* [61 



A LITANY, 

proper to be said on the Rogation and other Prayer Days, and 
e^ciaUy on Week Days in Lent. 



Lord, have mercy upon us. 

Lord, have viercy upon vs. 
Christ, have mercy upon us. 

Christ, have mercy upon us. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. 

Lord, have mercy upon us. 
Christ, hear us. 

Christ, hear us. 
God the Father, of heaven : have mercy upon us. 

God the Father, of heaven : have m^rcy upon us, 
God the Son, Redeemer of the world : have mercy 
upon us. 

God the Son, Redeemer of the world : have 
m£rcy upon us, 
God the Holy Ghost : have mercy upon us. 

God the Holy Ghost : have Toercy upon us, 
O holy Trinity, one God : have mercy upon us. 

holy Trinity, one God \ have mercy upon us. 
Be favourable ; Spare us, good Lord. 

From all evil ; Good Lord, deliver us. 

Note. The following Litany is taken, with certain omissions, 
from the Salisbury Breviary, i. e. one of the Service Books of the 
English Church before the Reformation, and is probably the origi- 
nal on which that in our present Prayer Book is founded. At 
the end is appended a list of the Saints as they used to be ad- 
dressed immediately after the inyocation of the blessed Trinity, 
the words *' pray for us" following each name. x 



62] 9taser0 for tl^e ISealr. 

From the snares of the devil; Good Lord, deliver us. 
From eternal damnation ; Good Lord, deliver tis. 

From the peril of our sins hanging over us ; 

Good Lord, deliver vs. 
From possession by evil spirits; 

Good Lord, deliver us. 
From the spirit of fornication ; Good Lord, deliver us. 
From the desire of vain glory ; Good Lord, deliver us. 
From all uncleanness of mind and body ; 

Good Lord, deliver usy 
From anger, and hatred, and all malice ; 

Good Lord, deliver us. 
Froni impure thoughts ; Good Lord, deliver us. 

From blindness of heart ; Good Lord, deliver us. 

From lightning and tempest; Good Lord, deliver us. 
From sudden and unexpected death ; 

Good Lord, deliver us* 
By the mystery of thy holy Incarnation ; 

Good Lord, deliver us. 
By thy Nativity ; Good Lord, deliver us. 

By thy Baptism ; Good Lord, deliver m. 

By thy Fasting ; Good Lord, deliver us. 

By thy Cross and Passion ; Good Lord, deliver us. 
By thy precious Death ; Good Lord, deliver' us. 

By thy glorious Resurrection ; Good Lord, deliver us. 
By thy wonderful Ascension ; Good Lord, deliver us. 
By the Grace of the Holy Ghost, the Comforter ; 

Good Lord, deliver us. 
In the hour of death ; Succour us, good Lord. 

In the Day of Judgement ; Good Lord, deliver tis. 
We sinners Beseech thee to hear VA. 

That thou wouldest grant us peace ; 

We beseech thee to hear us. 
That thy mercy and goodness may keep us ; 

We beseech thee to hear tis. 
That it may please thee to rule and defend thy 
Ch urch ; We beseech, thee to IveaT •«&, 



/ 



€it Eitans. [()3 



THat it may please thee to keep our Bishops and 
Clergy in the true worshipping of thee ; 

We beseech thee to hear us. 
That it may please thee to give our Queen and 
governors peace, true concord, and victory ; 

We beseech tJiee to Jiear us. 
That it may please thee to keep the congregations of 
aU Saints in thy service ; 

We beseech thee to hear u^. 
That it may please thee to keep all Christian people 
redeemed with thy precious blood ; 

We beseech thee to hear us. 
That thou wouldest reward all our benefactors ever- 
lastingly ; We beseech thee to hear us. 
That thou wouldest deliver our souls and the souls 
of our parents from eternal damnation ; 

We beseech thee to Ivear us. 

That it may please thee to give and preserve to our use 

the fruits of the earth ; We beseech thee to hear us. 

That it may please thee to turn the eyes of thy 

mercy upon us ; We beseech tJiee to hear us. 

That thou wouldest make the obedience of our service 

reasonable ; We beseech thee to hear us. 

That thou wouldest raise up our minds to heavenly 

desires ; We beseech tJiee to hear its. 

That thou wouldest be pleased to look upon and 

relieve the sufferings of the poor and the captive ; 

We beseech thee to hear its. 
That thou wouldest grant eternal rest to all the 
faithfiil departed ; We beseech thee to hear us. 

That thou wouldest be pleased to hear us ; 

We beseech thee to hear us. 

Son of God ; We beseech thee to hear 21s. 

Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the 

world ; Hear us, good Lord. 

Lamb of God, that takest away the sins of the 

world ; S'pare us^ good Lord. 



\ 



64] Vras^ts Uv t^t HQeolr. 

Lamb of God, that takest awaj the sins of the 
world j Have rnercy upon vs. 

Lord, have mercy upon us. 

Christ, have merer/ upon us. 
Lord, have mercy upon us. 

Our Father. 

And lead us not into temptation } 
But deliver us from evU. 

Lord, shew thy mercy upon us ; 

And grant us thy salvation. 
And let thy mercy come upon us, Lord. 

Thy salvation according to thy word. 
We have sinned with our fathers. 

We have done wickedly y we have comMitted ini- 
quity. 
Lord, deal not with us after our sins. 

Neither reward us after our iniquities. 

Let us pray for every order of the Church. 

Let thy priests he clothed with righteousness, and 
thy saints sing with joy fulness. 

Let us pray for our brothers and sisters. 

My God, save thy servants and thy handmaids, 
which put their trust in thee. 

Let us pray for all Christian people. 

Lord, save thy people, and bless thine heritage l 
and govern tJiem, and lift them up for ever* 
Lord, let peace be within thy walls ; 

And plenteousness udthin thy palaces. 
May the souls of thy servants and handmaids rest 

in peace. 

Amen, 

Lord, hear my prayer 

And let my crying com^ unto thee. 
The Lord be with you. 
A?id tenth tJiy spir\t. 



C|e Uttans. [G5 



Let us pray. 

Grod, whose nature and property is ever to hare 
mercy and to forgive, receive our humble petitions ; 
and though we be tied and bound with the chain of 
our sins, yet let the pitifulness of thy great mercy 
loose us. 

Almighty and Everlasting God, who alone workest 
great marvels; send down upon our Bishops and 
Curates, and all Congregations committed to their 
charge, the healthful Spirit of thy grace ; and, that 
they may truly please thee, pour upon them the con- 
tinual dew of thy blessing. 

God, who pourest the gift of charity through 
the grace of thy Holy Spirit into the hearts of the 
&,ithful : grant to thy servants and handmaids, our 
brethren and sisters, on whose behalf we beseech thy 
mercy, health of mind and body : that they may love 
thee with their whole strength, and do those things 
which are pleasing to thee with their whole heart. 

God, from whom all holy desires, all good coun- 
sels, and all just works do proceed ; Give unto thy 
servants that peace which the world cannot give ; 
that both our hearts may be set to obey thy com- 
mandments, and also that by thee we being defended 
from the fear of our enemies may pass our time in 
rest and quietness. 

Lord, we beseech thee mercifully to shew thy 
great pity upon us : cleanse us from all our sins, and 
graciously deliver us from those punishments which 
we righteously deserve. 

God, the Maker and Redeemer of all the Faith- 
ful, grant to the souls of thy servants and handmaids 
departed in thy faith the remission of all their sins : 
that the pardon which they have always desired they 
maj hy pious supplications obtain. 
f By thy goodness we beseecli t\ieft, \kQiT\^\<;i^'^^ 



\ 



6Q'\ Vrasetft tor fit 19ealr. 

the chains of our sins ; and keep us thy servants 
and all Catholic people in true holiness ; and those 
who are united to us by relationship, friendship, 
or creed, even all Christian men, do thou purge 
from vice, and adorn with virtue. Give unto us peace 
and safety ; Ac^p far our foes visible and invisible ; 
drive away all^gickness ; pour down upon our friends 
and enemies Ihe gift of charity, and to ail the faith- 
ful, living^and departed, grant life and .eternal rest : 
Through the same Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Prevent us, Lord, in all our doings with thy 
most gracious favour, and further us with thy con- 
tinual help, that in all our works begun, continued, 
and ended in thee, we may glorify thy holy Name, 
and finally" by thy mercy obtain everlasting life. 

Almighty, everlasting God, who art Lord both of 
the quick and the dead, and hast pity upon all men, 
whom thou foreknowest to be thine by faith and 
works : we humbly beseech thee, that they for whom 
we desire to pray, both those whom the present world 
retains and those who are delivered from the burden 
of the flesh, at the intercession of thy Saints, may 
obtain pardon for all their sins by the pitifulness of 
thy goodness. Through Jesus Christ our Lord, who 
livest and reignest in the unity of the Holy Ghost, 
God for ever and ever. 

The Lord be with you. 
And with thy spirit. 

May the Almighty and Merciful God hear us. 
Amen. 

And may the souls of the faithftil, through the 
mercy of God, rest in peace. 
Amen, 



ULit Ettatis. 



[67 



LIST OF SAINTS 
:ently addressed in the litany by the 
chtjkch op england. 



Mary. 

Mother of God. 
Virgin of Virgins. 

Michael. 

Gabriel. 

Eaphael. 

loly Angels and 

jhangels of God. 

►ly orders of Blessed 

rits. 



John Baptist. 

oly Patriarchs and 

phets. 



ter. 
ul. 



St. Andrew. 

St. John. 

St. James. 

St. Thomas. 

St. Philip. 

St. James. 

St. Matthew. 

St. Bartholomew. 

St. Simon. 

St. Thaddffius. 

St. Matthias. 

St. Barnabas. 

St. Mark. 

St. Luke. 

All holy Apostles and 

Evangelists. 
All holy Disciples of the 

Lord and Innocents. 



Monday. 



5phen. 

DUS. 

3tus. 

2mens. 

bian. 

bastian. 

smas. 



St. Damian. 

St. Primus. 

St. Felician. 

St. Denys with his asso- 
ciates. 

St. Victor with his asso- 
ciates. 



The fint list ia common to eyery day •, \5aft t^^X «sfc «^ 
o the different days of the week. 



68] 



9ta9er0 for ti^e I9ealr. 



All holy Martyrs. 

St. Sylvester. 

St. Leo. 

St. Jerome. 

St. Augustine. 

St. Isidore. 

St. Julian. 

St. Gildard. 

St. Medard. 

St. Albinus. 

St. Eusebius. 

St. Swithun. 

St. Birinus. 

All holy Confessors. 

All holy Monks and 



St. Mary Magdalene 
St. Mary of Egypt. 
St. Margaret. 
St. Scholastica. 
St. Petronilla. 
St. Genovefa. 
St. Praxeda. 
St. Sotera. 
St. Prisca. 
St. Thecla- 
St. Afra. 
St. Editha. 
All holy Virgins. 
All Saints. 
Hermits. 



Tuesday, 



St. Thomas. 

St. Sixtus. 

St. Cornelius. 

St. Cyprian. 

St. John. 

St. Paul. 

St. Marcellinus. 

St. Peter. 

St. Vitus. 

St. Modestus. 

St. Adrian. 

St. Nicasius with his as- 
sociates. 

St. Eustachius with his 
associates. 

All holy Martyrs. 
St QregOTj. 
St Augustine. 



St. Ambrose. 

St. Remigius. 

St. Donatian. 

St. Eligius. 

St. Audomar. 

St. Sulpicius. 

St. Patemus. 

St. Patrick. 

St. Dunstan. 

St. Grimbald. 

All holy Confessors. 

All holy Monks ai 

Hermits. 
St. Felicitas. 
St. Perpetua. 
St. Columba. 



€it Ettang. 



[69 



St. Euphemia. 
St. Eugenia. 
St. Gertrude. 
St. Regenfleda. 
St. Batilda. 



St. Anastasia. 
St. Etheldreda. 
All holy Virgins. 
All Saints. 



Wednesday. 



St. Lawrence. 

St. Tyburt. 

St. Valerian. 

St. Protheus. 

St. Hyacinth. 

St. Abdon. 

St. Sennes. 

St. Timothy. 

St. ApoUonaris. 

St. Satuminus. 

St. Maurice with his as- 
sociates. 

St. Gereon with his asso- 
ciates. 

All holy Martyrs. 

St. Hilary. 

St. Martin. 

St. Briccius. 

St. Amandus. 

St. Vedastus. 

St. German. 

St. Ausbert. 



St. Volfran. 

St. Amulph. 

St. Sylvinus. 

St. Taurinus. 

St. Cuthbert. 

All holy Confessors. 

All holy Monks and 

Hermits. 
St. Agatha. 
St. Susanna. 
St. Briget. 
St. Barbara. 
St. Marina. 
St. Martina. 
St. Felicula. 
St. Julita. 
St. Sapientia. 
St. Faith. 
St. Hope. 
St. Charity. 
All holy Virgins. 
All Saints. 



St. Vincent. 
St. Gervasius. 
St. Prothasius. 
St Timothy. 



Thursday, 

St. Simphorian. 
St. Felicissimus. 
St. Agapet. 
St, AXbau. 



\ 



70] 



9ra&er0 lor tfie ]9ealr. 



St. Gorgonius. 

St. Achilleus. 

St. Hippoljtus with his 
associates. 

St. Lucian with his asso- 
ciates. 

All holy Martyrs. 

St. Nicolaus. 

St. Audoenus. 

St. Romanus. 

St. Laudus. 

St. Machutus. 

St. Sanson. 

St. Placidus. 

St. Columban. 

St. Anthony. 

St. Macarius. 

St. Richard. 



St. Ethelwold. 

All holy Confessors. 

All holy Monks and 

Hermits. 
St. Cecilia. 
St. Faith. 
St. Austreberta. 
St. Emerentiana. 
St. Potentiana. 
St. Opportuna. 
St. Sophia. 
St. Juliana. 
St. Beatrice. 
St. Crescentia. 
St. Walburga. 
St. Ermenilda 
All holy Virgins. 
All Saints. 



Friday. 



L 



St. Quintin. 

St. Christopher. 

St. Lambert. 

St. George. 

St. Marcellus. 

St. Theodore. 

St. Valentine. 

St. Chrysogonus. 

St. Felix. 

St. Adauctus. 

St. Boniface with his as- 
sociates. 

St. Kylian with his as- 
sociates. 

All holy Martyrs. 
St Benedict, 



St. Maurus. 

St. Maiolus. 

St. ^gidius. 

St. Wandregisillus. 

St. Wolmar. 

St. Philibert. 

St. Bertinus. 

St. Winnoc. 

St. Judoc. 

St. Petroc. 

St. Botulph. 

All holy Confessors. 

All holy Monks and 

Hermits. 
St. Lucy. 



C|r W^iUam, 



[71 



bina. 

stina. 

:&axia. 

usta. 

^negunda. 

degunda. 



St. Radegunda. 
St. Pientia. 
St. Benigna. 
St. Walburga. 
All holy Virgins. 
All Saints. 



Saturday. 



lixtus. 


St. Mammertus. 


rban. 


St. Wilbrord. 


ai^uus. 


St. Leonard. 


enna. 


St. Athanasius. 


ifus. 


St. Oswald. 


ilerius. 


All holy Confessors, 


ocessus. 


All holy Monks and 


artinian. 


mits. 


arcus. 
arcellinus. 


St. Agnes. 
St. Benedicta. 


)rdian with his as- 


St. Martha- 


iates. 


St. Helena. 


mcras with his asso- 

:es. 


St. Euprepia. 
St. Candida. 


3ly Martyrs. 
Idelm. 


St. Basilissa. 
St. Balbina. 


uian. 


St. Ursula. 


mrchus. 


St. Victoria- 


isil. 


St. Corona. 


aurilius. 

arman. 

usbert. 


St. Sexburga. 
All holy V irgins. 
All Saints. 



72] Commenlratton of a 



CJe 0rlrer for tl^e Commenlratton of a JBtpaxtina J^ouL 

[First are said the short LUanies in this mannerJ] 

Lord, have mercy, 

Christ J have mercy. 
Lord, have mercy. 

Be favourable ; S'pare him^ Lord, 

Be favourable ; Deliver him, Lord. 

Be favourable ; Deliver him, Lord, 

From thy wrath. Good Lord, deliver him. 

From the peril of death, Good Lord, deliver him. 
From an evil death, Good Lord, deliver him. 

From the pains of hell, Good Lord, deliver him. 

From all evil. Good Lord, deliver him. 

From the power of the devil. Good Lord, deliver him. 
By thy nativity. Good Lord, deliver him. 

By thy Cross and Passion, Good Lord, deliver him. 
By thy Death and Burial, Good Lord, deliver him. 
By thy glorious Resurrection, 

Good Lord, deliver him. 
By thy wonderful Ascension, Good Lord, deliver him^ 
By the grace of the Holy Ghost, the Comforter, 

Good Lord, deliver him.m^ 
In the day of judgment. Good Lord, deliver hvnu^ 
We sinners, Beseech thee to hear us, good Lord^ 

That thou wouldest spare him. 

We beseech thee to hear us, good Lord^ 
Lord, have mercy, 

Christ, have mercy. 
Lord, have mercy. 

[ Therif when the soul is vexed in the agony of its departure^ ike 
following prayers may he said."] 






Depart, Christian soul, out of this world in the 
/ name ofQod the Fatlier A\mg)tt.ty, ^Vci ct^^\ft.^^^\ 



ISeparttng Jboul. 73] 



in the name of Jesus Christ the Son of the living 
Grod, who suffered for thee : in the name of the Holy 
Ghost, who was poured out on thee : in the name of 
Angels and Archangels : in the name of Thrones 
and Dominions : in the name of Principalities and 
Powers : in the name of Cherubim and Seraphim : 
in the name of the Patriarchs and Prophets : in the 
name of the holy Apostles and Evangelists : in the 
name of the holy Martyrs and Confessors : in the 
name of the holy Monks and Hermits : in the name 
of the holy Virgins and of all the Saints of Gbd j 
may thy place be this day in peace, and thy abode 
in holy Sion : Through the same Christ our Lord. 
I^. Amen. 

God, the merciful, God, the gracious, God, 
who, according to the multitude of thy mercies, 
dost put away the sins of them that truly repent, 
and graciously remittest the guilt of their past of- 
fences, open thine eye of mercy upon this thy servant 
N. and grant him perfect forgiveness of all his sins, 
who with contrite heart most earnestly begs it of 
thee. Renew in him, most loving Father, whatso- 
ever hath been decayed by his own carnal will and 
frailness, or by the fraud and malice of the devil ; 
continue this sick member in the unity of the body 
of the Church. Have mercy, Oh Lord, on his groans, 
have mercy on his tears : and forasmuch as he put- 
teth his full trust only in thy mercy, receive him 
into thy favour : Through Christ our Lord. 

I^. Amen. 

1 commend thee, dearly beloved brother, to the 
Almighty God, and commit thee to him whose crea- 
ture thou art, that, when thou shaltest have paid 
the debt of all mankind by death, thou mayest re- 
tum to thy Maker who formed thee from the dviat of 




74] Ctommenlratton of a 



/ 



the earth. When, therefore, thy soul shall depart 
from thy body, may the resplendent troop of angels 
meet thee : may the judicial court of Apostles receive 
thee : may the triumphant army of martyrs, clad in 
white robes, come out to meet thee : may the Con- 
fessors, shining in pure apparel, encompass thee : 
may the choir of joyful virgins receive thee : may 
a blessed repose in the bosom of the Patriarchs 
await thee : may the countenance of Jesus Christ 
appear to thee mild and cheerful, and may he ap- 
point thee a place amongst those who ever stand 
before him. Mayest thou never know that which 
shudders in darkness, that which gnashes the teeth 
in flames, and that which is vexed in torments : 
may the most wicked Satan, with his crew, give way 
before thee : may he tremble at the approach of thee 
and of thy accompanying angels, and flee away into 
the vast chaos of eternal night. " Let God arise, and 
let his enemies be scattered ; let them also that hate 
him flee before him. Like as the smoke vanisheth, so 
shalt thou drive them away : and like as wax melteth 
at the fire, so let the ungodly perish at the presence of 
God. But let the righteous be glad and rejoice 
before God : let them also be merry and joyful.*' 
May all the legions of hell therefore be confounded, 
and put to shame, and the ministers of Satan dare 
not to hinder thy path. May Christ, who was cruci- 
fied for thee, deliver thee from excruciation. May 
Christ, who vouchsafed to die for thee, deliver thee 
from eternal death. May Christ, the Son of the 
living God, place thee in the ever-verdant lawns of 
his paradise : and he, the true Shepherd, acknow- 
ledge thee amongst his sheep. May he absolve thee 
from all thy sins, and place thee at his right hand 
in the lot of his elect. Mayest thou see thy Re- 
deemer face to face, and, standing ever in his pre- 
sence, behold with blessed eyes the most clear truth. 



1 ISeparttng Jboul. 



[75 



. And, placed among the companies of the blessed, 
I mayest thou enjoy the sweetness of divine contem- 
J plation for ever. 

I^. Amen. ' 






Receive, Lord, the soul of thy servant into the 
place of salvation, which he hopes to obtain from thy 
mercy. 

I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant out of all 
tlie dangers of hell, and from all pain, and out of all 
tribulation. 

I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Enoch and Elijah from the common death 
of the world. 

I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Noah from the flood. 
I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Abraham from Ur of the Chaldees. 
I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Job from his sufferings. 
I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Isaac from being offered up for a burnt 
sacrifice by the hand of his father Abraham. 

I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Lot out of Sodom, and from the flames of 
fire. 

J^. Amen. 



/ 



^ 



76] Commenlration of a 



Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Moses out of the hand of Pharaoh king of 
the Egyptians. 

P^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Daniel out of the den of lions. 
K^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst the three children out of the burning 
fiery furnace, and from the hands of the unjust king. 

I^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Susannah from a false accusation. 
P^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst David from the hands of King Saul, and 
from the hands of Goliath. 

K^. Amen. 

Deliver, Lord, the soul of thy servant, as thou 
deliveredst Peter and Paul out of their prisons. 
B^. Amen. 

And as thou deliveredst the most blessed Thecla, 
Virgin and Martyr, from three most cruel torments, 
so vouchsafe to deliver the soul of this thy servant, 
and cause him to participate in thy heavenly joys. 

P^. Amen. 

The Prayer. 

We commend to thee, Lord, the soul of thy 
servant N., and beseech thee, Lord Jesu Christ, 
Saviour of the World, that, as in mercy to him thou 
becamest man, thou wouldest not refuse him a place 
in the bosom of thy Patriarchs. Acknowledge, 
Lord^ thy creature not made by other gods, but by 
thee the only living and true Gco^ •. iot >iJ!afcT^\^ w^^^ 



ZSeparttng J^ouL [77 



/ 



other God beside thee, and there is none that can do 
as thou doest. Make glad, Lord, his soul in thy 
sight, and remember not his fonner iniquities and 
excesses into which he was led by the violence of 
passion and the corruption of his nature. For al- 
though he hath sinned, yet hath he not denied, but 
believed in, the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost j 
he hath had a zeal for the honour of God, and faith- 
fully worshipped thee, God, the Creator of all 
things. 

The offences of his youth and his ignorances re- 
member not, we beseech thee, Lord : but accord- 
ing to the multitude of thy mercies be mindful of 
him in thy heavenly glory. Let the heavens be 
opened to him ; let the angels rejoice with him. 
Into thy kingdom, Lord, receive thy servant. 
May St. Michael the Archangel of God, who hath 
won the highest place in the heavenly host, receive 
him. May the holy Angels of God come out to meet 
him, and conduct him into the city of the heavenly 
Jerusalem. May blessed Peter the Apostle, to whom 
the keys of the kingdom of heaven were given by 
God, receive him. May St. Paul the Apostle, who 
was counted worthy to be a vessel of election, succour 
him. May St. John the Apostle, elect of God, to 
whom were revealed the secrets of heaven, intercede 
for him. May all the holy Apostles, to whom the • 
Lord gave the power of binding and loosing, pray for 
him. May all the Saints and Elect of God who have 
suffered torments in this world for the name of Christ 
intercede for him : that, being freed from the bonds 
of the flesh, he may be counted worthy to attain the 
glory of the kingdom of heaven ; through the aid of 
our Lord Jesus Christ ; who with the Father and the 
Holy Ghost liveth and reigneth world without end. 

B^. Amen. 



\ 



78] Commenlratton of a 



\If the soul continues in its agonies, these Psalms, namdy, the 
118^^ ConJUemini Domino, and the whole of the W^th in its 
several parts, Beati immaculati, S[c., should be said ; but when 
the sotd is departed, as/oUotos.^ 

B^. Come to his aid, oh ye Saints of God, meet 
him, oh ye angels of the Lord : Receive his soul. 
Present it before the face of the Most High. 

y. May Christ who called thee receive thee, and 
may Angels carry thee into Abraham's bosom. 

Receive his soul : Present it before the face of the 
Most High. 

y. Grant him. Oh Lord, eternal rest : and let 
light perpetual shine upon him. 

Present it before the face of the Most High. 

Lord, have mercy. 

Christ, have mercy. 
Lord, have mercy. 

Our Father. 

y . And lead us not into temptation. 
P^. But deliver us from evil. 

y. Grant him. Oh Lord : eternal rest. 

I^. And let light perpetual : shine upon him. 

y . From the gate of Hell. 
B^. Deliver his soul. Oh Lord. 

y. May he rest in peace. 
B^. Amen. 

")^. Oh Lord, hear my prayer. 

I^. And let my cry come unto thee. 

^. The Lord be with you. 
J^. And with thy spirit. \ 



IBeparttng J^oul [79 



Let us pray. 

To thee, Lord, we commend the soul of thy 
servant N., that, heing dead to the world, he may 
live to thee : and whatsoever he hath committed 
through the frailness of his earthly conversation do 
thou by the grace of thy most merciful pardon wipe 
away. Through Christ our Lord. Amen. 

Or ^tis prayer, from " The Service for the Vtsitatton of the Sick,'''' 
may he said as a conditsion. 

Almighty God, with whom do live the spirits of 
just men made perfect, after they are delivered from 
their earthly prisons : We humbly commend the soul 
of this thy servant N., our dear brother, into thy 
hands, as into the hands of a faithful Creator, and 
most merciful Saviour ; most humbly beseeching thee 
that it may be precious in thy sight. Wash it, we 
pray thee, in the blood of that immaculate Lamb 
that was slain to take away the sins of the world ; 
that whatsoever defilements it may have contracted 
in the midst of this miserable and naughty world, 
through the lusts of the flesh, or the wiles of Satan, 
being purged and done away, it may be presented 
pure and without spot before thee. And teach us 
who survive, in this and other like daily spectacles 
of mortality, to see how frail and uncertain our own 
condition is, and so to number our days, that we may 
seriously apply our hearts to that holy and heavenly 
wisdom, whilst we live here, which may in the 
end bring us to life everlasting, through the merits 
of Jesus Christ, thine only Son our Lord. Amen. 



/ 




BO] 9taser0 for ti^e ]9ealr. 



PRAYERS FOR THE DEAD. 



In the Name of the Father, iji and of the Son, 
and of the Holy Ghost, Amen. 

Our Father, which art in heaven. Hallowed be thy 
Name, Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done in 
earth, As it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily 
bread, And forgive us our trespasses, As we forgive 
them that trespass against us. And lead us not into 
temptation ; But deliver us from evil, Amen. 

THE COLLECT. 

Almighty God, unto whom all hearts be open, all 
desires known, and from whom no secrets are hid ; 
cleanse the thoughts of our hearts by the inspiration 
of thy holy Spirit, that we may perfectly love thee, 
and worthily magnify thy holy Name ; through 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

y. Our help is in the Name of the Lord. 
B^. Who hath made heaven and earth. 

Ant. Remember not. 

PsAL. IL Miserere. Vide page 55, 

AND 

PsAL. cxxx. De Profundis. Vide page 59, 

Ant. Remember not, Lord, our offences, nor the 
offences of our forefathers, neither take thou ven- 
geance of our sins. 

The Sequence. Dies ira. 

That Day of wrath, that dreadful Day, 
When heaven and eartb aball ^ass 2kway, 
Both David and tbe SibyW aay. 



Vrosers for tfje BtsLts. [81 

What terror then shall us befal, 
When lo ! the Judge's steps appal, 
About to sift the deeds of all. 

The mighty trumpet's marvellous tone 
Shall pierce through each sepulchral stone, 
And summon all before the throne. 

Now Death and Nature in amaze 
Behold their Lord his creatures raise, 
To meet the Judge's awful gaze. 

The books are open'd, that the dead 
May have their doom from what is read, 
The records of our conscience dread. 

At length the Judge His seat hath ta'en. 
And nothing hidden may remain, 
While each receives its mead of pain. 

What then shall I most wretched say 1 

Or whom to advocate me pray? 

When scarce the just is saved that Day. 

Oh King, of dread inspiring face, 
Who savest freely. Fount of Grace, 
Amongst thy saved ones grant me place. 

Remember, Jesu, for my sake 
Thou didst thy manhood undertake. 
Thou wilt not, Lord, thine own forsake 1 

In weariness thy sheep was sought ; 
Upon the Cross his life was bought ; 
Alas I if all in vain were wrought. 

Thou, Righteous Judge, that dost repay. 
Oh grant me pardon while I may. 
Before that fearM reckoning Day. 



82] Vtasem for f^ WteiH. 

In sense of guilt I wretched groan ; 

Mine eyes with conscious shame cast down ; 

spare me suppliant at thy throne. 

For Thou, who loosedst Mary's grief, 
And heardst upon thy Cross the thief, 
E'en me hast granted hope's relief 

My feeble prayers can make no claim, 
Yet, gracious Lord, for thy great Name, 
Redeem me £rom the quenchless flame. 

Amongst the sheep, Oh bid me stand, 
And severed from the goats' lost band^ 
Dispose me on thy glad right hand. 

When Thou the cursed shalt confound. 
In bitter chains for ever bound, 
Let me amongst the blest be found. 

In suppliant prayer I prostrate bend, 
My contrite heart, like ashes, rend, 
Regard, Lord, my latter end. 

Oh ! on that Day, that tearful Day, 
When man to judgment wakes from clay, 
Be Thou the trembling sinner's stay. 
And spare him, God, we humbly pray. 

Holy Jesu, Lord Most High, 

Grant them rest for whom we cry. Ampn. 

y . Grant them, Lord, eternal rest. 

B^. And let light perpetual shine upon them. 

f. From the gate of hell, 

P^. Deliver their souls, Lord. 

y. May they rest in peace. 
i^. Amen, x 



Vrasem tax tfle SeaH. [83 



y. Oh Lord, hear my prayer. 

I^ And let my cry come unto thee. 

y". The Lord be with you. 
1^ And with thy spirit. 



Let us pray. 

God, the Creator and Redeemer of all the Faith- 
ful, grant to the souls of thy servants and handmaids, 
N. and N., the remission of all their sins : that 
through pious supplications they may obtain the 
pardon they have always desired. Who livest and 
reignest with God the Father in the unity of the 
Holy Ghost, God for ever and ever. Amen, 

The Epistle is written 

1 Cor. XV. 51. 

Behold I show you a mystery; We shall not all 
sleep, but we shall all be changed. In a moment, in 
the twinkling of an eye, at the last trump ; for the 
trumpet shall sound, and the dead shall be raised 
incorruptible, and we shall be changed. For this 
corruptible must put on incorruption, and this mortal 
must put on immortality. So when this corruptible 
shall have put on incorruption, and this mortal shall 
have put on immortality, then shall be brought to 
pass the saying that is written. Death is swallowed 
up in victory. Death, where is thy sting ? 
Grave, where is thy victory 1 The sting of death is 
sin ; and the strength of sin is the law. But thanks 
be to God, which giveth us the victory through our 
Lord Jesus Christ. 

Here endeth tlie E^\sA&. 



84] Vrasers tor tfle 19ea)l. 



The Holy Gospel is written 
John v. 25. 

B^. Glory be to thee, Lord. 

Verily, verily, I say unto you, the hour is coming, 
and now is, when the dead shall hear the voice of the 
Son of God : and they that hear shall live. For as 
the Father hath life in himself; so hath he given to 
the Son to hava life in himself. And hath given him 
authority to execute judgment also, because he is the 
Son of Man. Marvel not at this : for the hour is com- 
ing, in the which all that are in the graves shall hear 
his voice, and shall come forth ; they that have done 
good, unto the resurrection of life ; and they that 
have done evil, unto the resurrection of damnation. 

Thanks be to God. 

I believe in one God, the Father Almighty, 
Maker of heaven and earth, And of all things visible 
and invisible : 

And in one Lord Jesus Christ, the only begotten 
Son of God, Begotten of his Father before all worlds, 
God of God, Light of Light, Very God of very God, 
Begotten, not made. Being of one substance with the 
Father ; By whom all things were made : Who for us 
men, and for our salvation came down from heaven. 
And was incarnate by the Holy Ghost of the Virgin 
Mary, And was made man, And was crucified also for 
us under Pontius Pilate. He suffered and was buri- 
ed, And the third day he rose again according to the 
Scriptures, And ascended into heaven. And sitteth on 
the right hand of the Father. And he shall come 
again with glory to judge both the quick and the 
dead : Whose kingdom shall have no end. 

And I believe in the Holy Ghost, The Lord and 
Giver of life, Who proceedeth from the Father and 
the Soiij Who with the Father and the Son together 
is worshipped and glorified, 'W^o ai^ik^ Vj VJaa^T^ 



Vrasers tor t^e Btats. [85 

phets. And I believe one Catholick and Apostolick 
Church. I acknowledge one Baptism for the remis- 
sion of sins, And I look for the Resurrection of the 
dead, And the life of the world to come. Amen. 

y. The Lord be with you. 
I^, And with thy spirit. 

Let us pray. 

Lord Jesu Christ, King of Glory, deliver the 
souls of all the faithful departed from the pains of 
hell, and from the deep lake : deliver them from the 
mouth of the lion, lest hell swallow them up, and 
they fe,ll into darkness : and let thy standard-bearer 
St. Michael bring them to that holy light, which 
thou hast promised of old to Abraham and to his 
seed for ever. 

I^. Amen. 

y. Grant them, Lord, eternal rest. 

I^ And let light perpetual shine upon them. 

y. May they rest in peace. 
I^. Amen. 



a CDmmemoratibe Ifivautv for t^t Beats, 

Proper to be said at holy Communion^ after the Prayer ofConse' 

cration. 

Remember, Lord, thy servants and thy hand- 
maids, N. and N., who are departed before us with 
the sign of faith, and rest in the sleep of peace. 

[Here pray /or aU whom you intend,] 

To these, Lord, and to all that rest in Christ, 
grant, we beseech thee, the place of refreshment, light 
and peace. Through Christ o\rc liot^, ksEkSscu 




86] Vrasets tat t)e SeaH. 

Or the following, taken from the " Prayer for ike vhole slate of 
Christ s Church,'' in ike first Conmon Projfer Book if King 
Edward the Sixtk, 

"We commend unto thy mercy, Lord, all thy 
servants which are departed hence from us with the 
sign of faith, and now do rest in the sleep of peace. 
Grant unto them, we beseech thee, thy mercy and 
everlasting peace, and that at the day of the generaL 
resurrection we, and all they which be of the mystical 
Body of thy Son, may altogether be set on his rights 
hand, and hear that his most joyfiil voice : Oom^ 
unto me, ye that be blessed of my Father, and in — 
herit the kingdom which is prepared for you, fro: 
the foundation of the world. Grant this, Father-. 
for Jesus Christ's sake, our only Mediator and Advi 
cate, Amen." 



a Collect, ^UAlt, antt CrosyeL 

Which may he substUvied in place of Ihe foregoing^ on ike dag ofibe 

death or burioL 

THE COLLECT. 

God, whose nature and property is ever to have 
mercy and to forgive ; we humbly pray thee for the 
soul of thy servant N., whom thou hast to-day called 
out of this world. Deliver him not into the hands of I 
his enemy, nor forget him for ever; but give thy 
holy Angels charge to receive him, and to bring him 
into Paradise ; that, forasmuch as he put his trust 
and confidence in thee, he may not endure the pains 
of hell, but enjoy eternal bliss. Through our Lord 
Jesus Christ, thy Son, who liveth and reigneth with 
thee in the unity of the Holy Ghost, God for ever 
and ever. Amen. 

1 Thes& iy. 13. 

But I would not have you to \>ft \gaOT«JiVo»^^3sa«5i, 



\ 



Vrasetfi tor tit ISeolr. [87 



concerning them which are asleep, that ye sorrow not 
even as others which have no hope. For if we be- 
lieve that Jesus died and rose again, even so them 
also which sleep in Jesus will God bring with him. 
For this we say unto you by the word of the Lord, that 
we which are alive and remain unto the coming of the 
Lord shall not prevent them which are asleep. For 
the Lord himself shall descend from heaven with a 
shout, with the voice of the Archangel, and with the 
trump of God : and the dead in Christ shall rise 
first : Then we which are alive and remain shall be 
caught up together with them in the clouds, to meet 
the Lord in the air : and so shall we ever be with 
the Lord. Wherefore comfort one another with these 
words. 

John zi. 21. 

Then said Martha unto Jesus, Lord, if thou hadst 
been here, my brother had not died. But I know 
that even now whatsoever thou wilt ask of God, God 
will give it thee. Jesus saith unto her. Thy brother 
shall rise again. Martha saith unto him, I know 
that he shall rise again in the resurrection at the 
'last day. Jesus said unto her, I am the resurrection 
and the life : he that believeth in me, though he were 
dead, yet shall he live ; and whosoever liveth and 
believeth in me shall never die. Believest thou this 1 
She saith unto him. Yea, Lord : I believe that thou 
art the Christ, the Son of God, which should come 
into the world. 



On the Third, Seventh, or Thirtieth day after the decease or burial, 
the accompanying CoUect^ with the same Epistle and Gospel, 
may he used, 

THE COLLECT. 

We beseech thee, Lord, that thou wouldest be 
pleased to admit the soul oi tViy ^et:N^iXi\.^»^^'b^3wvrf^^ 



88] Vraser0 tor t|e SeoH. 



seventh, or thirtieth day of whose death or interment 
we commemorate, into the fellowship of thy Saints 
and Elect, and that thou wouldest pour upon him 
the perpetual dew of thy mercy. Through our Lord. ' 



A Collect, iLe00on» anlr iSonkj^l, 

Which may he used on the Anniversary of a Dead Person, 

THE COLLECT. 

God, the Lord of all mercy and forgiveness, gran't^ 
unto the souls of thy servants and handmaids, th^ 
anniversary of whose interment we commemorate, th 
place of refreshment, the blessedness of rest, and th 
brightness of thy divine light. Through our Lord. 

2 Maccabees zii. 43. 

And when Judas had made a gathering throughoui> 
the company to the sum of two thousand drachms of 
silver, he sent it to Jerusalem to offer a sin-offering, 
doing therein very well and honestly, in that he was 
mindful of the resurrection : for if he had not hoped 
that they that were slain should have risen again, it 
had been superfluous and vain to pray for the dead. 
And also in that he perceived that there was great 
favour laid up for those that died godly, it was an 
holy and good thought. Whereupon he made a re- 
conciliation for the dead, that they might be deli- 
vered from sin. 

John yi. 37. 

All that the Father giveth me shall come to me ; 
and him that cometh to me I will in no wise cast 
out. For I came down from heaven not to do mine 
own will, but the will of him that sent me. And 
this is the Father's will which hath sent me, that of 
all which he hath given me 1 akoxM \o^^ TL^^i^Dccs^!^ 



r 



9raser0 tor tfle Healr. [89 

but should raise it up again at the last daj. And 
this is the will of him that sent me, that every one 
which seeth the Son and believeth on him may have 
everlasting life : and I will raise him up at the last 
day. 

a iLe00on anH (Sosyel, 

Which may be used at all times, ivith an appropriate Collect, 
selected from those above. 

Rev. xiv. 13. 

I heard a voice from heaven saying unto me, 
Write, Blessed are the dead which die in the Lord 
from henceforth : Yea, saith the Spirit, that they 
may rest from their labours; and their works do 
follow them. 

John yi. 51. 

Jesus said unto them : I am the living bread 
which came down from heaven ; if any man eat of 
this bread, he shall live for ever : and the bread 
which I will give is my flesh, which I will give for 
the life of the world. The Jews therefore strove 
among themselves, saying, How can this man give 
us his flesh to eat 1 Then Jesus said unto them, 
Verily, verily, I say unto you. Except ye eat the 
flesh of the Son of Man, and drink his blood, ye 
have no life in you. Whoso eateth my flesh and 
drinketh my blood hath eternal life : and I will 
raise him up at the last day. 



/ 



90] 9rasets tot tfe 1B$^. 

nn 2U(ompatttinent to t^t IButial 3^tthU$. 

This Accompaniment contains those Prayers for the Dead wkieh 
are found in Edward the Siaik'^s Jitvt Prayer Bookj as weU as 
other appropriate Psalms and Antiphons, 

{Be/ore the Corpse is carried out of the house, ihe/oUowinff Psalm 
may be said.] 

Antiphon. If thou, Lord, wilt be extreme. 

PsAL. cxzx. Deprofundis. 

Out of the deep have I called unto thee, Lord: 
Lord, hear my voice. 

&c. &c Vide page 69. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. If thou, Lord, wilt be extreme to mark what 
is done amiss : Lord, who may abide it ? 

[On the way to Church the/oUoufing Psalm,] 

Ant. That the bones which thou hast broken may 
rejoice. 

PsAL. IL Miserere. 

Have mercy upon me, God, after thy great 
goodness : according to the multitude of thy mercies 
do away mine offences. 

&c. &c. Vide page 55. 
{And, if time and opportunity permit. Psalms cxyL cxxxix. cxzxtL] 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest. 

And let light perpetual : shine upon them. 

Ant. That the bones which thou hast broken may 
rejoice. 

[Repeat the Antiphon going into Church. Then say privately,] 

Come to his aid, ye Saints of God ; meet him, 
ye Angels of the Lord. Receive his soul. Present 
it before the face of the Most High. May Christ, 



Vroseiv fot % Bealr. 9i] 



who called thee, receive thee, and may Angels carry 
thee into Abraham's bosom. 

Receive his soul. Present it before the face of the 
Most High. 

Y. Grant him, Lord ; eternal rest. 

K^ And let light perpetual : shine upon him. 

Present it before the face of the Most High. 

[Jlf time allow f add the /oUounng prayers^ first saymg the Lord*s 
Prayer,'] 

Our Father, &c. 

And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us 
from evil. 

y. Enter not into judgment with thy servant, 
Lord. 

I^ For in thy sight shall no man living be 
justified. 

From the gate of hell. 
Deliver his soul, Lord. 

May he rest in peace. 
Amen. 

Lord, hear my prayer. 
I^. And let my cry come unto thee. 

Let us pray. 

Absolve, Lord, we beseech thee, the soul of thy 
servant N. from the chain of all his sins : that, being 
raised in the glory of the resurrection, he may be 
refreshed amongst thy Saints and Elect. Through 
Christ our Lord. Amen. 

[Chnngfrom the Church to the grave, say as /oUows,'] 

May the Angels bring thee into Paradise : may 
the Martyrs receive thee at thy coming, and lead 
thee into the holy city Jerusalem. May the choir 
of Angels receive thee, and, with the once poor La- 
zarus, mayest thou have eternal rest ! 



92] Vrasent fin: tl^e SeaH. 



/ 



[Commg to the grave^ while the body is lowered into (he earth, Kty,] 

" We commend thy soul to God the Father Al- 
mighty, and thy body to the ground." 

[And tohen time allows, say the following^ 
From the first Book of Common Prayer, 

Let US pray. 

We commend into the hands of thy mercy, most 
merciful Father, the soul of this our brother N. de- 
parted, and his body we commit to the earth, be- 
seeching thine infinite goodness to give us grace to 
live in thy fear and love, and to die in thy fevour : 
that, when the judgment shall come which thou hast 
committed to thy well-beloved Son, both this our 
brother, and we, may be found acceptable in thy 
sight, and receive that blessing which thy well-be- 
loved Son shall then pronounce to all that love and 
fear thee, saying. Come, ye blessed children of my 
Father, receive the kingdom prepared for youfrom 
the beginning of the world. Grant this, merciful 
Father, for the honour of Jesus Christ, our only Sa- 
viour, Mediator and Advocate. Amen. 

[ This Prayer also may be added,"] 
From live first Book of Common Prayer, 

Almighty God, we give thee hearty thanks for 
this thy servant, whom thou hast delivered from the 
miseries of this wretched world, from the body of 
death and all temptation; and, as we trust, hast 
brought his soul, which he committed into thy holy 
hands, into sure consolation and rest. Grant, we 
beseech thee, at the day of judgment, his soul, and 
all the souls of thy Elect, departed out of this life, 
may with us, and we with them, fully receive thy 
promises, and be made perfect altogether, through 
the glorious resurrection of thy Son Jesus Christ our 
Lord, Amen. 



9ras^V0 tor t1)e ISealr. [93 



[ThefoUowvng Prayer map be said just before leaving the grave."] 

God, by whose mercy the souls of the faithful 
rest in peace, be pleased to bless this grave, and 
depute thy holy angel to guard it. Absolve the 
souls of them whose bodies here are buried from the 
chain of all their sins, that they may evermore 
rejoice in Thee, with thy Saints, world without end, 
through Christ our Lord. Amen. 

{Returning home, my the Song of Zackarias.'] 

Ant. I am the Resurrection. 

Benedictus, 

Blessed be the Lord God of Israel : for he hath 
visited and redeemed his people. 

&c. &c. Vide page 37. 

Grant them, Lord : eternal rest, &c. 

Ant, I am the Resurrection and the Life, saith 
the Lord : he that believeth in me, though , he were 
dead, yet shall he live; and whosoever liveth and 
believeth in me, shall never die. 

[Being returned home, say the following Psatm."] 
PsAL. xlii. Quemadmodum. 

Like as the hart desireth the water-brooks : so 
longeth my soul after thee, God. 

&c &c. Vide page 25. 

Grant them, Lord ; eternal rest, &c. 

Colled as in first Book of Common Prayer, 

merciful God, the Father of our Lord Jesus 
Christ, who is the resurrection and the life : in 
whom whosoever believeth shall live though he die ; 
and whosoever liveth and believeth in him shall not 
die eternally : who also hath taught us by his holy 
Apostle Paul not to be sorry as men without hope 
for them that sleep in him : we meekly \^^^^\s. ^l&kS^^ 



\ 



94] 9ni8rr0 tot tit Be«Ar. 



FaMier^ to raise us from the death of sin unto the 
life of righteousness, that when we shall depart this 
life we may sleep in him (as our hope is this our 
brother doth), and at the general resurrection in the 
last day, both we and this our brother departed, re- 
ceiving again our bodies and rising again in thy 
most gracious fevour, may, with all thine elect Saints, 
obtain eternal joy. Grant this, Lord God, by tho 
means of our Advocate Jesus Christ : who with thee 
and the Holy Ghost liveth and reigneth, one Gocl, 
for ever. Amen. 

1 Thess. iv. 13, to end. Vide supra^page 86. 
John tl 37 to 40. Vide siqfra, page 88. 

Let us pray. 

Lord, with whom do live the spirits of them 
that depart hence in the Lord : and with whom the 
souls of the faithful, after they are delivered from the 
burden of the flesh, are in joy and felicity, grant 
unto this thy servant N. that the sins which he com- 
mitted in this world be not imputed unto him, but 
that he escaping the gates of hell and pains of eternal 
darkness, may ever dwell in the region of light, with 
Abraham, Isaac, and Jacob, in the place where is no 
weeping, sorrow, nor heaviness : and when that 
dreadful day of the general resurrection shall come, 
make him also to rise with the just and righteous, 
and to receive his body again to glory, there made pure 
and incorruptible : set him on the right hand of 
thy Son Jesus Christ, among thy holy and elect, that 
he may hear with them those most sweet and com- 
fortable words. Come ye blessed of my Father, inherit 
the kingdom prepared for you from the beginning of 
the world. Grant this, we beseech thee, merciful 

/Father, through Jesus Chriat oxlt Mediator and B^ 
deemer. Amen. 



r 



Viaim fnr t|r BrA. [»5 



/ 



AtiiB Bmriai Qfi*fiaMi$ Aejhn^oiMff Ptalmt ami Pr^^urt orv mot 

to bt mtetk, imi (Ae/iWi^owivj^, 

l&/on t&ejvmer\i/.] 

Ain. Blessed be the Name of the Lord. 

PsAL. cxiiL LaudaU puerL 

Praise the Lord, ye servants : praise the Name 
of the Lord. 

Blessed be the Xame of the Lord : from this time 
forth for evermore. 

The Lord's Name is praised : from the rising \ip 
of the sun unto the going down of the Siuno. 

The Lord is high above all heathen : and his glory 
above the heavens. 

Who is like unto the Lord our GihI, that hath his 
dwelling so high : and yet humbloth hiinsolf to be- 
hold the things that are in heaven and ourth i 

He taketh up the simple out of the dust : and 
lifteth the poor out of the mire ; 

That he may set him with the princes : even with 
the princes of his people. 

He maketh the barren woman to koop houso : and 
to be a joyful mother of children. 

Glory be to the Father, &c. 

Ant. Blessed be the Name of the Lonl, from this 
time forth for evermore. 

[Going to Clnirch^ or on I'utvnnt;, | 

Ant. He shall receive. 

PsAL. xxiv. Domini rti terra. 

The earth is the Lord's, and all that tht^rtMU in : 
the compass of the world, and thoy that «lwfll tlu^rtmi. 

For he hath founded it upon the hcuih : an«l proparod 
it upon the floods. 

Who shall ascend into the hill of tho Lord : or 
who shall Tiae up in hia holy ^Iswi^'t N. 



/ 



96] '9tastxB tax tDe Seolr. 

Even he that hath clean hands, and a pure heart : 
and that hath not lift up his mind unto vanity, nor 
sworn to deceive his neighbour. 

He shall receive the blessing from the Lord : and 
righteousness from the God of his salvation. 

This is the generation of them that seek him : 
even of them that seek thy face, Jacob. 

Lift up your heads, ye gates, and be ye lift up 
ye everlasting doors : and the King of glory shall 
come in. 

Who is the King of glory : it is the Lord strong 
and mighty, even the Lord mighty in battle. 

Lift up your heads, ye gates, and be ye lift up, 
ye everlasting doors : and the King of glory shall 
come in. 

Who is the King of glory : even the Lord of hosts, 
he is the King of glory. 

Glory, &c. 

Ant. He shall receive the blessing from the Lord : 
and righteousness from the God of his salvation. 

{In ChurcL"] 

Let us pray. 
Lord, have mercy. 
Christ, have mercy. 
Lord, have mercy. 
Our Father, &c. 

Almighty God, who out of the mouths of babes 
and sucklings hast ordained strength, and madest 
infants to glorify thee by their deaths ; mortify and 
kill all vices in us, and so strengthen us by thy 
grace, that by the innocency of our lives and con- 
stancy of our faith, even unto death, we may glorify 
thy holy Name, through Jesus Christ our Lord. 
Amen. 

[Afterwards.'} 

Ant, Young men and maidens. 



Vrasfm for t^t JBeadr. [97 

PsAL. cxlviii. Latudate DominunL 

praise the Lord of heaven : praise him in the 
height. 

&c. &c. Vide page 35. 

Glory be to the Father, <fcc. 

Ant. Young men and maidens, old men and 
children, praise the Name of the Lord. 

Lord, have mercy. 
Christ, have mercy. 
Lord, have mercy. 
Our Father, &c. 

^. Suffer little children to come unto me, and 
forbid them not. 
I^. For of such is the kingdom of heaven. 

Let us pray. 

everlasting God, who hast ordained and consti- 
tuted the services of Angels and men in a wonderful 
order, mercifully grant, that as thy holy Angels al- 
ways do thee service in heaven, so by thy appoint- 
ment they may succour and defend us on earth, 
through Jesus Christ our Lord. Amen. 

[Returning from Hhe funeraX of an Infemt, the Song of the Three 
Children may be used.'\ 

Benedidte omnia opera. 

all ye Works of the Lord, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Angels of the Lord, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Heavens, bless ye the Lord : praise him, and 
magnify him for ever. 

ye Waters that be above the Firmament, bless ye 
the Lord ; jpTd^Q him, and msugmiy \im fet «^^\. V. 






98] Vrasers tot t|e WtsHH. 

all ye Powers of the Lord, bless ye the Lord ; 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Sun, and Moon, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Stars of Heaven, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Showers, and Dew, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Winds of God, bless ye the Lord : praise him, 
and magnify him for ever. 

ye Fire and Heat, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Winter and Summer, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Dews, and Frosts, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Frost and Cold, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Ice and Snow, bless ye the Lord : praise him, 
and magnify him for ever. 

ye Nights, and Days, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him and magnify him for ever. 

ye Light and Darkness, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Lightnings, and Clouds, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

let the Earth bless the Lord : yea, let it praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Mountains, and Hills, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

all ye Green Things upon the Earth, bless ye the 
Lord : praise him, and magnify, him for ever. 

ye Wells, bless ye the Lord : praise him, and 
ms^nIify him for ever. 

ye Seas, and Floods, bless y© the Lord : praise' 
Jucm, and magnify him &r ever. 

ye Whales, and all thftt mo^ei Va ^2bft,^^i^^v 



Erasers for tte IPealr. [99 

bless ye the Lord : praise him, and magnify him for 
ever. 

« 

all ye Fowls of the Air, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

all ye Beasts, and Cattle, bless ye the Lord ; 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Children of Men, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

let Israel bless the Lord : praise him, and mag- 
nify him for ever. 

ye Priests of the Lord, bless ye the Lord : praise 
him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Servants of the Lord, bless ye the Lord : 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye Spirits and Souls of the Kighteous, bless ye 
the Lord : praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

ye holy and humble Men of heart, bless ye the 
Lord : praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

Ananias, Azarias, and Misael, bless ye the Lord: 
praise him, and magnify him for ever. 

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son : and to 
the Holy Ghost; 

As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall 
be : world without end. Amen. 



\ 



INTRODUCTION 

TO 

A WEEK'S MEDITATIONS 

ON 

THE FOUR LAST THINGS, 



/ 



" Remember the last end." " Remember my judgment : for 
thine also shall be so ; yesterday for me and to-day for thee." 

EccL. xzxviii. 20, 22. 

Pbayeb for the dead naturally leads us to contem- 
plate our own death, for our thoughts pass readily 
from the departure of others to that of ourselves. 
I " Yesterday for me and to-day for thee." Hence, the 
time that a corpse usually remains unburied is sin- 
gularly calculated for such spiritual improvement as 
it is the object of mental prayer to promote. It 
seemed well, therefore, to subjoin a week's medita- 
tions on the four last things incident to man, viz.. 
Death, Judgment, Heaven, and Hell ; subjects which, 
it is hoped, will be found specially in unison with 
the feelings at such a period, as they are most practi- 
cal at all times. 

The custom of meditation, however, being so little 
in use amongst us, that many are altogether ignorant 
of the method of setting about it, the following short 
rules may be previously considered with advantage. 

The subject of meditation which is to occupy us 
during the time allotted to it, each day, should be 
read over two or three times previously, in order 
to impress the different points on the mind, and to 



/ 



102] itttrolTttctiott to iO^itsAUmfi. 

call into exercise all its powers, viz., the memory, 
the will, and the affections at the time of meditation. 
It is best to prepare the subject over night ; that is, 
to choose it, and to read it over as nearly as possible 
the last thing before going to sleep.; then tp recall it 
the first thing in the morning, and to read it over a 
third time immediately before beginning the actual 
process. The time allowed to it each day must be 
regulated by the strength and habits of the individual, 
and, in general, beginners should attempt much less 
than they may hope to arrive at afterwards ; for such, 
therefore, from a quarter to half an hour will be found 
quite enough. Eventually, none should rest satisfied 
with less than half an hour a day. The best time for 
meditation is in the morning — amongst other reasons, 
the mind is then clearest. Silence is, of course, indis- 
pensable, and solitude a very great help. The best 
posture, after the preparatory prayers, <fcc., is that 
which most disposes the mind to devotion, be it 
kneeling, prostration, standing, or sitting. We must, 
however, carefully avoid whatever is indevout. 

Mental prayer, under which name the whole exer- 
cise of meditation is contained, consists in three 
parts. To begin with the Preparation : this is made 
up of three mental acts. 1. An act of faith in the 
presence of God, such as, My God, I believe Thee 
present within me, and I worship Thee from my in- 
most soul ! 2. An act of humility, as, Lord, 
I ought already to be in Hell on account of my sins. 
I am very sorry that I have ever offended Thee. 
Have mercy. Lord, on me. 3. A prayer for light. 
Holy Father, grant me light that I may draw fruit 
from this meditation, for the sake of Jesus Christ. 
With this end say the Lord's Prayer. It is well to 
make these preparatory acts or prayers short but 
fervent, and, if possible, kneeling near the place 
chosen for meditation. 



Introlmrtum to Aftelrttattoits. [103 

N-ext we come to the Meditation itself which has 
two or three preludes, and three or even four points 
for consideration. The £b*st prelude is historical^ and 
therefore chiefly needed when the subject for medita- 
tion is some incident in the narrative of the Gospels, 
(kc. In the meditations which follow it is always 
omitted. The second prelude is local : that is, it re- 
quires us to draw a picture in the mind of some 
actually existing or supposable scene, in a real place. 
For example, of the death-bed of a sick person — of 
heaven, or of the last Judgment — or in meditating 
on our Lord's life, of some one of the many scenes 
described in the Gospel. The advantage of this pic- 
ture is, that it fixes the mind to the particular spot, 
so that the imagination cannot wander, or, should it 
after all wander, supplies a point to which it may be 
at once recalled. Care, however, must be taken not 
needlessly to fatigue the mind with this prelude, or 
indeed with any other preliminary in the imder- 
taking, for they are after all only means to an end, 
and different persons wiU find different degrees of 
assistance from them according to their disposition 
and temperament. On the other hand, they should 
never be entirely omitted. For, though the rules 
may seem many and tiresome at first, they will be 
very quickly acquired, and, when once learnt, will 
be practised with ease and advantage. The third 
prelude, i.e,, the second of the following meditations, 
is a prayer for some particular grace relative to the 
annexed meditation, as in that " on the means of 
preparing for death," for the grace of holy dying, 
" let me die the death of the righteous, and let my 
last end be like his," &c. 

In meditating on the points after reading them, 
reflect chiefly on that point by which you feel .your 
devotion most excited. But reinember that the 
chief advantage you are to derive from meditation 



/ 



104] Inttol^uctton to fiuaitstima, 

consists in three things. 1. Pious affections. 2. 
Fervent petitions to God for all the graces necessary to 
salvation, 3. Firm resolutions to perform some parti- 
cular acts of virtue, or to avoid some particular defect 

Pious affections are inward acts of £uth, or hope, 
or love, or sorrow, such as, Lord I believe in 
Thee. I believe that Thou camest down from the 
bosom of the Father, and didst become flesh in the 
womb of the Blessed Virgin for the sake of me a most 
unworthy sinner. I hope and trust in Thee, in 
Thee only, notwithstanding all my sins, for Thou art 
my only Saviour. I desire to love Jhee with all the 
affection of my heart for the immeasurable benefits 
Thou hast conferred upon me. Alas 1 Lord, I am 
very sorry that I have offended Thee, that I have so 
wickedly crucified Thee afresh with my sins, for 
which I do here acknowledge that I deserve now to 
be in hell. But have mercy, Lord, on me. Hence- 
forth, I offer myself wholly to Thy service, and I 
desire to feel the same love for Thee that the holy 
angels feel —nay, to love Thee infinitely. 

Fervent petitions are of the greatest importance in 
meditation, because, of all kinds of prayer, petition is 
most needfiil. Divines say that petition for the 
graces necessary to salvation is as generally necessary 
to an adult, that he may enter into the kingdom of 
heaven, as baptism is to an infiint. And Gk)d has 
bound Himself absolutely to grant them ''What 
things soever ye desire when ye pray, believe that ye 
receive them, and ye shall receive thenu^^ We 
ought, therefore, to ask for all the graces needful for 
us, as well as those especially suggested by our 
reflections, and, at all times, for these three graces in 
particular; firat, for the pardon of our past sins, 
secondly, for the gift of charity,* i,e^ the love of God, 
or strength to keep all his commandments, thirdly, 

>Markxi.24. *\eoT.xa\. 



Introlmrttoit to fSU^iiMioM. [i05 

for the gift of final perseyerance, and that we may 
for no pains of death fall from God.* 

Firm resolutions should also be made in our me- 
ditations to do some good acts or avoid some particu- 
lar defects, and, if we would have these effectual, we 
must ask God*s blessing on them, grace in making 
and strength in keeping them. 

The conclusion of the meditation is a colloquy or 
prayer to God, suggested by the preceding reflections. 
This should be made in the words — or even without 
any distinct words — in the thoughts which offer 
themselves to us at the moment. It will be found 
best to address ourselves at such a time to our Lord 
and to beg His intercession with the Father, regard- 
ing Him as Man, as our mediator, our friend, and re- 
deemer. We should then 1st, return thanks for the 
lights we have received during the meditation ; 
2ndly, recall briefly our resolutions ; 3rdly, pray to 
the Eternal Father through the merits of Jesus Christ, 
to enable us to be faithftil to them. 

The last act is to recommend the souls of the 
faithfril departed, all sinners here on earth, and the 
whole Church to God, and to say the Lord's Prayer 
with this object. 

In rising up to go* we should call to mind some 
devotional thought which has much impressed us, 
to be remembered from time to time throughout the 
day, as a sort of holy flower gathered in the garden 
of heavenly aspirations. 

For the convenience of those who may tviah to use the forcgonng 
rules, the heads of each are as/oUows : 

The general preliminaries, choosing the subject, and reading over 
the M&iiiation as often as needful, are supposed to be already done. 
Then, kneeling near the spot chosen for de purpose of meditation, 
enter first upon the PreparaHon. 

' The last verse, 2 Cor. ziiL, may be regarded as containing . 
these three petitions. ^ S. FtaaQ£,\&Ql^ft!t&^. >v 

L A^ - 



106] Introlmcttoit to ^el^ttattons. 

I. Pbeparation ; which contains, 

1. An Act of Faith, " My God, I believe Thee 
present within me, and I worship Thee from 
my inmost soul." 

2. An Act of Humility, " Lord, I ought al- 
ready to be in hell on account of my sins. 
I am sorry that I have ever offended Thee* 
Have mercy, Lord, on me.'* 

3. Prayer for Light, "Holy Father, grant me 
light, that I may draw fruit from this medi- 
tation." 

Then say "" The Lord's Prayer,^'* with this end in vieto. 
Having placed yoursdfin the right place and posture, begin 

II. Meditation. 

Prelude 1. The history of the subject. 

2. The picture of the place. 

3. Petition for particular grace. 

Point i. Point ii. Point iii. 

During each of which raise your mind to 

1. Pious Affections, especially i. Acts of sorrow for 
past sin j ii. Acts of resignation ; and iii. Acts 
of love. 

2. Fervent Petitions for all graces necessary to 
salvation, and chiefly for i. Pardon for past sin; 
ii. The gift of charity ; iii. The gift of final 
perseverance. 

3. Firm Resolutions. 

Conclude with " The Colloquy^'* or prayer to our Lord^ suggested 

by the Meditation, 

III. Conclusion ; in which, 

1. Return thanks for the lights given in meditation. 

2. Recall to mind good resolutions. 

3. Pray to fulfil them. 

Recommend the sotds of the Faithful Departed and all the ChurtA to 
God. With this end say " The Lord's Prayer:' 

Jiising. to depart^ recollect o devotional tlumght for <l» d«a. 



MEDITATION I. 
en I9eat)i. 

% 

** It is {^pointed unto men once to die/* — Hebrews iz. 27. 



L 



Prelude I. Picture yourself on your death-bed, 
given over, and expecting instantly to depart. 

Prelude II. Seek grace of God in the words of 
the holy Psalmist, " Consider and hear me, Lord 
my Gk)d; lighten mine eyes that I sleep not in 
death." 

The first point for consideration, — What is death ? 
The sundering of body and soul ; the passing away 
of the spirit from its earthly tabernacle ; and the 
breaking up of all those ties which have hitherto, 
since birth, subsisted between them. It is the 
severing of ourselves from everything which we have 
known through the senses. Our eyes shall no more 
see. Our ears shall no more hear. No more shall 
scents please or displease our nostrils. We shall 
never taste the bitter or the sweet as before again. 
We shall not know whether anything touches us or 
not, as heretofore, any more again for ever. That 
whole system of visible and sensible things in which 
we have lived, that great source of pleasure and pain, 
of joy and sorrow, of weal and woe, which has been 
our very atmosphere, becomes by death nothing to 
us, and we nothing to it except in the way of remem- 
brance ! 1. No more henceforth shall you behold 
the sunrise or the sunset ; no more feel the changing ■ 
seasons, the joyous spring, the genial summer, the 
fruitful autumn, and the hospitable winter ; no more 
greet those you love, no moi^ taka ^jcl xv^rxa^^ 



108] M^iiaAiM i. 



/ 



as now, in any of the affairs of the world. 2. Every 
one also must be left. Mends, relations, acquaintance, 
dependants ; and eyerything, house and home, lands 
and goods, property, great or small ; all, all are to be 
left at once and for ever ! We may, indeed we 
must, meet again, but then how changed ! How 
different shall we be, and how widely different our 
circumstances! 3. "Vanity of vanities... all is 
vanity." " As he came forth of his mother's womb, 
naked shall he return to go as he came, and shall 
take nothing of his labour, which he may take away 
in his hand."* 

Second point for consideration, — What shall be- 
come of this body ? 1. Imagine that you behold 
a person who has just expired. His body still lies 
on the bed in the posture in which he breathed his 
last ; his head is sunk upon the chest ; his hair in 
disorder, bathed in the last perspiration; his eyes 
fixed and unmeaning; his cheeks hollow; his Hps 
parted and pale ; his whole face of the colour of 
ashes ; his hands clutch the bed clothes, and the 
whole body is still, cold, and lifeless. As we continue 
to gaze, sometimes he seems to sigh, as just before 
death, and his limbs again to move convulsively. 
But no; it is all illusion. There is no power of 
motion ; nothing there but the body of death ; " The 
silver cord is loosed... the golden bowl is broken... the 
pitcher is broken at the fountain... the wheel is 
broken at the cistern." 

2. Look again at that body. A few days have 
passed since he died, and already an offensive smell is 
exhaled. " Dust thou art, and unto dust thou shalt 
return." The original sentence is beginning to be 
executed. The windows must be opened, lime-water 
and other preventives of evil stench, must be brought 



/. 



H^ iBeotl. [109 

into the room. He must be hastily placed in his 
last home. He is at once dressed in his shroud^ and 
laid in the coffin. His friends and relations must 
take their last look at those features which they shall 
never behold again. See, how they come whispering 
into the room, hastily say a few prayers, look once, 
and retire. The mourners crowd about the house and 
tears stand in the eyes of all. " The keepers of the 
house tremble... those that look out of the window 
shall be darkened... and desire shall fail." See how 
the long funeral is leaving the house, hear the sobs of 
its attendants, look at the black, nodding plumes on 
the dark hearse and upon the horses' heads. Hark ! 
the bell sounds " because man goeth to his long home 
and the mourners go about the streets." " The dust 
shall return to the earth as it was." 

3. The service is over, the grave is filled, the sur- 
vivors have returned. Time passes on rapidly ; and 
now what has happened to the body ? First, could 
you have seen it, it turned yellow, then black ; then 
the whole was covered with a white mould ; a putrid 
liquid flows from it, from which crowds of worms are 
bred. The flesh is consumed from the face ; the 
hair Mis off"; the eyes are eaten out. The worms 
first devour the flesh, and then one another. At 
length nothing remains but a bare skeleton, which 
in time falls to pieces, the skull in one place, the 
arms and legs in another, the back and ribs in ano- 
ther. Nay, at last they too become dust : " As the 
chaff which is driven with the whirlwind out of the 
floor." 5 

Third point for consideration, — Apply these con» 
siderations to yourself. How soon will all this happen 
to you ! you yourself be lying on a bed gasping and 
struggling for breath. At length, able to endure no 

* Hob. xiii. 



110] M^iiatitm i. 



longer, and with one last long breath obliged to yield 
up your spirit. Those who stand around will say, 
" It is all over." Then they will lay you out, and 
place you in your coffin, and carry you to your grave. 
Oh ! how soon, how very soon will this be actually 
so ! Then men will discuss your character and your 
actions, some indeed more tenderly, but many in 
carelessness, self-interest, or contempt ! 

Perhaps they who loved you will not bear at first 
to hear your name mentioned, yet even they will at 
length get used to it, and then you will be remem- 
bered as a thing that is altogether past ; or even at 
last this memoiy is totally obliterated, as one whose 
" memorial is perished with" him, and you might say 
of yourself, " I am clean forgotten...! am become, like 

a broken vesseL" Thus some say, " Ah ! so is 

dead! ...Poor — — is dead at lastl where did he diel 
...What was his complaint ?... Has he provided well 
for his family?... he was a very rich man. ..He was. of 
great advantage to me." Or others, " It is a most; 
happy release, and I hope so and so will now be com- 
fortable. All is for the best. They that die miake 
way for the living, and it is useless to ^eep since, you 
cannot bring him back by tears." Then some are 
troubled for a little space thinking how near death 
may be to themselves, but soon they forget it again. 
They enter upon and occupy the property of the de- 
ceased, and that soon consoles them for his death. 
Thus as you have acted on the death of others, shall 
others act on occasion of . your death. "And thus," 
says one, "in a short time your death shall be rather 
a source of joy ; and in the very room in which you 
shall have breathed forth your soul, and in which- 
you shall be judged by Jesus Christ, others shall 
dance, and eat, and play, and laugh as before. And- 
where shall your soul theu be ?" 
Converse with youraetf on t\i<eae ^^ti^^. ^^^5^\ '^ 



I 



en gftttt. [111 

is a fearful thing to fall into the hands of the living 
Gfod." Therefore make most earnest prayer to Him 
who was crucified for you — 

Oh, on that day, that tearful day. 
Be thou the trembling sinner^s stay. 
And spare him, Qod, we humbly pray ! 



MEDITATION 11. 
i&n Vteyoratton tot JBtafi. 

** Prepare to meet thy God." — Amos iv. 12. 



Prelude I. Picture to yourself a man on his bed 
struggling with disease and death ; dreading the re- 
cords of his own conscience^ while Satan tempts him 
to despair. 

Prelude II. Seek grace so to understand his dread 
that you may be ever ready for that hour when it 
comes to you. 

The first point. The first thing necessary for a 
religious preparation for death is, seriotLS foreikought 
— serious anxiety about what end you are coming to 
perhaps this very night. The day and hour of your 
death is determined upon in the counsels of Almighty 
Gtod. He keeps it secret from you that you may be 
always ready. He says to you Himself, "Be ye 
therefore ready^ Now if He should say to you, 
"This night thy soul shall be required of thee;" 
then whose shall that soul be, God's or Satan's 1 is it 
fit for heaven or belli are you living each day in 
expectation that it may be your last ? Do you build 
upon the . hopes of future, perhaps even, a deathbed 
repentance ? Then ; 

1. Consider the daily chances of a sudden death 
taking you unawares — say, you are travelling and an 



'fF^' 



112] mmtatm 11. 



accident be&Us you — ^you are walking out and are 
run over — a latent disease in your system arrives 
suddenly at its height — a violent fever comes on like 
a mere cold, you get worse, in a few hours you are 
delirious, in a day or two you are dead — in a word, 
could you see it, you are like the man who being in- 
vited to dine with a certain king of Sicily looked up 
and saw a sword suspended over his head by a slender 
thread. The fear lest the thread should break and 
put an end to his life took away his appetite for the 
dainties set before him. So ought you to fear the 
sword of death ever hanging over, and sure sooner or 
later to fall upon you. 

2. Consider the fearful odds against a deathbed 
repentance being complete, even if it should be 
granted you ; your body perhaps wracked with pain 
so that you cannot think of the health of your soul 
though you wish it ; your mind benumbed in aU its 
faculties, overpowered with the number and hardness 
of the things it has to do in so short a time. Tour 
friends unwilling to disturb you. Your conduct now 
for the first time seen in its true light. Before you 
the grave full of worms and corruption — around you 
evil spirits striving with all their might to gain pos- 
session of you — above an angry Judge — beneath, 
Hell yawning for your soul. It is nothing short of a 
great miracle if you should so repent at such an hour 
as to be accepted ; and when your whole life is given 
you for preparation, will you trust to this broken 
reedl How small a thing distracts you now from 
serious thoughts ! a little bodily pain, slight mental 
uneasiness, a trifling excitement. How will you 
then suddenly learn to love God above all things, 
when '*the sorrows of death encompass thee... the 
snares of death overtake theeT^ 



• Psm. xvm. ^, 4. 



<S)n preparation tor I9eat(. [113 

The second point, — Let the next thing be an 
earnest inquiry into your manner of life. Life is the 
season of grace, and it. is the season of action, but 
with death all ends ; then it is neither the season of 
action nor the season of grace. Life is the season of 
action ; therefore, as Solomon exhorts you, " Whatso- 
ever thy hand findeth to do, do it with thy might," 
(and what should it find to do of any import- 
ance to be compared with the work of your own 
salyation?) "for there is no work, nor device, nor 
knowledge, nor wisdom, in the grave, whither thou 
goest."7 At present the choice of going to heaven or 
! to hell lies with you ; it is in your own hand to be 
saved or lost ; but when once death comes, " Where 
the tree felleth, there it shall be."^ Life is the 
season of grace too. St. Peter tells us that now God 
is "long-suffering to us-ward, not willing that any 
should perish, but that all should come to repent- 
ance."9 And St. Paul, that "God our Saviour... will 
haye all men to be saved, and to come unto the know- 
ledge of the truth." 1 And St. John, that " If any man 
sin, we have an advocate with the Father." ^ Now God 
in a manner beseeches you to be reconciled unto Him by 
the precious blood of His dear Son, which He would 
not have shed in vain. Wherefore, man, whosoever 
thou art, thou art inexcusable if thou goest on still 
in sin, trusting to an uncertain future ; if thou givest 
to the world, the flesh, or the devil, the best years of 
thy life in the vain hope of offering its dregs to Al- 
mighty God. Thus doing, " Thou despisest the riches 
of His goodness, and forbearance, and long suffering ; 
not knovring that the goodness of God leadeth thee 
to repentance. But after thy hardness and impeni- 
tent heart treasurest up unto thyself vrrath against the 

7 Ecc. ix. 10. « Ecc. xi. 3. » 2 Pet. iii. 9. 

1 1 Tim. ii. 4. « 1 John ii. 1. 



114] |Bel»itati0n H. 



day of wrath and revelation of the righteous judg- 
ment of God ; who will render to every man accord- 
ing to his deeds."* What then are thy deeds ? Are 
you, " by patient continuance in well doing, seeking 
for glory, and honour, and immortaUty T or axe you 
putting off from day to day 1 Alas, to-day is the only 
time you can reckon upon, the only time you can call 
your own. " To-day if ye will hear His voice, harden 
not your heart:"* and, "The night cometh when 
none can work." K you are not fit to die when 
death comes, it will be too late then to seek the Lord, 
too late to knock at the door of His mercy, for then 
it will be the time of justice and vengeance. If, 
when death comes, you are in the state of grace, oh 
what joy, what inconceivable happiness ! henceforth, 
you never can be lost. But if you are out of God's 
favour, what woe, what despair ! You never can be 
in God's favour again to all eternity. Ask yourself 
again, then, what sort of life you are leading ; is it 
such as to make you the fit companion of saints and 
angels, and of our Lord Jesus Christ 1 

The third point — Resolve henceforth to live each day 
in expectation of death. If a man have a comfortable 
income, but no capital, he insures his life, saying, 
I know not when I may die, and, perchance, leave my 
family unprovided for. Delay not for a single day to 
ensure your soul. If you have a deed to execute, 
lawyers will advise you to take every precaution 
against being surprised by death ; " because," say 
they, " the issues of life and death are so very uncer- 
tain." They are so. But what then % It behoves 
you to make as sure as you can in a matter of uncer- 
tain and perishable riches; how much — how infr 
nitely more in the matter of certain and imperishable 
riches ! Here you will run no risk about a little 



/ 



* Romans ii. 4-6. * P«nv. xw. 7, 8. 



0n preparation tor Btax^. [115 



monej^ which must be unsafe after all, and which, if 
lost, may be repaired ; delay not, then, I beseech you, 
to secure that incalcidable treasure which never can 
be taken away from you, and which, if you once miss 
it, never can be repaired for all eternity ! You may 
Uto ten, twenty, thirty years longer, or even a few 
more, though the chances are much against it : at the 
end of that time you rmist die ; and you may die this 
year, this month, this week, this day. "Make no 
tarrying therefore to turn to the Lord, and put not 
oflf from day to day." " Be not without fear to add 
Bin to sin."* Every day you defer repentance, it has 
grown less probable that you ever will repent ; every 
day the final sentence is more likely to be executed, 
"Cut it down, why cumbereth it the ground?" 
Then death once comes you never can repent, though 
you will then wish you could. Oh ! how much 
would you then give for another year, month, or day ! 
But, "Justly," says St. Augustine, " shall he who would 
not repent when he could, be unable to repent when 
he would.*' Now, all things invite you to turn unto 
Gk)d ; but then, if you defer it, you will be amongst 
those who are saying, "We fools,... we have erred 
from the way of truth... we wearied ourselves in the 
way of... destruction." Alas ! for that fatal mistake 
there shall be no cure — no remedy for ever I 

Suffer thyself no longer then to be the dupe of 
Satan, saying to thyself, as perchance thou dost, "His 
mercy is great ; He will be pacified for the multitude 
of my sins;"^ for "wrath" as well as "mercy," 
Cometh from Him ; therefore, " Awake thou that 
sleepest, and arise from the dead, and Christ shall 
give thee light." 7 

» Ecdus. V. 7. 5. « Ecdus. y. 6. ^ Eph. y. 14. 



i 



/ 



MEDITATION III. 
iBn tit means of preparing for Beat 

" Thus saith the Lord, Set thine house in order : fc 
die, and not live.^* Isaiah i 

Prelude I. Draw a picture to yourself 
and devout man in his last moments ; 
weaned from the love of the things of this \ 
therefore resigned to go ; his soul inflamec 
love of God, and desiring to be with Him ; 
of holy writ suggesting themselves to his tb 
though wafted from heaven itself : " Blessc 
dead which die in the Lord ; yea, saith the 
they rest from their labours." 

Prelude II. Seek the grace of holy d 
utter fervently the prayer of the prophet, 
die the death of the righteous, and let m 
be like his." 

First point — Death must come to all once 
once. If, then, you would die well, you d 
your lesson well beforehand, for, if you fai 
time, you shall never come back to try it 
repair the former errors. You can die ( 
whether you die ill or whether you die w< 
foolish, then, — nay, how plainly mad, must 
never thinks about the part he has to pe 
the moment has arrived on which all for a! 
depends ! What musician ever failed to re 
part before the solemn performance ? W 
ever succeeded in pleasing his audience i 
imagined that audience in his private mc 
forehand ? What sort of a general would ] 
deferred drilling and reviewing his troops t: 
of the day of battle 1 'Would ^ou Ti<i\. ^' 



L 



<!^n tte MtSLM of preparing tor HBeatf). [117 

man a fool % Yet they are but earthly crowns which 
are staked on such battles ; on the issue of our last 
contest with our great spiritual enemy, a crown ever- 
lasting in the heavens depends. True, you will call 
upon God when you feel death to be at hand, " When 
your fear cometh as desolation;... when distress and 
anguish cometh upon you."^ But what saith the 
Wisdom of God 1 " Then shall they call upon me, 
but I will not answer ; they shall seek me early, but 
they shall not find me." The terrors of death being 
before their eyes, and the dread of hell-fire now at 
once to be encountered, it is not wonderful if the 
worst of sinners should call upon God — out of fear, 
but not out of true contrition. And is it not to these 
Gk)d says, "Because I have called all your lifetime 
and ye refused ..I also will laugh at your calamity ; 
I will mock when your fear cometh," i, e. on your 
deathbed. 

Of what avail will it be to listen to a few prayers, 
and utter once or twice " Amen 1 " To what purpose 
will you repeat the Creed, and receive the blessed 
Sacrament when it is too late to learn the hatred of 
sin, and the love of God above all things ? How can 
you in a moment turn from loving the pleasures of 
sin to hating them ; and how shall he whose heart 
has been hitherto set on worldly objects, renounce 
them in an instant to love God better than all 1 

It was a sad case for those virgins who had no oil 
when the cry was heard, "Behold the Bridegroom 
cometh, go ye out to meet Him." They that were 
ready went in with him to the marriage -feast, but 
the rest knocked when it was too late. So will you 
find, that, unless you have made preparation before- 
hand, it is too late, except by a miracle, (" for with 
God all things are possible") to do so at the last. 

• Prov. i. 27. 



118] HftelrttaKon iii. 



The second point, — Begin at once to take measures 
that you may never be surprised and cut off unawares, 
considering the anguish you would then feel at your 
insane delays, and opportunities so often lost As 
early as possible after this meditation take the follow- 
ing steps. First, on your knees before God resolve to 
bring forth works meet for repentance in sorrow for 
the past, and a regular life for the future, and pray 
Him to give you strength and guidance in the fulfil- 
ment of your resolve. Consider the ten command- 
ments, and try your own behaviour, especially in 
your youth, by each of them in its Gospel strictness. 
Call to mind all your known failings, and beg God 
to reveal to you your secret faults likewise. Beflect 
upon your mode of fulfilling now and in past time 
the duties of your calling and station. Write down 
all the sins you can remember in your whole life to 
have committed, all the sinful habits of. thought, 
word, and deed you have indulged in, your neglect o^ 
or culpableness in, private prayers, — your irregularity 
or indevotion in attending public worship ; seek out 
some " discreet and learned minister," 9 and to him in 
God's stead make the general confession of your past 
life which you have so prepared. Nothing will con- 
tribute more to your eventual preparation for eter- 
nity than this general confession; and if it appears 
hard now, it is very likely to be impossible at the 
hour of death. Next, go on to root out every sinful 
affection of your heart. Oppose sensuality with 
abstinence and discipline afflictive to the body; 
conquer pride with humiliation, — root out envy, ran- 
cour, and every vindictive feeling, practising charity 
to the poor, and obliging behaviour to all men. Be 



/ 



^ It is obvious that in many cases this advice cannoi be com- 
plied with at all under the existing state of things. At the least, 
the preparation may be made, and a resolution taken as to the 
rest when it shall please God to grasvt an oYeraNssmJcs. 



a^n tit Mtam of preparing tor Beat^. [119 



L 



silent on the &ults of others ; where you have done 
an injury, make all the amends in your power ; at 
the least, heg pardon of those you have offended. 
Resolve for the future to fly all occasions of tempta- 
tion — especially of your prevailing temptations. 
Settle your accounts with your neighbours as well 
as with God, as far as lies in you. Dispose of 
your property by will if you have any, remem- 
bering while you do so, that, in the eyes of the 
law, this will be your last action — ^your last deed, 
your last will and testament, and that it will be put 
in execution, when, according to the justice and piety 
of your disposition, your torments or your happiness 
will be increased proportionably. For all the rest of 
your life resolve most solemnly on some such rules as 
the following : — 1. To spend some portion of every day 
in devotion — at the least say your morning and even- 
ing prayers ; in the evening, or some other set time 
during the twenty-four hours, examining your conduct 
during the past day, and trying to feel real grief for 
all transgressions and omissions — in the morning 
dedicating your day to God, and praying against 
your most dangerous temptations. 2. To read some 
short passage from the four Gospels each day, and 
think upon it, trying to fix it in your memory and 
in your heart. 3, To attend on Sundays both ser- 
vices at church ; to avoid all employments unsuitable 
to the day, and when not otherwise engaged, to spend 
your time in reading good books. 4. To attend daily 
prayers at church, morning or evening, or both if you 
are able. 5. To keep your Fridays with some in- 
crease of devotional reading and abstinence. 6. To 
receive the Holy Communion at least every month, 
and to continue if possible^ the habit of confession 

' It is not meant that tliis habit will be potrible for the moit 
part 



120] mt^iiaXion Hi. 



/ 



jou have begun, as frequently as you communicate. 
7. To pay attention to the fasts and festivals which 
our Church ordains. 8. To visit and relieve sick 
and distressed persons, if you are in circumstances 
to do so. 9. To make a habit of saying short prayers, 
and of commending yourself in secret to God, espe- 
cially when tempted. Then, as to the past, place all 
your trust in the Atonement of Jesus Christ; you 
must indeed fear so as never to cease to pray for 
pardon, but with all you may have a good and com- 
fortable hope in that Blood which cleanseth away all 
sin, and has obtained grace for you thus far. 

The third point. — But, to be truly prepared for 
death, we must seek yet further to set our house in 
order ; we mvst wean our hearts from all earMy things; 
we must detach them from all our possessions, and 
separate them from all, even the lawful affections of 
this world. For at death they must all be rent 
asunder, and how painful and dangerous will that 
shock be, if we have not done it of our own will b^ 
forehand, or at the least prepared ourselves for it! 
Meditate often, then, on the four last things>^well 
upon death — imagine yourself to be at the point or 
death, and make a surrender to God mentally of all 
you love best on earth, saying, " I am ready, Lord, 
to give up all at Thy command. Thy Will he done/* 

Picture to yourself the terrors of judgment. 
Think of the torments of hell. Consider the glories 
of heaven. If you are attached to any person or any 
thing upon earth, say to yourself often, I must one 
day, perhaps very soon — God only knows how soon, 
take leave of this person or this thing. Am I ready 
to resign them 1 

If you have any favourite scheme or plan for the 

future, ask yourself, Can I at a moment's notice give 

up my scheme or my plan 1 Bealise to yourself the 

sundering which shall take "^lacft «A> ^wa ^^»^(k \«j- 



a^n Jfutrgment [121 



tween you and your children, your wife, your hus- 
band, your dearest friends — the breaking off of all 
your ties — the snapping of all your plans, and make 
up your mind to it as to an inevitable certainty; 
often picture yourself on your own deathbed, and go 
through the scene in your mind. Thus it will not be 
80 startling when it comes. Also, keep the counsels 
of Eccle8iasticus,and in all you set about, "Whatsoever 
thou takest in hand remember the end, and thou 
shalt never do amiss."^ Finally, spend every day as 
if it were your last ; perform thus every action, every 
exercise of devotion and charity, and let every con- 
fession and conversation be made in the same spirit. 
'^ Blessed are those servants, whom the Lord when he 
Cometh shall find watching : verily I say unto you, 
that He shall gird Himself, and make them to sit down 
to meat, and will come forth and serve them."* No 
suddenness of death shall surprise them, for '* if He 
shall come in the second watch, or come in the third 
watch, and find them so, blessed are those servants,^** 

Seek the grace of holy dying, and utter fervently 
the prayer of the prophet, " Let me die the death of 
the righteous, and let my last end be like his." 



L 



MEDITATION IV. 
i^ Jttlrgmeiit. 

*^ It is appointed unto men once to die, but after this the 
judgment."— Her ix. 27. 

Prelude I. Picture yourself dead — entered into 
the world of departed spirits — ^placed between two 
angels, the one good and the other bad — and bound. 

• EccluB, yii. 86. ' Luke xii. 87. * I^kaxcu^. 



122] m^itation IV, 



/ 



Preludk n. Beseech our Lord to give you a 
wholesome fear of His judgment, and to enable you 
to say with the holy psalmist, " My flesh trembleth 
for fear of Thee : and I am afraid of Thy Judg- 
ments." 

First point. — The meeting with God, Consider 
that the instant the last sigh is heaved and the 
breath gone from the body, the soul shuts its eyes in 
that selfsame moment to all the world, all its aflairs 
of little or great importance, its interests, ties, and 
connections, and lo ! a new and strange scene is 
opened to it. It is in the land of Spirits, the eyes of 
the mind are opened, and tremendous sights at once 
presented to them. On the one side forms of awfiil 
grandeur, of dazzling and surprising brilliancy, 
beyond all conception — God surrounded by His holy 
angels ; on the other, foul and loathsome monsters, 
disgustingly hideous, and most oflensive to all its 
faculties or powers of perception in the Satanic crew. 
To one or other of these most opposite companies it 
must be at once and for ever joined. To which does 
it belong] How awful will be the impression at 
that moment stamped upon the departed spirit, of 
the infinite attributes of God ! Like the mighty 
billows of the ocean beating over us,* so will come 
the realization of His dreadful majesty over the soul 
in that hour. His Almighty power. His omnis- 
cient wisdom. His indefeasible goodness, hitherto un- 
thought of, almost as bad as unbelieved, are now 
suddenly forced with all the terrors of reality upon 
the mind. His countenance severe and implacable ; 
just but unchangeable, as of one who will render to 
every man according to his deeds. What appeal is 
there from Him who was, and is, and ever will be the 
Most High % What escape from Him who is every- 



• See Job xxxi. 2a,\\iiga.\fe MwosSkaJaaTi* 



r 



^n JfuUgmnit. [123 



L 



where? "Whither shall I go. from Thy Spirit, or 
whither shall I flee from Thy presence V Now, only 
consider the terror of encountering the angry counte- 
nance of a man who thinks himself justly offended, and 
how thb is increased if our own conscience be against 
OS. But suppose, withal, the offended person is a su- 
perior — ^nay, even a father or a king, how does this 
I aggravate the fear of meeting his indignant eye 1 
But here it is no man, no human master, no earthly 
parent, but God Himself — our Lord Jesus Christ—- 
before whom, in His glorified state, even the beloved 
disciple fell at His feet as dead.^ 

Truly, we may well suppose, as holy men have said, 
that the terrors of that sight will outdo the torments 
of hell fire ; for, how despairingly shall men " look on 
Him whom they pierced," not once only, as the Jews, 
but again and again with their sins, a« unworthy 
Christians. Oh ! let us then appease Him while we 
may; for when that hour is come, there will be no 
room for repentance, no use in tears, no time for 
conversion. 

King, of dread-inspiring face, . . . 
Thou righteous Judge that dost repay, 
Oh ! grant me pardon whilst I may. 
Before that dreadful reckling day. 

Second point. — BtU, behold I now " the Judgment 
18 set, and the hooks are opened*^* Two books are 
brought forth, "The Gospel," and "Conscience." 
From the gospel is read the Christian's rule of life; 
from the book of conscience our sad shortcomings. 
In the gospel what we should have done — in con* 
science what we have done. Two accusers stand 
forth, a good and a bad angel : He who should have 
been our guardian and our guide, and he was our 
tempter, and whom we would follow— nay, rather fore^ 

« Rev. i. 17. 



124] ^el><tati0n IV, 



I 



stal in his suggestions. Now must be given the 
whole details of our misspent lives ! Everything which 
seems most trivial to us now shall then be told and 
set, ah ! in how and different a light ! even every idle 
word shall then be told against us — how much more 
a wanton or loose expression, a malicious or envious 
tale ! Christian, man or woman, young or old, 
rich or poor, high or low ; religious, priest, give 
an account of thy stewardship, render an exact 
account of the graces thou hast received, and, per- 
chance, neglected or abused ; give an account of the 
spending of thy money and thy time — of the use 
thou hast made of all thy faculties — of the opportu- 
nities of communion thou hast neglected or misused — 
of the occasions of doing good to others thou hast let 
slip — ah ! how much more of thy more glaring sins ! 
" It shall come to pass at that time, that I will search 
Jerusalem with candles, and punish" 7... how much 
more Babylon ! 

How many deeds you trust in now shall then 
seem "reprobate silver... because the Lord hath re- 
jected them !"® How many sins you take no ac- 
count of now, shall then become frightfully promi- 
nent ! How many which you reckon trifles now, 
shall then seem grievous offences ! How many you 
had forgotten shall then rise up again, unrepented 
and unforgiven ! Then will Satan begin his accusa- 
tion to the Judge. " They were Thine by creation, 
but mine they are by their own choice. Thou didst 
redeem them with Thy most precious blood, but they 
sold themselves to me for a low pleasure, for a mean 
interest, to gratify a bad passion, or a degrading am- 
bition. I never suffered stripes nor scourges, nor 
mocking, nor scorn, nor spitting for them. I never 
hanged upon a cross for ^em, nor dwelt thirty-three 

f Zeph. i. 12. * 3eT.TL, ^^. (^ 



H^n SMlsqmtnt [125 



years on earth, in the form of a servant, for their 
sakes ; yet, being made Thine by the price of Thy 
crucifixion, they made themselves mine by crucifying 
Thee afresh ; and when Thou hadst clad their souls in 
robes of baptismal purity, they willingly sufiered us 
to strip them naked to their shame, and they thought 
themselves secure, and went dancing to their grave 
like a drunkard to a fight, or a fiy into a candle ; 
and therefore they that did partake with us in our 
faults, must divide with us in our portion and fearful 
interest." 9 

Third point, — Finally, the Judge shall pass sen^ 
tence. Think how those words would sound in your 
ears, " Depart from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, 
prepared for the devil and his angels.'* most 
awful thunderclap to the sinner 1 How gladly would 
he then call on the hills to fall upon him, and the 
earth to cover him ! nay, would he not even die again 
if he might 1 Behold, he will exclaim to himself, 
the end of my foolish life, of my fruitless resolutions, 
of my disregarded upbraidings of conscience, of my 
living for the life which then was, instead of that 
which was to come ! What have I now but an eter- 
nity of wretchedness, and no appeal, no escape, no 
alleviation, but " the worm which dieth not, and the 
fire which is not quenched." On the other hand, 
how incredibly joyful will those words sound, "Well 
done, good and faithful servant; thou hast been faith- 
ful... enter thou into the joy of thy Lord." 

Undoubtedly you will hear one or other of these 
words — ^you yourself, even you. Now you may 
choose which you will. " This day" you may " choose 
whom ye will serve." ^ The choice of your eternal 
lot rests with you. Would you receive the former 
dreadful sentence, it is very easy, for " broad is the 



/ 



• Bishop Taylor's Advent to Judgment. ' Jos. xxiv, 1 5, 



126] |Bel><tatton V. 



way and wide is the gate and many there be that go 
in thereat." Would you escape that, and obtain the 
latter — 1st Bring forth works meet for repentance. 
2ndly. Strive to enter in at the strait gate — strive 
for " few there be that find it." 3rdly. When thou 
hast found it, strive to enter it, walking "in holi- 
ness and righteousness all the days of thy life." 

Remember, Jesu, for my sake 
Thou didst thy manhood undertake, 
Thou wilt not. Lord, thine own forsake. 



MEDITATION V. 
0n t^e great I9as of JltUrgment. 

" God hath appointed a day in which he will judge the world in 
righteousness by that man whom he hath ordained/* 

Acts xvii. 31. 

Prelude T. Picture to yourself all the tribes of 
the earth gathered together into the valley of Jeho- 
shaphat,^ and the Son of Man coming in the clouds of 
heaven with power and great glory, surrounded by 
innumerable angels, and His saints. 

Prelude II. Ask grace of God that you may en- 
tertain a salutary dread of that Day, and judge your- 
self that you " be not judged of the Lord." 

The first point, — Consider the terrors with which 
that Day shall he ushered in. At present nobody in ike 
world is so much despised as the Man Christ Jesus. 
We fear the wrath even of the meanest of our fellow- 
creatures whom we have insulted or offended; but 
of the sins by which we have defiled the temples of 
His Holy Spirit, and made the members of His Body 

^ Joe\m» 



^n tte great I9as of Jfutrgment. [127 

the members of an harlot^ by which in a word we have 
crucified afresh the Son of God, and put Him to an 
open shame in the sight of the "cloud of witnesses" 
which stand around — of these sins we take no account 
or treat them as matters of no importance — nay, quite 
as jests. We cannot endure one word said in deroga- 
tion of our own honour, even behind our backs, and 
yet suffer others to speak impiously and blaspheme 
Him to His very face. " Shall I not visit for these 
things ? saith the Lord : and shall not my soul be 
avenged on such a nation as this?"* Therefore God 
" hath appointed a Day in the which He will judge 
the world,"* even as saith the prophet, "the great 
and the terrible Day of the Lord."* Think, then, with 
trembling over the tokens that shall precede and ac- 
company that Day. 

1. That Day shall be preceded by wars and ru- 
mours of wars amongst the nations, earthquakes, pes- 
tilences, and famines, fearful sights, and great signs 
in the heavens, for " there shall be signs in the sun, 
and in the moon, and in the stars. "^ That is, say St. 
Matthew and St. Mark, " The sun shall be darkened, 
and the moon shall not give her light, and the stars 
shall fall from heaven," — or, as the prophet Joel ex- 
plains the same horrors, " The sun shall be turned 
into darkness, and the moon into blood... The sun 
and the moon shall be darkened, and the stars shall 
withdraw their shining." Thus the heavens shall be 
as it were convulsed, the time of their dissolution 
being at hand ; and men's hearts shall fail them for 
the foresight of the evils which are coming on the 
earth. 

2. Then, too, shall come ike falling away or general 
apostacy from the Faith; "And the man of sin... 
who opposeth and exalteth himself above all that is 



/ 



» Jer. Y. 9. * Acts xviL 31. » Joel ii. 31. • Luke xxL 25, 



128] mtnitation V. 



called God," that is, the Antichrist, shall appear,? and 
working ''great signs and wonders," and miracles, 
" with all deceiyableness of unrighteousness," shall in- 
crease the " distress of nations with perplexity," so as 
almost to " deceiye the yery elect," for whose " sake 
those days shall be shortened:" but not until the 
fierce persecution of Antichrist has hr exceeded in 
violence all that have gone before; " for there shall be 
great tribulation, such as was not since the begin- 
ning of the world to this time, no, nor ever shall be."* 

3. Then " the Day of the Lord" drawing nigh "as 
a thief in the night," and coming '' as a snare upon 
all the inhabitants of the whole earth," the universal 
Fire shall fall suddenly upon the earth and the 
works that are therein, and bum them up, while 
" the heavens pass away with a great noise and the 
elements melt with fervent heat."** 

4. The sound of the Trumpet i" waxing louder and 
louder" shall be heard throughout the limits of space 
proclaiming the awful summons, "Arise, ye dead, 
and come to Judgment." 

5. At "the voice of the Archangel,,. the dead in 
Christ shall rise." Nay, at that hour "all that are 
in the graves shall hear His voice and shall come 
forth," to receive a portion according to their works ; 
" they that have done good unto the resurrection of 
life, and they that have done evil unto the resurrec- 
tion of damnation. "2 And they shall take their 
bodies again " that they may receive the things done 
in the body," The just shall shine like the stars in the 
firmament of heaven, but the bodies of the wicked 
shall be insufferably horrible. 

6. All good and bad together shall be gathered in a 
valley, which is thought to be typically expressed in 



/ 



7 1 These, ii. 3. « Mat xxiv. 21. » 1 Pet iii. 10. 

' 1 Tbess. iv. 16. * 3olMVN,*ia,*I^. 



iBn tfjt great 29as of JitUrgment. [129 

the prophet^ as the yalley of Jehoshaphat, between the 
Mount of Calvary, where the Kedeemer suffered for 
mankind, and the Mount of Oliyes, whence He as- 
cended into heaven. 

7. Then the Angels shall go forthy and separate 
the good from the bad, " as a shepherd divideth his 
sheep from the goats... and... shall set the sheep on 
the right hand, but the goats on the left"* of the 
great white Throne* of Judgment which shall be 
standing there. 

8. " Then shall appear the Sign of the Son of Man 
in heaven," the triumphant banner of the Cross, and 
all shall see "the Judge of quick and dead" "coming 
in the clouds of heaven with power and great glory," ^ 
surrounded by His angels and the saints,^ '* thousand 
thousands minister unto Him, and ten thousand 
times ten thousand stand before Him ; the judgment 
is set, and the books are opened. "^ 

9. " Then shall all the tribes of the earth Tnoum*'^ 
and " then shall they begin to say to the mountains, 
fall on us, and to the hills, cover us."^ "Hide us 
from the face of Him that sitteth on the throne, and 
from the wrath of the Lamb.*'^ Pojider well this 
scene and the words of St. Jerome, '' as often as I 
consider the Day of Judgment, I tremble : that 
trumpet appears always to sound in my ears. 
Arise ye dead and come to Judgment.*'* 

The second point, — Consider the Judgment itself 
How frightful now will be the situation of the 
wicked, who by this time will be severed from the 
righteous ! The line of separation shall run be- 
tween father and son, husband and wife, brother and 
sister, mother and daughter. The ties of earth shall 

3 Joel iii. * Mat. xiii. 41 ; and xxv. 32. c Rev. xx. 11. 
« Mat. xxiv. 30, and Acts x. 42. "^ St. Jude. » Dan. vii. 10. 
' Mat xxiv. 30. * Luke xxiii. 30. * Rev. vL 16, » In. Mat. cas^.x . \ 



130] tmrsitation V. 



L 



be all nothing then. What shame and pain should 
we feel it to be turned out of church now in the 
sight of a yery small congregation, nay even to be 
compelled ignominiously to quit a room full of friends 
and good men ! But here is exclusion from all that 
is good and holy ! An everlasting separation from 
the happy company which are to dwell in the city of 
God, and an eternal union with the accursed society 
** without," namely, " dogs and sorcerers, and whore- 
mongers, and murderers, and idolaters, and liars."* 
Upon earth men esteem the rich and noble and 
powerful to be happy, so that they almost use the 
same words to express wealth and happiness, richer 
and goodness. Of the saints they make little or no ac- 
count, nay, they hold them beneath contempt ; they 
think their lives. to be '^ madness, and their end 
without honour."^ But now, when the lost se^ 
them " numbered among the children of God," wha1> 
bitter, piercing agony shall they feel while they^ 
contrast what they have provided for themselves* 
with what they have forfeited ! And the mighty^ 
men of the earth, too, how little pride shall thej^^ 
take in their worldly honours now, while they ar^ 
expecting the " sharp judgment" which " shall be to 
them that be in high places."^ And the rich, how 
little will they glory in their riches, while they reflects 
that they in their " lifetime had their good things.'* 
Oh wretched man ! who, for the sake of some short- 
lived pleasure, for a little better fortune, for a rather 
higher post, art about to be a principal in the deep 
tragedy of Judgment — oh secret sinner ! who ere- 
while concealed thy wicked deeds under a thick 
cloud of darkness, or within the hidden chambers of 
thy polluted heart, now every eye is turned upon 
thee ; in ^pite of thyself thy secrets are laid bare to 

* Rev. xxh. 15. ^ Wis. v. 4. * ^S&.^ ^. 



I 



i^n tfjt great I9as of Jlulrginent. [131 

all, and to thy Judge ! Now, woe to all them that 
have received great graces to no purpose, "Woe 
unto thee, Chorazin, woe unto thee, Bethsaida." Woe 
to those Christians, who being contrasted with the 
virtuous heathen, have fewer good works to shew. 
Woe to the priest whose life has been scandalous, 
compared with the good laity. Woe to all who have 
despised " the riches of God's goodness and forbear- 
ance and long-suffering ; not knowing that the good- 
ness of God" should have led them " to repentance." 
How wilt thou escape who hast thus " treasured up 
unto thyself wrath against the Day of wrath and re- 
velation of the righteous judgment of God V Lo ! 
now He renders to "every man according to his 
deeds." 7 

Third point. — Consider that the Judge will now 
rise from His seat and pronounce the Jlnal sentence, 

* Blessed " then, yea, thrice blessed, shall he be 

* whose unrighteousness is forgiven, and whose sin 
is covered. Blessed" he who has said on earth 

^I will confess my sins," and "to whom the Lord 
imputeth no sin." Wretched he against whom all 
things cry for vengeance... the devils... his own con- 
science... the very walls of their habitation, for "the 
stone shall cry out of the wall," saith the prophet,^ 
" and the beam out of the timber shall answer it." 

Then, turning to the elect, the Judge will say 
" Come ye blessed of my Father, inherit the Kingdom 
prepared for you from the foundation of the world," 9 
enter with me into " that great city the holy Jeru- 
salem,"^ which has the glory of God. This kingdom 
was from the first foundation of the world prepared, 
not for others, as hell for the devil and his angels, 
but for t/ou — for the elect. " Rise up, my beloved — 

7 Rom. ii. 6. « Hab.ii. 11. 

» Mat XXV. 34. * Rev. xxi» 



132] ^elritatiott V, 



"and come away — For, lo, the winter is past, the 
rain is oyer and gone." The day breaks " and the 
shadows flee away."^ Henceforth shall ye be united 
with God and with one another, and no sorrow 
or care shall ever reach you ; but that joy is yours 
which eye hath not seen, nor ear heard, nor the heart 
of man conceiyed, for ever. 

Then turning to the reprobate He will say, " De- 
part from me, ye cursed, into everlasting fire, pre- 
pared for the devil and his angels." And then shall 
they say to Him, Why Lord 1 Have we not eaten, 
and drunk in Thy presence % Hast Thou not taughfc 
in our streets ? But He shall answer, Depart fron^ 
Me ye accursed workers of iniquity, begone, "I 
never knew you." I never wish to know you — enter 
at once into everlasting fire — ^ye shall never see Me, 
and I will never hear you any more. Since I havo 
called in vain, and stretched out My hands to no pur- 
pose, go, ye damned, despisers of counsel and reproofl 
But where, Lord, shall they go % Into Hell fire, 
there to bum both body and soul. For how long ? 
For ever, for ever and ever, world vrithout end, as 
long as God is God, as long as their immortal souls 
and bodies last : " for there their worm dieth Twty 
and their fire is not quenched." Then says St. 
Ephrem, the lost shall take leave of the angels and 
saints, and of their relations who are amongst the 
elect, and of the Virgin Mother, as the bridal train 
of the saints sweeps past. " Farewell, ye neighbours 1 
Farewell, Cross ! Farewell, Paradise ! Fare- 
well, fathers and children, for we shall never see any 
of you again ! Farewell, Mary, Mother of God 1"* 

Then shall the ground cleave asunder beneath 
their feet, and the bottomless pit shall appear in the 
midst of the valley where they are standing. God, 

^ Cantii. * Sl."E.^\ff«ni, ^^^^^^kssu 



\ 



a^n tfjt great 2I9a8 of Jiulrgment. [133 

who but would flee, if they could, at the cry of them 
as they go down into their eternal dungeon, and the 
smoke of their torment ascendeth up for ever and 
ever ! And when those gates are closed again, which 
never shall be opened any more throughout all eter- 
nity, what horror, blasphemy, and despair, shall 
reign within its boundless profundity ! 



MEDITATION VI. 
0n f^ell. 

** Who among us shall dwell with everlasting burnings." 

Isaiah xxxiii. 1 4. 



/- 



Prelude I. Imagine yourself to have gone down 
alive into hell, and there to behold " the lake of fire 
and brimstone," and those that are cast therein who 
are " tormented day and night for ever and ever." 

Prelude II. Pray for a wholesome fear of hell 
torments, that, if the love of righteousness should fail 
to lead you, at least the dread of the fiery lake may 
keep you from sin. 

T/ie Jlrst point, — What is hell ? The rich man 
answers a "place of torment"^ a place of "everlast- 
ing burnings," where all the senses and limbs of the 
damned shall have their own proper torment, and 
where each sense suffers in proportion as it has sinned ; 
for " wherewithal a man sinneth, by the same also he 
shall be punished," ^ and Almighty God is wont to 
make, as His rewards, so also His punishments appro- 
priate to the deeds which merit them. 

* Luke xvi. 28. » Wis. xi. 16. 



134] ^elrttatton VI, 



1 



/ 



The sense of sigfU suffers an utter privation, an 
eternal darkness ; or if it retains any powers of vision, 
it is only enough to see the horror of darkness by 
which it is surrounded. It is "a land of darkness as 
darkness itself, and of the shadow of death, without 
any order, and where the light is as darkness."^ Even 
the flame of hell fire, it is said, will give no light. 
how dreadful would it be to be condemned to the | 
mines or a close narrow cell where no light could 
enter for twenty years. But what were this, though 
aggravated a thousand times, to the darkness of hell ! 
The sense of heai^ng is distracted constantly with 
wailings and cries of agony, or with shocking curses 
and blasphemies, the accents of complete despair, 
which reverberate within those dungeons. How fear- 
ful would it be to lie in a lazar-house or hospital 
amidst sick and dying persons, and to listen during the 
long, painful, feverish night to their groans. But oh ! 
what is that to the cries of hell ! The sense of smell 
receives the reward of its iniquity in the foul stench 
which that pit of destruction sends forth, from the 
bodies of so many reprobates. How frightful was 
that punishment which chained the living man to a 
dead corpse till both were consumed — ^yet even that 
death was short; it had an end; whereas here "their 
worm dieth not." Besides the whole bed of flames is 
sulphurous, — it is all fire and brimstone where they are 
crowded together, "for they lie in the hell like sheep,**? 
The sense of taste is tortured with incessant hunger 
and incessant thirst — a drop of water would be to 
them the most precious of gifts — but they shall never 
have it. In vain the rich man asks for a drop— it is 
impossible. The sense of touch is subjected to the 
scorching heat of devouring fire— of this our Lord 
often speaks, "Depart from me," He says to the 

* Job. X. 22. "* "Psm. iiVx. \^. 



®n ?fteU. [135 



L 



cursed, " into everlasting fire" — and hell He declares 
to be a place where " their Jlre is not quenched." 
flow horrible do we think the death of burning alive ! 
and it i8 a most severe death. But what must it be 
then to live in flames ! Oh, " who shall dwell with 
everlasting burnings V 

Second point — What is hell ? The loss of GocPs 
&vour and the light of His countenance for ever. It 
is not the darkness, or the incessant shrieks, or the 
insufierable stench, or the flame which subjects the 
tongue to thirst and the whole body to excruciating 
pain, which makes it so truly hell as the loss of God. 
The soul which is damned has lost the jewel of great 
price which was within her grasp, and which was 
worth all she possessed, how many times told ! She 
has lost the one only Good. She has lost an Infinite 
Good, and the pain of this loss is in itself, in a man- 
ner, infinite. She has lost the union with Christ, the 
fellowship of the Angels and the communion of Saints. 
She is doomed, to an eternal banishment from the 
joyous city of the heavenly Jerusalem, with its gold 
and precious stones, its tree and rivers of life. Oh 
how bitter to think, I have sold the birthright I had 
by creation; by Baptism; and again and again by grace 
in vain — alas ! there is now no place for repentance 
though I seek it carefully with tears. With what an 
agony of grief do we part with those we love best on 
earth 1 How great is the pain of a father or mother, 
who watch their only son expiring before them ! or 
of a wife when she bids the last farewell to her hus- 
band ; or of brothers and sisters, and very dear friends 
under similar circumstances ! But what is their pain 
compared with the pain of eternal separation from 
God 1 Oh those words, " Depart from Me ye cursed," 
shall convey a worse pang than all the other torments 
of hell put together. For if the reprobate could see 
God, then hell should be no more hell. And if the 



136] ^elrttattott VI, 



lost could so much as feel the love of God, then hell 
should not be hell. But there they neither see Him. 
nor loye Him. They know their own loss indeed, 
but their state is that of eternal despair, and they 
curse God and curse themselves, they curse the saints 
and all the elect, they curse the sacraments and all the 
blessings they have received and despised, and go on 
hating and hateful for ever ; for their conscience tor- 
ments them ; that is the undying worm ; and they 
cannot be resigned to God's Will, else hell were nofc- 
hell. 

The third point — What is hell ? An eternity o£ 
misery, " Where their worm dieth not, and their fire 
is not quenched." The sharpest pain, if it lasts but 
a very short time is bearable ; but the slightest pain^ 
if it be incessant, is very terrible. What then must 
be complete torture, lasting for ever and ever ! How 
tedious is monotony ! Here are the same shrieks, the 
same groans, the same scene for all eternity. How 
mad would it be to risk ten or twenty years' banish- 
ment from home and friends, and confinement so long 
in the mines for one day's pleasure I And if hell 
lasted but one hundred years, it would be madness to 
incur the risk of it. But now after one hundred, and 
one thousand, and millions of years, it is still only 
beginning. How long do we think one feverish 
night ! how often do we feel disposed to cry " Would 
God it were morning 1" but in hell no one says, 
" Would God it were morning !" for there no morning 
shall ever rise. The voice of justice, and the trumpet 
of Divine vengeance proclaim continually that the 
punishment is for ever and for ever ; that the end 
shall come never; the sound of the words, "into 
everlasting fire," never dies away ; and the reprobate 
wake up only to "shame and everlasting contempt." ^ 



/ 



* Dan. «i. % 



inoe the damned wish for death, " Death, a^zeopt- 

[e is th7seDteace,..to him that despaireth and hath 

t p»\Auace ]"9 but they find it not. "And in tliose 

ia shall mta seek death, and shall not find it : ani: 

jl)' desjn tio die, and death gh&ll flee from thtenii" 

ttkiBis'tlie second deatli ian^ich "death gnayisth 

,gpjin''.th'em;''=; yat do theyieViW, dfe If the,^! 

A«|mWa|nd-tiife!W'-k'Jew that at,ffie;_«td rf millrooB'-- 

^> i*^i miiiioBS.of »&4»' tliey ah^l4< ,ganevi6ufr<J)f .b^ Mf 

^ i,jS^;.yiild' be^afi linger .hell to th^m,^. They caa: '-^ 

-'"-"— "if JseMiyei.l'fffcsy cannot, everi if dod willed it; ' ' ' 

^BB'ibey tfifl-'it' not themselves. TKey/ire as ft- 

jJ^Bfe fotheU, ajud hell prepared fer tbtm.' They 

_,, r^Xfl wTfiKft.'anr'iVe iS:a'Kaj^ff&iS^tbey 

;^)(A.,be'nowh^eVnt in helL Ail, GhriatiMi, ifjQU 

'jmio' siunedr, ypu-^ji^ in danger of these torments — ■ 

.yoi^cankieTerie jiite that you have so repeated as ti>^- 

fl|(^' ,bb'EaJnbd','w(fel.oa ;. yet you certainly.^ow may 

I^^T^ivdon^U-^^iW' forth then "worthy 'fraiW-rf 

i'-l^^WtATION VII. 



■'^•■ 



' JDn ^eahdi. 



C^.'^f^-i hnth lio't seAirdfaii^'lK 



hnth riot saAil 
,, '-^tftoK 

';"?■--■' -'■ ■■ - 'vL'f . "-^ji w - " -' 

:j^6wi»i^. ^.-./^ogiliit-'yoiirBelf with, -St,--Pftul 




.^^a^.but^a-"- 






138] ^elritattott VH. 



/ 



Prelude II. Pray God to open your eyes and your 
heart to understand the happiness which is reserred 
for the elect. 

The firgt point, — Consider the joys of heaven : Jbf. 
this is what our Lord promises His faithful foUowexs, • 
" Your sorrow shall be turned into joy."* Joy, so in- 
tense, that one who feels it as it were forgets himself, . 
and is quite lost in it ; insomuch that he ** remember- 
eth no more" his past trials and suffe^gs in this world' ' 
be they never so seyere. But you upll saj, .Describe. 
these joys to me. What are they! • The Apostle,- 
who either "in the body or out of the body" liad. 
been "caught up to the third heaven," Bays; that, 
the words which he heard when in Paradise were 
"unspeakable," and such as "it is not lawful t6 
utter." 4 And, again, that neither- "^ye" nor "ear" 
nor "heart of man" can form apy sort of notion 
worthy of them. Could one bom "in a dungeon, 
who never had been out, conceive th^ beauties of the 
starlight night, or of the bright y^f firmament; of 
heaven at mid-day, from the lamp jmd darknessf to 
which he had hitherto been comned? Can Ihp 
brute creation imagine the delights '.of intellectuals 
pursuits ? Even so cannot we conceive*of the deleft 
of happiness which is in heaveti,-or understand the 
raptures of spiritual bliss. We«.should, however, try 
to rise up towards the couteinp}^t|Qn x^ the heavenly 
by comparing it with the'eaf^Ut, 'The saints and . 
elect in their way, as well as» tfil» wicked in theirs, "^ 
are to receive " the things done in ike hodyV There- 
fore they shall be endowed with glorified bodies, in* •. 
capable of suffering ; capable of dU inanner of hes^. 
venly delights. iVow, we Iw^ b^dietf which are 
scarcely capable of more than ^urthly. joys, and we 
have but iittl^ idea of any bbi earthly pleasures. 



« • 



^'Joiv, xyi. 20. «• * ^ Cot.xvu 



en V^tahtn. [139 



L 



K, then, some things here below in this world, 
which is not meant for enjoyment, still give us great 
pleasure, how exquisite shall be the happiness of 
those whose bodies are made for heavenly delights, 
and placed in realms prepared for bliss 1 We are 
wont to call the beauties of nature lovely, and its 
grand features glorious. Consider the rising sun, for 
instance, as its beams first touch the white tops of 
the high snowy mountains, and tinge the whole ho- 
rizon with purple and gold 1 Or consider the setting 
sun as, from its deep vermilion bed, it sheds its 
bright rays of light over the forest glade, the clear 
stream, on mountain side, or through the rich corn- 
field, and pleasant meadow. Yet, these are but mock- 
eries and illusions compared with the scenes the elect 
gaze upon in the lawns of Paradise. How great are 
the pleasures of association, and how wonderful the 
delight we take in monuments of the past, memorials 
of ancient men of renown, famous cities, with their 
buildings full of history, countries of which we have 
read much, and especially the mighty edifices raised 
in olden time to the glory and honour of God, the 
resting-places of the saints, and the scenes of miracles ; 
and, above all, the hallowed spots trodden by the 
Son of God Himself ! Yet are all these unsatisfac- 
tory, insufficient ; shadows, as it were, of which the 
realities are in heaven, in the New Jerusalem, for 
the reward of them that love God. Earthly music 
is oftimes very thrilling, it soothes distracted minds, 
and transports the captive exile to his home again ; 
what then shall be the harmony of the spheres^ 
Great is the fragrance of the air in spring, and the 
sweet scent of countless flowers ; yet may they not be 
compared with the odours of the garden of Eden. 
Food to the hungry, and drink to the thirsty, and 
rest to the weary, are all sources of joy and gladness, 
which shall in some high and heavenly '9(^ b^ \s\»ji<^ 



140] mtnitaUon VM. 



good " unto the man whom the King delighteth to 
honour," 5 whom the Almighty is pledged to reward 
to the full, for " ask that ye may receiye," says He, 
"that your joy may be full" ^ 

The second point, — Consider what it is to see God, 
All the other joys of heaven, although the least of them 
is above human powers of mind to imagine, are as 
nothing compared with this one source of bliss, viz., 
the sight of God, Therefore St. Paul puts that alone 
for admittance into heaven, where he says, "holi- 
ness without which no man shall see the Lord." 7 
Heaven would cease to be heaven if God were no 
longer there ; and the lost souls in hell would enjoy 
heavenly bliss could they but see Him in the midst 
of their torments. "All that we expect," says St. 
Augustine, " is contained in one word — God." Now^ 
at best, we are in darkness and banishment, becaus 
we cannot, or can scarcely see Him. " Now we se^ 
through a glass darkly, but then," amazing thought W 
"face to face,"* now, " I know in part, but then,'^^ 
miracle of love and condescension ! " / shall hiuyucP 
even as I am known.** The veil which at present 
blinds our eyes, and spoils our vision, shall be with- 
drawn, and we shall stand in the brightness of the divine 
light. We shall be endued with the wonderful power 
of seeing God, and yet not ceasing to live ; for this 
is the especial blessedness of " the pure in heart," if 
so be we may attain to be so called, that " they shall 
see God." 8 It is not, indeed, to be supposed that we 
can in this life fully understand the supreme bliss of 
thus possessing God ; yet, neither can it seem strange 
that it should be so transcendent, when we remember 
that He is the One Sovereign Good to all created 
beings of whom He is the Creator. Nay, and let us 
remember, too, that He is to us over and above all 




^ Esther, vi, 6. « John,xyi.24. '»'ftfe\i.3:\\.\4:, ^^^\..'h»8. 



A 



0n f^eaben. [141 



this our Saviour from a far worse lot than what it 
would haye been had we been left in original no- 
thingness. He descended upon earth, was made man, 
for our sakes ; took upon Him the form and likeness 
of a slave ; for us suffered the pain and shame of the 
cross; that He loves us while we cleave to Him 
without ceasing ; nay, even while we were yet sin- 
ners and His enemies, died to redeem us. Oh how 
great is the joy of loving and being beloved ! Here, 
then, is infinite love towards us, claiming and giving 
the power of an infinite return. Hence, some saints 
have been lifted up from the earth in a transport, 
while they meditated (even in this life) on divine 
love. St. F. Xavier was forced to cry out, " Enough, 
Lord, enough," being overflowed with those divine 
consolations. " Wait ye," says another, " that your 
body may be dissolved ; not thinking that the soul 
can even now be soothed to Christ 1 But believe me, 
man, if thou wouldest enter into Him by these 
narrow Openings (His Wounds) not thy soul only, but 
thy body also shall find therein a wonderfiil repose 
and sweetness... that thou wilt esteem all other plea- 
sures as nothing save those which it tastes there... 
and the soul shall be inebriated with such sweetness 
that scarcely shalt thou be able to turn it away to 
aught besides." 9 Martyrs, inflamed with the love of 
God, have not felt the tortures under which they 
died. The most exalted love of God is only the most 
perfect purity of heart. For, " who shall ascend into 
the hill of the Lord V* asks the holy psalmist. Now, 
this " hill of the Lord" is the Son of God ; and so he 
answers, "Even he that hath... a pure heart." And, 
that the elect have the power of returning the love 
of God, St. John tells us, for he says, " When He 
shall appear we shall be like Him, for we shall see 



/ 



' St. Bonaventora ; see FouDdations of the Spiritual Life, by 
F. Suiin, translated, Pief. p.xxxm. 



142] ^elritattott Vlh 



Him as He is j"^ so that neither the misery jfrom 
which we haye been freed, nor the outward happiness 
which we possess, but this only, shall be the object of 
our joy. Ah ! let us consider well the manner of 
entering into the joys of the Lord. 

The third point. — Consider the eternity of heaven. 
In this world every pleasure, however great, every 
state of happiness, however complete, comes rapidly 
to an end. And this thought is enough to damp all 
earthly joys, for the greater they are the greater must 
be the pain of losing them. The whole system in 
which we live is passing away. " They shall perish 
...they all shall wax old as doth a garment; and as a 
vesture shalt Thou change them, and they shaU he 
changed."^ But there is One who ever was and ever 
will be. " Thou Lord, in tlie beginning hast laid the 
foundation of the earth... Thou shalt endure... Thou 
art the same, and Thy years shall not fail." As long 
as God is God, the elect shall enjoy unceasing bliss. 

Cast forward your mind through centuries, and 
thousands and tens of thousands of years, still their 
happiness is no nearer to its end. It is as though it 
began yesterday. As it is without alloy, so it is 
eternal and certain for ever. In this life no man is 
sure of himself. Though he be so happy as to be in 
the grace of God at present, yet he may fall away ; 
no height of goodness or holiness is safe from the 
danger of falling. Even the great apostle St. Paul 
was anxious about himself, lest " having preached to 
others, he should be found a castaway at the last." * And 
if he was thus uncertain of himself, who had forsaken 
all things to preach the Gospel, who was favoured 
with so many visions and revelations from the Lord, 
who wrought so many and so great miracles, and 
above all was so inflamed with the love of Christ that 

' J John, iii. 2. * Palm. c\i. * \ C.w. vx.,^ . 



\ 



d^n i^eaben. [143 



even in this life he counted all things else as dung — 
how great should be the insecurity of most men ! But 
in heaven every soul is certain of loving and being 
beloved for ever 1 At the right hand of God there are 
joys for evermore I Consider then the death of a reli- 
gious person, who having renounced the world, and 
given himself up to the service of God, is called away 
early to receive the crown of glory and enjoy the 
everlasting happiness of heaven. When he has 
breathed his last breath, he enters the land of spirits. 
He receives the sentence of justification, "Come thou 
blessed of My Father ; " he is received by the joyful 
chorus of angels, he is welcomed by the congratula- 
tions of the saints ; his ears are filled with the harmony 
of heaven ; his eyes are lost in beholding the glory of 
God ; he passes up through the skies ; far above the 
highest constellations ; he stands before the throne of 
God ; he rejoins his relations and friends, and the 
devout of all ages, who have gone before him ; and 
placed in the eternal sunshine of divine favour, he is 
united to God for ever and ever. 






^ Vrotestatton concerning WtB,% 

To be made as toell hf those who are in health as by those who 

are sick, 

my God, prostrate in Thy presence, I worship 
Thee, and I desire to make this declaration as if I 
were on the point to die, and about to pass from this 
life to that which shall never end. 

Lord, because Thou art the Truth and canst not 
lie, but hast revealed It to the Church, I believe the 
mystery of the most holy Trinity, — Father, Son^ and 
Holjr Ghost, — three Persona, V>\i\. oi^^ ^T^<5i^<^^^^^'» 



144] ^ 9totestatton concerning IBcatQ. 



judging all men according to their works, awardetH 
heaven to the righteous, and hell to sinners. I be- 
lieve that the Second Person — the Son of God — 
became man, and died for our salvation. I believe 
all that the holy Catholic Church believeth and 
teacheth : " I believe in God, the Father Almighty, 
<fec." 

I thank Thee, Lord, that Thou hast made me a 
Christian, and I solemnly declare that in this holy 
Faith I desire to live and to die. 

God, my hope, trusting in Thy promises I hope 
to receive from Thy mercy, — ^not through my merits, 
but through the merits of Jesus Christ, — the pardon 
of my sins, perseverance in Thy Grace, and, after 
this wretched life, the glory of Heaven. And should 
Satan at my death tempt me to despair at the 
sight of my sins, I solemnly declare that I will always 
hope in Thee, my only Lord and Saviour, and that 
I desire to die in the arms of Thy goodness. 

God, worthy of infinite love, I love Thee with 
my whole heart, and more than I love myself. I de- 
sire to die in an act of love, that so I may continue 
loving Thee throughout endless ages in Heaven. 
Therefore I ask this love of Thee. And if, Lord, 
instead of loving Thee, I have hitherto despised 
Thine infinite goodness and mercy, I am now sorry 
for it with my whole heart, and I will die, if Thou 
wilt help me, bewailing and lamenting,* and hating 
for ever the sins I have committed against -Thee. I 
resolve for the future to die rather than to sin against 
Thee. For Thy sake I pardon all who have ever 
offended me. my God, I cheerfully accept death, 
and the pains which shall accompany death. I de- 
sire to unite them to the sorrows and passion of our 
Lord Jesus Christ, and to offer them to the honour 
of Thy dominion, and in 8a.t\aiiafition for my sins. 
Lord, for the sake of ttie gr^at ^^fiiry&Rfc ^i'SMSiSMSii 



k 



^ 9rotestatton concerning Bta% [145 

which Thy Son offered on the Altax of the Cross, 
accept this sacrifice of my life, which I offer unto 
Thee. I now, for the moment of my death, resign 
myself to Thy divine will, solemnly affirming that I 
wish to die saying " Thy will be done." 

Crucified Saviour, who to obtain a good death 
for me didst suffer a most painful death, remember 
me at my last hour, remember that I am one of Thy 
sheep whom Thou hast purchased with Thine own 
Blood. Shepherd of my soul, who alone canst 
guide and comfort me at that hour when I walk 
through the dark valley of the shadow of death — 
when no one of this earth shall stand by me — when 
no friend shall be able to profit me — be with me 
then — suffer me not to lose Thee for ever — cast me 
not off from Thee. beloved Jesus, since I embrace 
Thee now, receive me then — hide my sins in Thy 
holy Wounds — wash me in Thine immaculate Blood. 
At my last breath, I give Thee my heart, my soul, 
and my spirit. 

happy suffering to suffer for Thee — happy death 
to die in Thee. 

If Thou, Lord, wilt receive my soul, Death, 
where is thy sting 1 Grave, where is Thy victory ? 



a Bails Vtacet tor a l^ayyc Bts^. 

Lord Jesu Christ, through that agony which 
Thou sufferedst when Thou didst give up the Ghost 
upon the Cross, have mercy on my siniiil soul when 
it shall depart from this body. Amen. 



THE END. 



/ 




LONDON: 

Printed by 8. ft J. BxmxBT. Wxlsoh. and Fucy. 

Bangor House. Shoo Lane, 






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X 



This book it under no oiroumstancei 
takan from the Building 



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